Professor Michele Haynes

Deputy Director (Research)

Institute for Social Science Research
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

Affiliate Professor Level E

UQ Poche Centre for Indigenous Health
m.haynes@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 69690

Overview

Professor Michele Haynes is a statistical methodologist with extensive experience working on contract research projects for government agencies, including the Australian Federal Police, Department of Social Services, the former Commonwealth Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA), Tasmania Department of Health and Housing, Queensland Electoral Commission and CSIRO.

Michele has published extensively in the areas of statistics, sociology and health, and has a high level of expertise in social statistics, including the analysis and modelling of complex longitudinal and multilevel survey data.

In addition to her roles as ISSR’s Deputy Director (Research) and leader of the Research Methods and Social Statistics program, Michele has influenced methodological development through her roles as:

• Executive Director for the Queensland node of the Australian Social Science Data Archive

• Chair of the Social Statistics Section of the Statistical Society of Australia

• Associate Editor for the Journal of the Royal Statistical Society – Series A (Statistics in Society)

• Visiting scholar at the Centre for Multilevel Modelling, University of Bristol

Research Interests

  • Development of methodology for the analysis of longitudinal and multilevel social data
  • Social and spatial drivers of employment transitions in Australia
  • Employment transitions of Australian women
  • Bayesian Estimation of Generalised Distributions with Application of Social Data
  • Bayesian Hierarchical Models for Longitudinal Social Survey Data
  • Generalised Linear Models for Multilevel Social Data

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Mathematics, University of Newcastle
  • Master of Scientific Studies, The University of Queensland
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Queensland University of Technology

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Up to four scholarships are available to suitably qualified, high-achieving Australian domestic students with a passion for research, to pursue PhD studies in environmental health sciences within the Queensland Alliance of Health Sciences (QAEHS) at the University of Queensland.

    QAEHS is a new university-wide multidisciplinary Centre, funded jointly by Queensland Health and the University of Queensland, to conduct research into all aspects of interactions between the environment and human health. Scholarships may be available in toxicology, microbiology, epidemiology, and integrated environmental health

    Eligibility requirements: Applicants must be eligible for enrolment as domestic students (Australian citizen or permanent resident, or New Zealand citizen). The minimum academic requirement is Honours Class 1 or equivalent, consistent with APA (Australian Postgraduate Award) requirements at the University of Queensland: see http://scholarships.uq.edu.au/scholarship/australian-postgraduate-award-apa

    Stipend: $26,288 per annum (2016 rate), indexed annually, tax-free for three years with a possible six month extension in approved circumstances.

    Dates: These scholarships are for commencement in early 2017. The recommended last date for applying online is 16 September 2016.

    Inquiries: To discuss specific topics and research areas, contact advisors directly

    Information about PhD enrolment/progression at UQ: see https://graduate-school.uq.edu.au/future-students/applying-research-higher-degree

    General inquiries: Ms Leanne Brennan l.brennan@uq.edu.au

    To apply: Applicants should contact potential advisors directly to initiate a conversation about specific projects and student-advisor match. See attached list, and the specific ISSR topics below. Once you have agreement in principle with an advisor, apply online at https://graduate-school.uq.edu.au/node/69/2#2 Please ensure that you specify in the free-text field QAEHS PhD Stipends. Note that this call is limited to four places, but you can also specify that, if unsuccessful, you wish to be considered in the general (UQ-wide) scholarship selection process.

    ENVIRONMENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    Professor Michele Haynes, m.haynes@uq.edu.au (http://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/1282), with

    Senior Research Fellow Dr Jason Ferris, j.ferris@uq.edu.au (http://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/2822) and

    Research Fellow Dr Danilo Bolano, d.bolano@uq.edu.au (http://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/13033)

    Professor Haynes, Dr Ferris and Dr Bolano provide expert supervision in environmental epidemiology. Professor Haynes is a statistician with over twenty years’ experience in the development and application of statistical methodology for the analysis of data, particularly in the social sciences. Dr Ferris is a statistician has over ten years of social science and public health research experience, with a strong focus on alcohol and drug research, sexual health, and adolescent health. Dr Bolano is a demographer and social statistician with expertise in quantitative methods for social sciences and longitudinal data analysis.

    Research topics include:

    • Clandestine drug labs and evaluation of remediation practices in Queensland

    • Waste-water analysis •Spatial analysis (e.g. alcohol outlet density, alley lighting changes) and population health harms

    • Social determinants of environmental and health risk exposure

    • Interrelationships between social processes, environmental exposure and health outcomes over the life course.

  • Non-response by participants and drop-out over time is typical of longitudinal social surveys. This results in patterns of missing data that may lead to biased results from standard analyses that aim to measure social change over time. Techniques such as multiple imputation and resampling have been proposed for missing data in large cross-sectional data sets. However, methods for dealing with missing data in longitudinal surveys are not so well developed. The primary aim of this project is to adapt these methods and to investigate weighting schemes for statistical models of longitudinal data, using data from various large population panel surveys in Australia The primary aim of this project is to adapt these methods and to investigate weighting schemes for statistical models of longitudinal data, using data from various large population panel survey in Australia such as the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) data. Eleven waves of data for the HILDA survey are now available and it is crucial that the most appropriate methods for dealing with missing data and weights in this context, are available to researchers. Weighting methods for different non-response and attrition patterns and their impact on statistical estimation will be explored using simulation studies.

