Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh

Senior Lecturer

School of Law
Faculty of Business, Economics and Law
rebecca.aw@law.uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 52218

Overview

Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh is a Senior Lecturer at the TC Beirne School of Law. Dr Ananian-Welsh's research focuses primarily in the areas of: judicial independence, courts and court process, and the constitutional issues raised by national security law and anti-bikie law and policy. Dr Ananian-Welsh has published book chapters, articles in leading journals and has spoken widely at Australian and international events on these topics. Dr Ananian-Welsh has also given evidence to a Parliamentary Inquiry and contributed to a number of submissions to government with respect to national security laws and constitutional issues.

Prior to joining the TC Beirne School of Law, Dr Ananian-Welsh was an academic member of the Laureate Fellowship Project 'Anti-Terror Laws and the Democratic Challenge'. She also held research positions with the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law's Terrorism & Law Project, and Professor Janet Chan's Australian Research Council Project 'Legal Culture, Work Stress and Professional Practice: A Study of Australian Lawyers'. Before commencing her academic career, Dr Ananian-Welsh was as a litigation solicitor at DLA Piper Sydney and a legal officer at the Federal Attorney-General's Department. In 2013 Dr Ananian-Welsh was awarded a Law Faculty Teaching Award by the University of New South Wales and in 2011 was a finalist for the New South Wales Law Society 'Young Lawyer of the Year'.

Research Interests

  • Comparative Constitutional Law
  • Courts and Court Process
  • Constitutional Law
  • Legal Profession
  • National Security Law
  • Public Law
  • Torts
  • Crime and Corruption
  • Human and Civil Rights

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Arts, University of Wollongong
  • Bachelor of Law Honours, University of Wollongong
  • Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice, University of Wollongong
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of New South Wales

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Potential projects may concern:

    • Chapter III of the Australian Constitution.
    • Cases and principles concerning judicial independence in Australia (at state, territory or federal level) and/or elsewhere.
    • Contemporary challenges to judicial independence in Australia and/or elsewhere.
    • The principles and mechanisms by which judicial independence is protected.
    • The role and meaning of judicial independence.
    • Comparative studies in judicial independence.

    For further information contact Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, e:rebecca.aw@law.uq.edu.au.

  • Potential projects may concern:

    • Counter-terrorism laws and policies in Australia and/or elsewhere.
    • The longer term implications of 9/11.
    • The migration, normalisation and extension of national security laws, for example into the organised crime context.
    • The relationship between national security laws and facets of public law, such as judicial independence, federalism, representative government, open and equal justice, constitutional freedoms, and so on.

    For further information contact Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, e:rebecca.aw@law.uq.edu.au.

  • Potential projects may concern schemes that provide for preventive restraints to be placed on the liberty of persons. Such schemes include, for example:

    • Counter-terrorism preventive detention and control orders.
    • Organised crime control orders.
    • Preventive detention of serious offenders.
    • Mandatory sentencing.
    • Restrictions on associations between members of certain groups.

    Projects may consider preventive schemes from perspectives including, but not limited to:

    • Their effectiveness.
    • Their impact on traditional facets of public or criminal laws (for example, the traditional role of courts, equal and open justice, fair process, constitutional freedoms and principles, the presumption of innocence)
    • Their nature, prevalence and spread.

    For further information contact Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, e:rebecca.aw@law.uq.edu.au.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Potential projects may concern:

    • Chapter III of the Australian Constitution.
    • Cases and principles concerning judicial independence in Australia (at state, territory or federal level) and/or elsewhere.
    • Contemporary challenges to judicial independence in Australia and/or elsewhere.
    • The principles and mechanisms by which judicial independence is protected.
    • The role and meaning of judicial independence.
    • Comparative studies in judicial independence.

    For further information contact Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, e:rebecca.aw@law.uq.edu.au.

  • Potential projects may concern:

    • Counter-terrorism laws and policies in Australia and/or elsewhere.
    • The longer term implications of 9/11.
    • The migration, normalisation and extension of national security laws, for example into the organised crime context.
    • The relationship between national security laws and facets of public law, such as judicial independence, federalism, representative government, open and equal justice, constitutional freedoms, and so on.

    For further information contact Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, e:rebecca.aw@law.uq.edu.au.

  • Potential projects may concern schemes that provide for preventive restraints to be placed on the liberty of persons. Such schemes include, for example:

    • Counter-terrorism preventive detention and control orders.
    • Organised crime control orders.
    • Preventive detention of serious offenders.
    • Mandatory sentencing.
    • Restrictions on associations between members of certain groups.

    Projects may consider preventive schemes from perspectives including, but not limited to:

    • Their effectiveness.
    • Their impact on traditional facets of public or criminal laws (for example, the traditional role of courts, equal and open justice, fair process, constitutional freedoms and principles, the presumption of innocence)
    • Their nature, prevalence and spread.

    For further information contact Dr Rebecca Ananian-Welsh, e:rebecca.aw@law.uq.edu.au.