Professor Bhagirath Chauhan

Professorial Research Fellow

Centre for Crop Science
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
b.chauhan@uq.edu.au
+61 7 535 15092

Overview

Professor Bhagirath Chauhan joined the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI) at The University of Queensland in 2014. He now has a joint appointment with QAAFI and SAFS at UQ. He leads research on weed biology and weed management in different crops, including wheat, maize, sorghum, mungbean, soybean, chickpea, rice, and cotton. He has studied the seed ecology of >100 weed species and he has a vast experience in developing integrated weed management options based on agronomic approaches (row spacing, seeding rates, weed-competitive cultivars, etc.). Prof Chauhan has more than 20 years of research experience in conducting trials on the improved agronomy of new production systems and integrated weed management options in Australia and >10 Asian countries. Before joining UQ, Prof Chauhan worked at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines for seven years. He has a strong collaboration in several countries, including USA, Sri Lanka, India, Nepal, Iran, Pakistan, Nigeria and China. His research interests include weed ecology and biology, herbicide use, management of herbicide-resistant weeds, non-chemical weed management options, integrated weed management systems using agronomic and varietal components, nanoherbicides, tillage systems, and conservation agriculture systems. He is a Speciality Chief Editor with Frontiers in Agronomy and an Associate Editor of Weed Science (Weed Science Society of America). He has published over 350 articles in peer reviewed journals and several books and book chapters. He is an Honorary Member of Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) and a life member of International Weed Science Society (IWSS), Asia Pacific Weed Science Society (APWSS), and Indian Society of Weed Science (ISWS).

Research Interests

  • Agronomy
    Planting density, row spacing, suitable cultivar, optimise N
  • Weed biology
    Seed biology, plant biology, phenology, seed bank dynamics
  • Non-chemical weed control
    Tillage, cultural approaches (e.g., competitive crops)
  • Pesticide resistance, emphasise on herbicides
    Confirm resistance, resistance mechanism (molecular approach), alternate herbicide/pesticide options
  • Integrated Pest Management
    Integration of chemical and non-chemical tools
  • Organic agriculture
    Develop herbicide-free weed management programs
  • Nutrition profile
    In collaboration, evaluate nutrition profile of useful plants (seed and leaf)
  • Genetic diversity in weeds

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosphy, The University of Adelaide

Publications

View all Publications

Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Projects, based in Brisbane, available for Hons, Masters and PhD students. These projects will evaluate the nutritional profile of emerging (useful) plant species.

  • Description: The performance of post-emergence herbicides, including glyphosate, in controlling crop weeds can exhibit variations due to intricate interactions between herbicide application rates, weed species, and environmental factors. Generally, post-emergence herbicides prove to be less effective against weeds exposed to high temperatures or drought-induced stress. These environmental stressors tend to influence the herbicides' absorption, translocation, and metabolism. Given the increasing dependence on herbicides for weed management, it becomes imperative to assess the effectiveness of commonly used herbicides, such as glyphosate, in combatting weeds facing environmental stressors. This knowledge can significantly contribute to the formulation of effective weed control strategies in Australia. The primary goal of this research program is to evaluate the impact of drought and temperature on the performance of commonly utilized herbicides in weed control.

    Outcomes: Engaging in this research project will enable students to acquire valuable skills in experimental design, chemical safety, plant physiology, and data analysis. The study's findings will provide valuable insights into the interplay between herbicides and environmental conditions, thereby facilitating the development of guidelines beneficial to growers.

    Ideal for: This project is suitable for students pursuing or interested in fields such as plant physiology, weed science, climate change, agriculture, environmental science, and statistics. If you have an interest in this project or similar endeavours, please don't hesitate to reach out to us to explore how your skills and interests can be applied.

    Supervisor: Professor Bhagirath Chauhan (QAAFI and AGFS), Dr. Gulshan Mahajan (QAAFI)

    Location: Gatton Research Farm

    Suitable for: MSc (Course work) and MPhil

    Duration: Feb 2024 to Nov 2024; Feb 2025 to Nov 2025

  • Description: Pigeonpea and Mung Bean have great potential as legume rotation crops in cereal farming systems in subtropical Australia. Due to the high demand in the international market, Australian growers have shown interest in cultivating both of these species. Weeds are one of the most important biotic factors that can adversely affect legumes as options for controlling broadleaf weeds in the crop are very limited. Up to 90% yield losses have been reported in pigeonpea due to weed infestations and to a lesser extent mung bean.

