Dr Li-Ann Leow

UQ Development Fellow

School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
l.leow@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 56104

Overview

Dr Li-Ann Leow is a post-doctoral research fellow at the Centre for Sensorimotor Performance, at the University of Queensland, working with Associate Professor Tim Carroll, Associate Professor Stephan Riek, Aymar de Rugy and Dr Welber Marinovic. D Prior to working at UQ she completed a 2 year postdoctoral research fellowship at the Brain and Mind Institute, Western University (University of Western Ontario), working with Dr Jessica Grahn. Before that she pursued a doctoral research under the supervision of Geoff Hammond and Andrea Loftus at the University of Western Australia, examining how Parkinson's disease patients show in a selective deficit in retaining motor learning acquired from updating an internal model, despite intact ability to update an internal model during motor learning.

Research Interests

  • Motor control
  • Motor learning
  • Timing

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science, The University of Western Australia
  • Bachelor of Science with Second Class Honours, The University of Western Australia
  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Western Australia

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • We move to attain a more rewarding state (e.g., reaching for a cup of coffee). Our efficient patterns of movements are acquired through a lifetime of motor learning, however, we still do not fully understand the complexities of how motor learning occurs, and how the brain areas involved interact during motor learning, and how motor control is affected by rewards. Little is known about how we are able to acquire multiple motor skills at once, and exactly what mechanisms determine the longer-term consolidation and persistence of this learning.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Grants (Administered at UQ)

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • We move to attain a more rewarding state (e.g., reaching for a cup of coffee). Our efficient patterns of movements are acquired through a lifetime of motor learning, however, we still do not fully understand the complexities of how motor learning occurs, and how the brain areas involved interact during motor learning, and how motor control is affected by rewards. Little is known about how we are able to acquire multiple motor skills at once, and exactly what mechanisms determine the longer-term consolidation and persistence of this learning.