Associate Professor Wayne Wilson

Associate Professor in Audiology

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
w.wilson@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 51797

Overview

Wayne Wilson is an Associate Professor and the Head of Audiology at the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The University of Queensland (UQ). He holds a PhD and Post-graduate Diploma in audiology and a BSc(Hons) in auditory physiology. Wayne's current research interests include auditory processing disorder (APD), the signal processing of auditory evoked potentials, and simulated learning environments. He has published over 70 papers in refereed scientific journals, 9 book chapters and 3 patents; given over 300 presentations at scientific conferences (including over 15 key-note/opening addresses) and professional and community meetings; and has secured over 30 competitive research grants totaling more than AUD$3 million.

Research Interests

  • Auditory processing and the development of the central auditory system
    In particular, the relationship between behavioural and electrophysiological tests of auditory processing. The use of the signal processing of auditory evoked signals described above allows this relationship to be examined in more detail. This information can then be used to obtain a better understanding of the auditory processing and its development theoretically, and to improve the sensitivity and specificity of auditory processing tests clinically.
  • The use of simulations in the training of audiology students
    In particular, the combined the use of standardised patients and computer simulations to improve the way we assess the clinical skills of 1st year audiology students. These tools could be used to teach students the basic skills required to conduct a standard audiological test battery on a co-operative adult client/patient. My research in this area aims to determine if these tools can be used to assess the clinical learning of students in the areas of propositional, professional craft and personal knowledge. If successful, I plan to use our data to argue for a new model of practical training for all audiology students both nationally and internationally.
  • The rapid acquisition of auditory evoked potentials
    In particular, the development of non-linear maximum length sequences to rapidly acquire auditory evoked potentials and the development of automated analysis protocols to rapidly analyse auditory evoked potentials. The time saved using these technologies can then be used to test more patients in less time and/or to perform more assessments in the same time to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the auditory evoked potentials to auditory dysfunction.
  • Signal processing of auditory evoked potentials
    In particular, the use of frequency and time-frequency analysis tools to decompose auditory evoked potentials into their constituent components. These components can then be examined for information not previously accessible in the original signal. This information can then be used to obtain a better understanding of the auditory evoked potentials theoretically, and to improve their sensitivity and specificity clinically.

Research Impacts

My research impact is reflected in the following achievements:

Research comment: My research publications have been widely reported by the general media, cited in national white papers, cited as an ‘all-round favourite in the diagnostic audiology literature’, been ranked in the top three most cited papers on specific topics in Thompson Reuters’ Web of Knowledge, been described in journal editorials as being “of considerable significance for both researchers and clinicians”, and published on national websites.

Influence on policy development and public practice: I have been invited to present more than 300 papers, seminars and workshops to various professional, government and community groups both nationally and internationally. This includes over 15 keynote/opening presentations at international and national conferences. Since 2003, my procedures (or variants there-of) for the management of central auditory processing in children and adults have been used by dozens of clinics throughout Australasia. Since 2013, I have led a Central Auditory Processing Disorder SPecial Interest Group that has grown to include members from around Australia, the production of an Australian English recording of the Staggered Spondaic Words test, along with an accompanying test manual and score sheet, for sale in Australia. This product is now being used by dozens of audiology clinics throughout Australia and New Zealand.

Patents:

Two published patents (Bradley, A.P., & Wilson, W.J. (2008). Method of Acquiring a Physiological Response. WO2008/006164. and Bradley, A.P., O’Brien, I., & Wilson, W.J. (2008). Active hearing protection device for orchestral and other musicians), and one provisional patent (Bradley, A.P., & Wilson, W.J. (2008). Improvements for cochlear implants, to the Australian Government’s IP Australia).

Involvement in spin-off companies: I am a founding member and continue to serve as the Chief Audiological Scientist of Ausonex Pty Ltd. Ausonex Pty Ltd is a medical device company specialising in the design and development of hearing test instrumentation utilizing core technology developed by Dr AP Bradley and myself at the University of Queensland. Ausonex has been awarded more than AUD$1 million in research grants, was one of seven finalists in the 2007 UQ Enterprize Awards for the project entitled “AusonexTM – Rapid Hearing Test” and was one of four winning teams in the 2006 Trailblazer Challenge (open category) held by UniQuest of The University of Queensland. I am a founding member and continue to serve as the Chief Audiologiscal Scientist of Fidelio. Fidelio is a hearing protection device group specialising in the design and development of active hearing protection devices for orchestral and other musicians utilising core technology developed by Dr AP Bradley, Mr Ian O’Brien and myself at the University of Queensland. Fidelio has been awarded more than AUD$25 000 in research grants and was a finalist in the 2008 Trailblazer Challenge (student category) held by UniQuest of The University of Queensland.

Media comment: I have been interviewed on national radio and in national and international papers and magazines on over 20 occasions on topics ranging from hearing to noise induced hearing loss to simulated learning environments.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of the Witwatersrand
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Audiology, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science - Physiology, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

View all Supervision

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Wilson, Wayne J. (2014). Could it be (central) auditory processing disorder ([C]APD). In Michael Valente and L. Maureen Valente (Ed.), Adult Audiology Casebook (pp. 133-136) New York, NY, USA: Thieme Medical Publishing.

  • Driscoll, Carlie J., McPherson, Bradley and Wilson, Wayne J. (2014). Hearing screening for school children. In Bradley McPherson and Carlie J. Driscoll (Ed.), School health screening systems: the complete perspective (pp. 63-94) New York, NY, United States: Nova Science Publishers.

  • Harvey, Lauren A. and Wilson, Wayne J. (2014). My hearing aids didn't help me at all. In Michael Valente and L. Maureen Valente (Ed.), Adult Audiology Casebook (pp. 79-84) New York, NY, USA: Theime Medical Publishers.

  • Wilson, Wayne J. and Malicka, Alicja (2014). Revisiting the reflexes. In Michael Valente and L. Maureen Valente (Ed.), Adult Audiology Casebook (pp. 130-132) New York , NY, USA: Thieme Medical Publishing.

  • Harvey, Lauren A. and Wilson, Wayne J. (2014). You really should see a doctor about that. In Michael Valente and L. Maureen Valente (Ed.), Adult Audiology Casebook (pp. 19-22) New York, NY, USA: Thieme Medical Publishing.

  • Wilson, W. J. (2013). Screening for central auditory processing disorder. In Frank E. Musiek and Gail D. Chermak (Ed.), Handbook of central auditory processing disorders: auditory neuroscience and diagnosis 2nd ed. (pp. 265-290) San Diego, CA, United States: Plural Publishing.

  • Wilson, Wayne (2012). Anatomy and physiology of the outer and middle ear in young infants. In Joseph Kei and Fei Zhao (Ed.), Assessing middle ear function in infants (pp. 1-16) San Diego, CA, U.S.A.: Plural Publishing.

  • Wilson, Wayne J. and Arnott, Wendy (2012). Evidence about effectiveness of central auditory processing intervention. In Lena Wong and Louise Hickson (Ed.), Evidence-based practice in audiology: Evaluating interventions for children and adults with hearing impairment (pp. 283-308) San Diego, CA, United States: Plural Publishing.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision