Dr Cecilia Gonzalez Tokman

ARC DECRA Fellow

Mathematics
Faculty of Science
cecilia.gt@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 53271

Overview

Research Interests

  • Dynamical Systems and Ergodic Theory

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Maryland

Publications

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Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • (2017) Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Topics available for student projects at PhD/Masters/Honours level include:

    (i) Non-autonomous or random dynamical systems. These systems model the evolution of phenomena affected by external influences, such as deterministic forcing or stationary noise. Topics under investigation include Lyapunov exponents, multiplicative ergodic theory, statistical behaviour and stability.

    (ii) Theoretical and computational analysis of metastable and coherent structures in dynamical systems. Such structures encode important information of the long term evolution and transport phenomena in the underlying system. For example, they are useful to identify, analyse and quantify features of natural phenomena such as oceanic eddies and atmospheric vortices.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Topics available for student projects at PhD/Masters/Honours level include:

    (i) Non-autonomous or random dynamical systems. These systems model the evolution of phenomena affected by external influences, such as deterministic forcing or stationary noise. Topics under investigation include Lyapunov exponents, multiplicative ergodic theory, statistical behaviour and stability.

    (ii) Theoretical and computational analysis of metastable and coherent structures in dynamical systems. Such structures encode important information of the long term evolution and transport phenomena in the underlying system. For example, they are useful to identify, analyse and quantify features of natural phenomena such as oceanic eddies and atmospheric vortices.