Diamonds in ophiolite: Recycling deep mantle into supra-subduction zones (2019–2022)

Abstract:
This project aims to investigate whether the controversial discovery of diamonds in oceanic rocks (known as ophiolites) is a global phenomenon. Even half a century after the introduction of plate tectonic theory, significant knowledge gaps remain regarding the fate of subducted lithosphere and Earth processes deep within the mantle. This project will use Australasian examples to test the hypothesis that diamonds are ubiquitous in the mantle and occur widely in ophiolites. Results will have major implications for our understanding of how ocean crust grows and how rocks in the upper mantle form, as well as providing insight into how organic carbon is cycled from the seabed deep into the mantle before being returned back to Earth's surface.
Grant type:
ARC Discovery Projects
Researchers:
  • Head of School
    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
    Faculty of Science
  • Lecturer in Tectonics
    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
    Faculty of Science
  • Lecturer in Igneous Petrology/Volca
    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
    Faculty of Science
  • Lecturer in Earth Sciences
    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
    Faculty of Science
  • Lecturer in Mineralogy/Sen Curator
    School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
    Faculty of Science
Funded by:
Australian Research Council