COMPARATIVE ANTI-BACTERIAL IMMUNITY IN THE URINARY TRACT: DOES ONE SIZE FIT ALL? (2009–2011)

Abstract:
Urinary tract infections (UTI), which start as a bladder infection and often evolve to encompass the kidneys, are among the most common infectious diseases of humans. It is estimated that 40 to 50% of adult healthy women have experienced at least one UTI episode in their lifetime. Bacteria cause most UTI and this study will focus on how these bacteria survive in the urinary tract and will provide key insight into the ways in which human immune responses develop to counteract these bacteria.
Grant type:
NHMRC Project Grant
Researchers:
  • Professor
    School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
    Faculty of Science
  • Senior Research Fellow
    The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute
    Faculty of Medicine
Funded by:
National Health and Medical Research Council