Dr Tuan Nguyen

Advance Queensland Fellow

Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation
Sustainable Minerals Institute
tuan.a.h.nguyen@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 64051

Overview

Tuan specialises in Colloid & Interface Science, Computational Molecular Science, and Organo-Mineral Interactions.

Tuan recently joined the Sustainable Minerals Institute to work on research to develop cost-effective and sustainable technologies for rehabilitating mine waste tailing. He has evolved in a wide range of research activities in the fields of colloid and interface science, and their practical applications in various disciplinary and interdisciplinary contexts, including agriculture, environment, and oil/gas/minerals processing.

Tuan's recent contributions to the field have been a series of studies on the heat and mass transfer of evaporating nanofluid droplets, self-assembly of nanoparticles within confined spaces, assembly of peptides into conducting-fibril, assembly of polymers and their interaction with other micro- (surfactants) and macro-(dsRNA) molecules.

Tuan is working toward "green" and sustainable solutions for mineral processing and transforming waste streams from mining industry. Here are RHD available projects from Tuan:

#1. Adsorption and Precipitation of Complex Ferric Polymers on Mineral Surfaces

#2. Natural-fiber reinforced mineral-gel based composites as Functional Materials in Remediation and Rehabilitation of Contaminated Environments

#3. From discrete to micro-/macro-aggregated structures of mine tailing subjected to effective stress and weathering process: Trajectory of Pedogenesis

#4. Preferential Fluid Flow and Salt Efflorescence within Heterogeneous Structure of Mine Tailing Deposits

#5. Understanding Fate and Transport of Fine and Ultra-fine Particulate Matters in Mining Environment

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland

Publications

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Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Surface weathering of Fe-rich primary minerals results in the release of free iron and other soluble minerals into the pore water. Adsorption and precipitation of these minerals onto the primary mineral surfaces lead to the formation of complex ferric polymer films, which gradually develop into an interconnected porosity network. These amorphous films, existing as oxides and (oxy)hydroxides of poly-mineral, were formed through the hydrolysis and poly-mineral cross-linking reactions. The ferric coating is also associated with phyllosilicates and organic carbons, thereby completely changing the reactivity of the host mineral grains. Despite their ubiquitous in many natural soil systems, this formation of complex ferric coating on mineral surface is not well understood, especially under hostile conditions like mine tailing deposits.

    This research will focus on identifying the structure of ferric oxides/(oxy)hydroxides coating and their sorptive interactions at the mineral-water interface under extreme acidic/alkaline environments. The underlying physics and chemistry of adsorption phenomena will then be described and used in mechanistic surface complexation models.

  • (for more detail, please email me at tuan.a.h.nguyen@uq.edu.au)

  • (for more detail, please email me at tuan.a.h.nguyen@uq.edu.au)

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Surface weathering of Fe-rich primary minerals results in the release of free iron and other soluble minerals into the pore water. Adsorption and precipitation of these minerals onto the primary mineral surfaces lead to the formation of complex ferric polymer films, which gradually develop into an interconnected porosity network. These amorphous films, existing as oxides and (oxy)hydroxides of poly-mineral, were formed through the hydrolysis and poly-mineral cross-linking reactions. The ferric coating is also associated with phyllosilicates and organic carbons, thereby completely changing the reactivity of the host mineral grains. Despite their ubiquitous in many natural soil systems, this formation of complex ferric coating on mineral surface is not well understood, especially under hostile conditions like mine tailing deposits.

    This research will focus on identifying the structure of ferric oxides/(oxy)hydroxides coating and their sorptive interactions at the mineral-water interface under extreme acidic/alkaline environments. The underlying physics and chemistry of adsorption phenomena will then be described and used in mechanistic surface complexation models.

  • (for more detail, please email me at tuan.a.h.nguyen@uq.edu.au)

  • (for more detail, please email me at tuan.a.h.nguyen@uq.edu.au)

  • (for more detail, please email me at tuan.a.h.nguyen@uq.edu.au)

  • Studying physio-chemical properties and interaction forces of fine and ultrafine particulate matters produced from mining activities and/or from a desert area, in arid to semi-arid climates (i.e. Australia). This knowledge is essential to develop effective approaches for mitigating particulate matters pollution at/near mine sites.