Ms Vanessa Glenn

Research Officer

Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation
Sustainable Minerals Institute
v.glenn@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 63138

Overview

I developed an interest in ecology when growing up in bushland on Brisbane's urban fringe, leading to my enrolment at UQ in a Bachelor of Applied Science (Environmental Science). I completed the degree with an honours project investigating urban fringe effects of elevated soil nutrients and weed invasion in wallum vegetation. As a graduate research assistant at CMLR, I helped to assess habitat requirements of the endangered Bridled Nailtail Wallaby. In the following years, I worked in Local Council (vegetation management on private land), with non-government groups and in the music industry, and then returned to CMLR in late 2008 as a Research Officer. I was the group's Laboratory Manager in 2010-11, responsible for the safe and efficient running of the CMLR laboratories, and am currently contributing to a range of research and support activities across the Centre, primarily as a field ecologist.

Qualifications

  • B App Sc (Env Sc) (Hons), The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Current student project available (would suit summer or winter scholar, undergraduate final year special study or Honours candidate), with Principal Supervisor Dr Sven Arnold.

    Off the shelf or do it yourself: Does the IKEA concept work for environmental monitoring?

    Estimates of tree condition variables are used in a variety of ecological and forestry applications, including assessment of tree health change associated with mine-related impacts. However, the degree of observer variation, the influence of leaf size and accuracy of in situ and ex situ assessments is not widely tested for environmental monitoring applications. This project aims to quantify uncertainties involved in vegetation monitoring programs arising from the subjective perception of surveyors. In this regard, the question remains whether skilled (e.g., field botanists) rather than unskilled surveyors (e.g., theoretical hydrologists) deliver more accurate and/or precise data. Likewise, it is of interest to discover how much the provision of training prior to field campaigns affects the accuracy of vegetation monitoring. The candidate will collect primary data and analyse them statistically based on a comprehensive literature review. Eventually, the findings are crucial to (i) quantify uncertainties and (ii) improve monitoring programs. The candidate should have an interest in collecting primary field data (e.g., canopy density) and the application of statistical tests. Opportunities exist for the candidate to develop skills in statistics and LAI software, environmental monitoring pilot studies and plant identification.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Current student project available (would suit summer or winter scholar, undergraduate final year special study or Honours candidate), with Principal Supervisor Dr Sven Arnold.

    Off the shelf or do it yourself: Does the IKEA concept work for environmental monitoring?

    Estimates of tree condition variables are used in a variety of ecological and forestry applications, including assessment of tree health change associated with mine-related impacts. However, the degree of observer variation, the influence of leaf size and accuracy of in situ and ex situ assessments is not widely tested for environmental monitoring applications. This project aims to quantify uncertainties involved in vegetation monitoring programs arising from the subjective perception of surveyors. In this regard, the question remains whether skilled (e.g., field botanists) rather than unskilled surveyors (e.g., theoretical hydrologists) deliver more accurate and/or precise data. Likewise, it is of interest to discover how much the provision of training prior to field campaigns affects the accuracy of vegetation monitoring. The candidate will collect primary data and analyse them statistically based on a comprehensive literature review. Eventually, the findings are crucial to (i) quantify uncertainties and (ii) improve monitoring programs. The candidate should have an interest in collecting primary field data (e.g., canopy density) and the application of statistical tests. Opportunities exist for the candidate to develop skills in statistics and LAI software, environmental monitoring pilot studies and plant identification.