The flipside of noise: Does it benefit listening and learning? (2016–2019)

Abstract:
People with low attention capacity can experience improvements in cognitive function (eg memory) in the presence of external white noise. This research aims to determine the brain mechanisms for this improvement, and how it impacts oral language comprehension and verbal learning. In doing so, the research will change the prevailing view that noise is always detrimental to mental processes, and will provide a theoretical framework for predicting how an individual¿¿¿s cognitive capacity is impacted by the presence of noise.
Grant type:
ARC Discovery Projects
Researchers:
  • Vice-Chancellors T&R Fellowship
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
    Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
    Affiliate Professor
    UQ Centre for Clinical Research
    Faculty of Medicine
  • Senior Lecturer in Speech Pathology
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
    Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
  • Associate Professor in Audiology
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
    Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
Funded by:
Australian Research Council