    The development and use of herbicide-resistant pigeonpea and mung bean could be an effective way of controlling weeds in this crop. This can also result in reduced herbicide usage in the pigeonpea/mung bean cropping system. However, such products are not available commercially. Therefore, this project will evaluate herbicide resistance mechanisms in these legumes.

    Outcomes: In this project, the student will conduct an Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) experiment to mutagenize seed from pigeonpea (long duration crop) and mung bean (short duration crop) at the labs in St Lucia (UQ). The mutant populations will then be screened for herbicide resistance via seedling assays and field trials (to be conducted at Gatton). The student will develop important skills in experimental design, chemical safety, plant physiology, phenotyping and data analysis. If time permits, bioinformatic analysis to understand the resistance mechanism may occur.

    Suitable for: We are seeking a student who is studying or is interested in plant physiology, weed science, statistics and agriculture. A readiness to learn plant molecular genetics is also appreciated. If you are interested in this or similar projects, contact us to explore where your skills and interests can be applied.

    Supervisors: Professor Bhagirath Chauhan, Dr Bradley Campbell & Dr Guoquan Liu

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

  • Bhagirath Chauhan ed. (2021). Biology and management of problematic crop weed species. London, United Kingdom: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/C2019-0-04831-5

  • Khawar Jabran, Singarayer Florentine and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan eds. (2020). Crop protection under changing climate. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Cham. doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-46111-9

  • Khawar Jabran and Bhagirath S. Chauhan eds. (2018). Non-chemical weed control. London, United Kingdom: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/C2016-0-00092-X

  • Chauhan, Bhagirath S., Jabran, Khawar and Mahajan, Gulshan eds. (2017). Rice production worldwide. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-47516-5

  • Bhagirath S. Chauhan and Gulshan Mahajan eds. (2014). Recent advances in weed management. New York, NY, USA: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-1019-9

Book Chapter

  • Nosratti, Iraj and Chauhan, Bhagirath S. (2024). The Ecological Base of Nonchemical Weed Control. Ecologically Based Weed Management: Concepts, Challenges, and Limitations. (pp. 49-74) wiley. doi: 10.1002/9781119709763.ch4

  • Kaur, Simerjeet and Chauhan, Bhagirath S. (2023). Challenges and opportunities to sustainable crop production. Plant Small RNA in Food Crops. (pp. 25-43) Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/b978-0-323-91722-3.00006-3

  • Kumar, Vivek, Mahajan, Gulshan, Sheng, Qiang and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2023). Weed management in wet direct-seeded rice (Oryza sativa L.): issues and opportunities. Advances in Agronomy. (pp. 91-133) San Diego, USA: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/bs.agron.2023.01.002

  • Kaur, Simerjeet, Dhanda, Sachin, Yadav, Ashok, Sagwal, Pardeep, Yadav, Dharam Bir and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2022). Current status of herbicide-resistant weeds and their management in the rice-wheat cropping system of South Asia. Advances in Agronomy. (pp. 307-354) edited by Donald L. Sparks. Maryland Heights, MO, United States: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/bs.agron.2021.10.004

  • Matloob, Amar, Jabran, Khawar, Farooq, Muhammad, Khaliq, Abdul, Aslam, Farhena, Abbas, Tasawer, Ehsanullah,, Zaman, Umar, Irshad, Sohail and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2022). Water-wise cultivation of basmati rice in Pakistan. Modern techniques of rice crop production. (pp. 187-229) edited by Naeem Sarwar, Atique-ur-Rehman, Shakeel Ahmad and Mirza Hasanuzzaman. Singapore, Singapore: Wiley. doi: 10.1007/978-981-16-4955-4_13

  • Desai, Het Samir and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2021). Chloris truncata and Chloris virgata. Biology and Management of Problematic Crop Weed Species. (pp. 113-129) edited by Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. London, United Kingdom: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-822917-0.00006-9

  • Florentine, Singarayer, Humphries, Talia and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2021). Erigeron bonariensis, Erigeron canadensis, and Erigeron sumatrensis. Biology and Management of Problematic Crop Weed Species. (pp. 131-149) edited by Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. London, United Kingdom: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-822917-0.00024-0

  • Kaur, Amarpreet, Batish, Daizy Rani, Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh, Kaur, Shalinder, Singh, Harminder Pal and Kohli, Ravinder Kumar (2021). Parthenium hysterophorus. Biology and Management of Problematic Crop Weed Species. (pp. 311-333) edited by Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. London, United Kingdom: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-822917-0.00002-1