    This project will be jointly supervised by Professor Michele Haynes (m.haynes@uq.edu.au) and Dr Bernard Baffour (b.baffour@uq.edu.au).

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Chesters, Jenny and Haynes, Michele (2016). Reproducing social inequality within comprehensive school systems: the case of Australia. In Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Sandra Buchholz, Jan Skopek and Moris Triventi (Ed.), Models of secondary education and social inequality : an international comparison (pp. 269-284) Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom: Edward Elgar . doi:10.4337/9781785367267.00027

  • Buchler, Sandra, Chesters, Jenny, Higginson, Angela and Haynes, Michele (2014). Adult learning in Australia: predictors and outcomes. In Hans-Peter Blossfeld, Elena Kilpi-Jakonen, Daniela Vono de Vilhena and Sandra Buchholz (Ed.), Adult learning in modern societies: an international comparison from a life-course perspective (pp. 98-118) Cheltenham, United Kingdom: Edward Elgar.

  • Baxter, Janeen, Hewitt, Belinda, Haynes, Michele and Western, Mark (2013). Pathways through the life course: The effect of relationship and parenthood transitions on domestic labour. In Ann Evans and Janeen Baxter (Ed.), Negotiating the Life Course: Stability and change in life pathways (pp. 145-160) New York: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-90-481-8912-0_8

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Up to four scholarships are available to suitably qualified, high-achieving Australian domestic students with a passion for research, to pursue PhD studies in environmental health sciences within the Queensland Alliance of Health Sciences (QAEHS) at the University of Queensland.

    QAEHS is a new university-wide multidisciplinary Centre, funded jointly by Queensland Health and the University of Queensland, to conduct research into all aspects of interactions between the environment and human health. Scholarships may be available in toxicology, microbiology, epidemiology, and integrated environmental health

    Eligibility requirements: Applicants must be eligible for enrolment as domestic students (Australian citizen or permanent resident, or New Zealand citizen). The minimum academic requirement is Honours Class 1 or equivalent, consistent with APA (Australian Postgraduate Award) requirements at the University of Queensland: see http://scholarships.uq.edu.au/scholarship/australian-postgraduate-award-apa

    Stipend: $26,288 per annum (2016 rate), indexed annually, tax-free for three years with a possible six month extension in approved circumstances.

    Dates: These scholarships are for commencement in early 2017. The recommended last date for applying online is 16 September 2016.

    Inquiries: To discuss specific topics and research areas, contact advisors directly

    Information about PhD enrolment/progression at UQ: see https://graduate-school.uq.edu.au/future-students/applying-research-higher-degree

    General inquiries: Ms Leanne Brennan l.brennan@uq.edu.au

    To apply: Applicants should contact potential advisors directly to initiate a conversation about specific projects and student-advisor match. See attached list, and the specific ISSR topics below. Once you have agreement in principle with an advisor, apply online at https://graduate-school.uq.edu.au/node/69/2#2 Please ensure that you specify in the free-text field QAEHS PhD Stipends. Note that this call is limited to four places, but you can also specify that, if unsuccessful, you wish to be considered in the general (UQ-wide) scholarship selection process.

    ENVIRONMENTAL EPIDEMIOLOGY

    Professor Michele Haynes, m.haynes@uq.edu.au (http://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/1282), with

    Senior Research Fellow Dr Jason Ferris, j.ferris@uq.edu.au (http://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/2822) and

    Research Fellow Dr Danilo Bolano, d.bolano@uq.edu.au (http://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/13033)

    Professor Haynes, Dr Ferris and Dr Bolano provide expert supervision in environmental epidemiology. Professor Haynes is a statistician with over twenty years’ experience in the development and application of statistical methodology for the analysis of data, particularly in the social sciences. Dr Ferris is a statistician has over ten years of social science and public health research experience, with a strong focus on alcohol and drug research, sexual health, and adolescent health. Dr Bolano is a demographer and social statistician with expertise in quantitative methods for social sciences and longitudinal data analysis.

    Research topics include:

    • Clandestine drug labs and evaluation of remediation practices in Queensland

    • Waste-water analysis •Spatial analysis (e.g. alcohol outlet density, alley lighting changes) and population health harms

    • Social determinants of environmental and health risk exposure

    • Interrelationships between social processes, environmental exposure and health outcomes over the life course.

  • Non-response by participants and drop-out over time is typical of longitudinal social surveys. This results in patterns of missing data that may lead to biased results from standard analyses that aim to measure social change over time. Techniques such as multiple imputation and resampling have been proposed for missing data in large cross-sectional data sets. However, methods for dealing with missing data in longitudinal surveys are not so well developed. The primary aim of this project is to adapt these methods and to investigate weighting schemes for statistical models of longitudinal data, using data from various large population panel surveys in Australia The primary aim of this project is to adapt these methods and to investigate weighting schemes for statistical models of longitudinal data, using data from various large population panel survey in Australia such as the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) data. Eleven waves of data for the HILDA survey are now available and it is crucial that the most appropriate methods for dealing with missing data and weights in this context, are available to researchers. Weighting methods for different non-response and attrition patterns and their impact on statistical estimation will be explored using simulation studies.

    This project will be jointly supervised by Professor Michele Haynes (m.haynes@uq.edu.au) and Dr Bernard Baffour (b.baffour@uq.edu.au).