Dr Sarah Wallace

Lecturer in Speech Pathology

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
s.wallace3@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 67453

Overview

Sarah conducts research in the field of aphasia rehabilitation.

Sarah is a lecturer in speech pathology and a certified practising speech pathologist. She has 15 years of experience working as a clinician, public servant, and researcher in public health, federal government, and university sectors. Sarah has expertise in the area of outcome measurement, developed throughout her doctoral research project to develop a core outcome set for aphasia treatment research. Sarah’s research has an international focus and she is a founding member of Aphasia United, an international peak body for aphasia organisations. Sarah has expertise in consensus building techniques, stakeholder engagement and the application of the World Health Organisation International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) to research.

Research Interests

  • Aphasia Rehabilitation
  • Core Outcome Set development
  • Consensus techniques and stakeholder engagement
  • Communication disability in ageing
  • The patient perspective
  • Outcome measurement

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosphy, The University of Queensland
  • Graduate Certificate in Gerontology, VIC
  • Bachelor of Speech Pathology, The University of Queensland

Publications

  • Wallace, Sarah J., Worrall, Linda, Rose, Tanya, Le Dorze, Guylaine, Breitenstein, Caterina, Hilari, Katerina, Babbitt, Edna, Bose, Arpita, Brady, Marian, Cherney, Leora R., Copland, David, Cruice, Madeline, Enderby, Pam, Hersh, Deborah, Howe, Tami, Kelly, Helen, Kiran, Swathi, Laska, Ann-Charlotte, Marshall, Jane, Nicholas, Marjorie, Patterson, Janet, Pearl, Gill, Rochon, Elizabeth, Rose, Miranda, Sage, Karen, Small, Steven and Webster, Janet (2018) A core outcome set for aphasia treatment research: the ROMA consensus statement. International Journal of Stroke, 174749301880620. doi:10.1177/1747493018806200

  • Nichol, Leana, Hill, Annie J., Wallace, Sarah J., Pitt, Rachelle and Rodriguez, Amy D. (2018) Exploring speech-language pathologists’ perspectives of aphasia self-management: a qualitative study. Aphasiology, 32 sup1: 1-3. doi:10.1080/02687038.2018.1470603

  • Rose, Tanya A., Balse, Anita, Osmond, Sarah, Poon, Angela, Simons, Natasha and Wallace, Sarah J. (2018) Aphasia education: speech-language pathologists’ perspectives regarding current and optimal practice. Aphasiology, 32 8: 967-988. doi:10.1080/02687038.2018.1472366

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Master Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Achieveing outcomes that are important to consumers is increasingly recognised as a key component of value in healthcare. This research aims to identify, evaluate and facilitate consensus regarding patient-reported outcome measures which could be used to gain the perspectives of people with post-stroke aphasia at different stages of their recovery.

  • In health research, there is growing recognition of the crucial role of outcome measurement in study design. Across a variety of health areas, Core Outcome Sets (COSs) have been, and are continuing to be, developed to increase consistency in outcome measurement. Improving Research Outcome Measurement in Aphasia (ROMA) is a program of research which aims to increase standardisation in research outcome measurement through the development and implementation of a core outcome set (COS) (an agreed, minimum set of outcomes and outcome measures).

    Aim: This research will explore current knowledge and practice; and barriers and facilitators to COS use within an implementation science framework.

  • Queensland Aphasia Rehabilitation Centre PhD Opportunities

    The University of Queensland is establishing the Queensland Aphasia Rehabilitation Centre (QARC), the first specialist aphasia research and rehabilitation centre in Australia. In partnership with Queensland Health, the QARC will deliver state-of-the-art services to people with aphasia and their families. Two UQ funded PhD scholarships are available to study topics related to the development and activities of the QARC. Potential areas include: investigating the effectiveness and clinical implementation of UQ LIFT (Language Impairment and Function Therapy), cost-effectiveness of aphasia rehabilitation, unmet need of people with aphasia, co-design of aphasia centres, measuring the success of aphasia interventions in clinical practice, student-led aphasia treatment programs, and telerehabilitation.

    These projects would suit candidates with a background in speech pathology, psychology, or health economics / public health.

    For more information contact Professor David Copland (d.copland@uq.edu.au) or Dr Sarah Wallace (s.wallace3@uq.edu.au).

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Worrall, Linda, Rose, Tanya, Brandenburg, Caitlin, Rohde, Alexia, Berg, Karianne and Wallace, Sarah J. (2016). Aphasia in later life. In A. N. Pachana (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Geropsychology (pp. 1-7) Singapore: Springer Singapore. doi:10.1007/978-981-287-080-3_346-1

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Master Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Achieveing outcomes that are important to consumers is increasingly recognised as a key component of value in healthcare. This research aims to identify, evaluate and facilitate consensus regarding patient-reported outcome measures which could be used to gain the perspectives of people with post-stroke aphasia at different stages of their recovery.

  • In health research, there is growing recognition of the crucial role of outcome measurement in study design. Across a variety of health areas, Core Outcome Sets (COSs) have been, and are continuing to be, developed to increase consistency in outcome measurement. Improving Research Outcome Measurement in Aphasia (ROMA) is a program of research which aims to increase standardisation in research outcome measurement through the development and implementation of a core outcome set (COS) (an agreed, minimum set of outcomes and outcome measures).

    Aim: This research will explore current knowledge and practice; and barriers and facilitators to COS use within an implementation science framework.

  • Queensland Aphasia Rehabilitation Centre PhD Opportunities

    The University of Queensland is establishing the Queensland Aphasia Rehabilitation Centre (QARC), the first specialist aphasia research and rehabilitation centre in Australia. In partnership with Queensland Health, the QARC will deliver state-of-the-art services to people with aphasia and their families. Two UQ funded PhD scholarships are available to study topics related to the development and activities of the QARC. Potential areas include: investigating the effectiveness and clinical implementation of UQ LIFT (Language Impairment and Function Therapy), cost-effectiveness of aphasia rehabilitation, unmet need of people with aphasia, co-design of aphasia centres, measuring the success of aphasia interventions in clinical practice, student-led aphasia treatment programs, and telerehabilitation.

    These projects would suit candidates with a background in speech pathology, psychology, or health economics / public health.

    For more information contact Professor David Copland (d.copland@uq.edu.au) or Dr Sarah Wallace (s.wallace3@uq.edu.au).

  • Aphasia (impaired language and communication) occurs in up to 40% of stroke patients. Aphasia has a greater negative impact on quality of life than other common conditions including cancer and dementia. It is associated with increased depression and decreased employment and causes major psychological distress for the person with aphasia and their family and friends. In Australia, these outcomes are further compounded by health inequalities in regional areas. Regional Australians are both more likely to have a stroke and less likely to access specialist stroke services associated with improved patient outcomes. Despite the poor outcomes experienced by people with aphasia and the inequities inherent in service provision across Australia, little is known about the unmet service needs of this population or their preferences for future service development. A qualitative, multi-site, multi-stakeholder nominal group technique study will be used to identify and gain consensus on priorities for aphasia services in Queensland. The identified service priorities will be used to drive the development of Australia’s first dedicated aphasia rehabilitation and research centre, optimising outcomes for people with aphasia and their significant others.