  • Chaudhary, Ankur, Kaur, Simerjeet and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2021). Phalaris minor and Phalaris paradoxa. Biology and Management of Problematic Crop Weed Species. (pp. 335-356) edited by Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. London, United Kingdom: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-822917-0.00018-5

  • Khalsa, Gurpreet Singh, Dahiya, Sahil and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2021). Sonchus oleraceus. Biology and Management of Problematic Crop Weed Species. (pp. 375-389) edited by Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. London, United Kingdom: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-822917-0.00001-X

  • Florentine, Singarayer, Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh and Jabran, Khawar (2020). Agriculture and crop protection: its global importance and relationship with climate change. Crop protection under changing climate. (pp. 1-16) edited by Khawar Jabran, Singarayer Florentine and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-46111-9_1

  • Jabran, Khawar, Ul-Allah, Sami, Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh and Bakhsh, Allah (2020). An introduction to global production trends and uses, history and evolution, and genetic and biotechnological improvements in cotton. Cotton production. (pp. 1-22) edited by Khawar Jabran and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. Chichester, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons. doi: 10.1002/9781119385523.ch1

  • Kaur, Simerjeet, Jabran, Khawar, Florentine, Singarayer and Chauhan, Bhagirath S. (2020). Assuring crop protection in the face of climate change through an understanding of herbicide metabolisms and enhanced weed control strategies. Crop protection under changing climate. (pp. 17-56) edited by Khawar Jabran, Singarayer Florentine and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. Cham, Switzerland: Springer . doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-46111-9_2

  • Kumar, Vivek, Mahajan, Gulshan, Dahiya, Sahil and Chauhan, Bhagirath S. (2020). Challenges and opportunities for weed management in no-till farming systems. No-till farming systems for sustainable agriculture: challenges and opportunities. (pp. 107-125) edited by Yash P. Dang, Ram C. Dalal and Neal W. Menzies. Cham, Switzerland: Springer . doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-46409-7_7

  • Mollaee, Mahboobeh, Mobli, Ahmadreza, Mutti, Navneet Kaur, Manalil, Sudheesh and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2020). Challenges and opportunities in cotton production. Cotton production. (pp. 371-390) edited by Khawar Jabran and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. Chichester, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons. doi: 10.1002/9781119385523.ch18

  • Ruttledge, Annie and Chauhan, Bhagirath S. (2020). Climate change and weeds of cropping systems. Crop protection under changing climate. (pp. 57-84) edited by Khawar Jabran, Singarayer Florentine and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. Cham, Switzerland: Springer . doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-46111-9_3

  • Kaur, Parminder, Bhagria, Tejinder, Mutti, Navneet Kaur, Rinwa, Abhimanyu, Mahajan, Gulshan and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2020). Cotton production in Australia. Cotton production. (pp. 341-357) edited by Khawar Jabran and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. Chichester, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons. doi: 10.1002/9781119385523.ch16

  • Jabran, Khawar, Florentine, Singarayer and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2020). Impacts of climate change on weeds, insect pests, plant diseases and crop yields: synthesis. Crop protection under changing climate. (pp. 189-195) edited by Khawar Jabran, Singarayer Florentine and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. Cham, Switzerland: Springer . doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-46111-9_8

  • Iqbal, Nadeem, Khan, Asad M. and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2020). Weed management in cotton. Cotton production. (pp. 109-126) edited by Khawar Jabran and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan. Chichester, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons. doi: 10.1002/9781119385523.ch6

  • Bajwa, Ali Ahsan, Khan, Muhammad Jamal, Bhowmik, Prasanta Chitta, Walsh, Michael and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2019). Sustainable weed management. Innovations in sustainable agriculture. (pp. 249-286) edited by Muhammad Farooq and Michele Pisante. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-23169-9_9

  • Jabran, Khawar and Chauhan, Bhagirath S. (2018). Overview and significance of non-chemical weed control. Non-chemical weed control. (pp. 1-8) edited by Khawar Jabran and Bhagirath S. Chauhan. London, United Kingdom: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-809881-3.00001-2

  • Peerzada, Arslan M. and Chauhan, Bhagirath S. (2018). Thermal weed control: history, mechanisms, and impacts. Non-chemical weed control. (pp. 9-31) edited by Khawar Jabran and Bhagirath S. Chauhan. London, United Kingdom: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/b978-0-12-809881-3.00002-4

  • Jabran, Khawar and Chauhan, Bhagirath S. (2018). Weed control using ground cover systems. Non-chemical weed control. (pp. 61-71) edited by Khawar Jabran and Bhagirath S. Chauhan. London, United Kingdom: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-809881-3.00004-8

  • Walsh, Michael and Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh (2017). A new approach to weed control in cropping systems. Biology, physiology and molecular biology of weeds. (pp. 45-62) edited by Mithila Jugulam. Boca Raton, FL, United States: CRC Press. doi: 10.1201/9781315121031-4

  • Jhala, Amit J., Sarangi, Debalin, Chahal, Parminder, Saxena, Ashish, Bagavathiannan, Muthukumar, Chauhan, Bhagirath Singh and Jha, Prashant (2017). Inter-specific gene flow from herbicide-tolerant crops to their wild relatives. Biology, physiology and molecular biology of weeds. (pp. 87-122) edited by Mithila Jugulam. Boca Raton, FL, United States: CRC Press. doi: 10.1201/9781315121031-6

  • Chauhan, Bhagirath S., Jabran, Khawar and Mahajan, Gulshan (2017). Preface. Rice production worldwide. (pp. v-vi) Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing.

  • Chauhan, Bhagirath S. and Gill, Gurjeet S. (2014). Ecologically based weed management strategies. Recent advances in weed management. (pp. 1-11) edited by Bhagirath S. Chuahan and Gulshan Mahajan. New York, NY, United States: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-1019-9_1

  • Mahajan, Gulshan, Chauhan, Bhagirath S. and Kumar, Vivek (2014). Integrated weed management in rice. Recent Advances in Weed Management. (pp. 125-153) edited by Bhagirath S. Chuahan and Gulshan Mahajan. New York, NY United States: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-1019-9_6

  • Chauhan, Bhagirath S. and Mahajan, Gulshan (2014). Preface. Recent Advances in Weed Management. (pp. v-vi) edited by Bhagirath S. Chauhan and Gulshan Mahajan. New York, NY, United States: Springer New York. doi: 10.1007/978-1-4939-1019-9

  • Chauhan, Bhagirath S., Mahajan, Gulshan, Sardana, Virender, Timsina, Jagadish and Jat, Mangi L. (2012). Productivity and sustainability of the rice-wheat cropping system in the Indo-Gangetic plains of the Indian subcontinent: Problems, opportunities, and strategies. Advances in Agronomy. (pp. 315-369) edited by Donald L. Sparks. San Diego United States: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-394278-4.00006-4

  • Mahajan, G., Chauhan, B. S. and Johnson, D. E. (2010). Weed management in aerobic rice in northwestern Indo-Gangetic plains. Water and Agricultural Sustainability Strategies. (pp. 297-312) CRC Press. doi: 10.1080/15427520902970458

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Projects, based in Brisbane, available for Hons, Masters and PhD students. These projects will evaluate the nutritional profile of emerging (useful) plant species.

  • Description: The performance of post-emergence herbicides, including glyphosate, in controlling crop weeds can exhibit variations due to intricate interactions between herbicide application rates, weed species, and environmental factors. Generally, post-emergence herbicides prove to be less effective against weeds exposed to high temperatures or drought-induced stress. These environmental stressors tend to influence the herbicides' absorption, translocation, and metabolism. Given the increasing dependence on herbicides for weed management, it becomes imperative to assess the effectiveness of commonly used herbicides, such as glyphosate, in combatting weeds facing environmental stressors. This knowledge can significantly contribute to the formulation of effective weed control strategies in Australia. The primary goal of this research program is to evaluate the impact of drought and temperature on the performance of commonly utilized herbicides in weed control.

    Outcomes: Engaging in this research project will enable students to acquire valuable skills in experimental design, chemical safety, plant physiology, and data analysis. The study's findings will provide valuable insights into the interplay between herbicides and environmental conditions, thereby facilitating the development of guidelines beneficial to growers.

    Ideal for: This project is suitable for students pursuing or interested in fields such as plant physiology, weed science, climate change, agriculture, environmental science, and statistics. If you have an interest in this project or similar endeavours, please don't hesitate to reach out to us to explore how your skills and interests can be applied.

    Supervisor: Professor Bhagirath Chauhan (QAAFI and AGFS), Dr. Gulshan Mahajan (QAAFI)

    Location: Gatton Research Farm

    Suitable for: MSc (Course work) and MPhil

    Duration: Feb 2024 to Nov 2024; Feb 2025 to Nov 2025

  • Description: Pigeonpea and Mung Bean have great potential as legume rotation crops in cereal farming systems in subtropical Australia. Due to the high demand in the international market, Australian growers have shown interest in cultivating both of these species. Weeds are one of the most important biotic factors that can adversely affect legumes as options for controlling broadleaf weeds in the crop are very limited. Up to 90% yield losses have been reported in pigeonpea due to weed infestations and to a lesser extent mung bean.

    The development and use of herbicide-resistant pigeonpea and mung bean could be an effective way of controlling weeds in this crop. This can also result in reduced herbicide usage in the pigeonpea/mung bean cropping system. However, such products are not available commercially. Therefore, this project will evaluate herbicide resistance mechanisms in these legumes.

    Outcomes: In this project, the student will conduct an Ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) experiment to mutagenize seed from pigeonpea (long duration crop) and mung bean (short duration crop) at the labs in St Lucia (UQ). The mutant populations will then be screened for herbicide resistance via seedling assays and field trials (to be conducted at Gatton). The student will develop important skills in experimental design, chemical safety, plant physiology, phenotyping and data analysis. If time permits, bioinformatic analysis to understand the resistance mechanism may occur.

    Suitable for: We are seeking a student who is studying or is interested in plant physiology, weed science, statistics and agriculture. A readiness to learn plant molecular genetics is also appreciated. If you are interested in this or similar projects, contact us to explore where your skills and interests can be applied.

    Supervisors: Professor Bhagirath Chauhan, Dr Bradley Campbell & Dr Guoquan Liu

  • Introduction: Annual ryegrass has become a significant concern in Australian agriculture, inflicting an annual cost of approximately $93 million on grain growers due to crop yield losses and the resources expended on management efforts. While its historical stronghold has been in the southern regions of Australia, recent observations have sounded the alarm regarding its encroachment into Queensland, thus posing a looming threat to the state's agricultural productivity. Our team has documented its unwelcome presence in Norwin, Queensland.

    The distinctive climatic conditions of Queensland, characterized by milder winters compared to their southern counterparts, may lead to variations in the ecology and biology of annual ryegrass populations within the state. Furthermore, given the potential introduction of these populations from other states, it is plausible that they have developed resistance to commonly used herbicides. The rapid proliferation of annual ryegrass and the ominous presence of herbicide-resistant strains demand our immediate and unwavering attention to thoroughly unravel the ecological and biological complexities and devise effective management strategies tailored to Queensland's unique circumstances.

    Objectives: The primary objective of this proposal is to conduct comprehensive research on annual ryegrass populations in Queensland, with the aim of evaluating their ecology, biology, and management options. By gaining an understanding of the unique characteristics of Queensland populations and their potential resistance to herbicides, we intend to develop effective strategies to prevent the proliferation of this weed in the region.

    Ideal for: This project is well-suited for students pursuing or interested in fields such as plant physiology, weed science, and climate change. If you are interested in this project or similar endeavours, please feel free to reach out to us to explore how your skills and interests can be applied.

    Supervisor: Professor Bhagirath Chauhan (QAAFI and AGFS) and Dr. Gulshan Mahajan (QAAFI). We may ask an industry supervisor.

    Location: Gatton Research Farm

    Suitable for: MSc (Course work) and MPhil

    Duration: Feb 2024 to Nov 2024; Feb 2025 to Nov 2025

  • Weeds pose the most significant biological challenge for Australian grain growers, resulting in annual costs exceeding $3.3 billion. Specifically, in the northern grain region of Australia, particularly Queensland, the emergence of prickly lettuce as a troublesome weed species demands immediate attention. Addressing this issue requires the creation of integrated weed management strategies tailored to effectively control this species. However, the development of such strategies hinges upon a comprehensive understanding of the biology and ecology of prickly lettuce, which is currently lacking, especially concerning the weed populations in the northern region. This project aims to bridge this knowledge gap by conducting a thorough study of the biology and ecology of prickly lettuce. Subsequently, it will leverage this information to devise integrated management options specifically designed to tackle this pervasive weed.

    Scholarship

    This is an Earmarked scholarship project that aligns with a recently awarded Australian Government grant.

    The scholarship includes:

    • living stipend of $33,641 per annum tax free (2024 rate), indexed annually
    • your tuition fees covered
    • single overseas student health cover (OSHC).

    Supervisors: Professor Bhagirath Chauhan and Dr Shane Campbell