Associate Professor Sabine Matook

Associate Professor

School of Business
Faculty of Business, Economics and Law
s.matook@business.uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 68049

Overview

Dr Sabine Matook is an Associate Professor in Information Systems at the UQ Business School, University of Queensland. She received her doctoral degree from the Technische Universität (TU) Dresden, Germany.

Sabine Matook's research interests are in agile information systems development, human behaviour in online social networks, and the IT artifact.

She is an Associate Editor with the European Journal of Information Systems and was a track chair with ICIS 2015 (Managing IS Projects and IS Development).

She has held visiting positions at the University of Arizona (Eller College of Management), Georgia State University, University of Louisville, Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration, Austria, and at the University of La Serena, Chile. Dr Matook's work has appeared in the European Journal of Information Systems, Information Systems Journal, the Journal of Strategic Information Systems, Information & Management, the International Journal of Operations & Production Management, Decision Support Systems, and the Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems. Dr Matook has presented research papers at a variety of international conferences, including the International Conference on Information Systems.

Research Interests

  • Agile Information Systems Development
    This research field focuses on the software development under the agile methodology paradigm. I study interpersonal relationships and particularly commercial friendships in agile teams, governance mechanisms for the team, critical success factors in agile ISD, lean agile development, issues related to distributed development teams and team performance.
  • Human Behaviour in Online Social Networks
    This research field focuses on social media and particularly online social networks as a technology for humans for their leisure and work. I examine behaviour of collectives and individuals in online social networks, the use and adoption of the technology, change is network structures over time, and possibilities for innovative usage.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, T.U.Dresden
  • Diploma of Business Administration, T.U.Dresden
  • Master of Business Administration, T.U.Dresden

Publications

View all Publications

Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Agile development is praised as a method that superiorly handles rapid and constant change in all aspects of the development process. It requires that the team possesses high levels of trust and can rely blindly on each other’s knowledge and skills. As a result, very little knowledge is codified in documents and rahter resides with the individual. Thereby team members need to be able to tranform the disruptive changes into positive energy for the development process and product. At the same time, a newly formed team lags the trust necessary to be high performing and able to manage the frequent change demands from the beginning of the project.

    Little research exists about questions such as those below which could be the topic for a higher degree research thesis (MPhil or PhD).

    Potential Thesis Questions:

    1) How can an agile software development team become early on a high-performance team?

    2) What factors increase and decrease team performance in agile teams?

    3) Why and how do agile software development teams outperform traditional-waterfall development teams?

    Please contact Dr Sabine Matook if you are interested in pursuing one of the outlined research topics in a higher research degree program with the UQ Business School.

  • Agile development is a development method that focuses on the team and their interactions as a means to develop software under conductions of frequent changes in project scope and customer requirements. Agile software development teams are small, cohesive teams (seven to nine professionals) that develop software in weekly iterations in a collaborative manner with little formal control. These team members are highly intrinsic motivated to achieve their shared goal of delivering software to satisfy customer needs.

    Little research exists about questions such as those below which could be the topic for a higher degree research thesis (MPhil or PhD).

    Potential Thesis Questions:

    1) What factors contribute and impair the formation of different workplace relationships in agile software development teams and what is their impact on team performance?

    2) How does an agile software team ensure motivation and avoid effort-withholding of their team members?

    3) What aspects of the agile method and workplace relationships impact on the flow of development critical information in and out of the team?

    Please contact Dr Sabine Matook if you are interested in pursuing one of the outlined research topics in a higher research degree program with the UQ Business School.

  • Worldwide, more than half of all Internet users regularly use social media applications to connect, interact, and exchange information online with others. Social media applications, such as Facebook and Twitter, have emerged to satisfy the desire of people to form and maintain personal relationships online. However, not all online relationships are lasting and a user’s behaviors may positively and negatively affect different aspects of any online relationships.

    Little research exists about questions such as those below which could be the topic for a higher degree research thesis (MPhil or PhD).

    Potential Thesis Questions:

    1) What factors – for example physical appearance or similar interests – impact on the formation of an interpersonal relationship in an online environment?

    2) How do people decide who to add as a ‘friend’ and thus, give access to their online social media network?

    3) What behaviors but also characteristics, e.g., personality affect on how people use social media?

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Butler, Brian S. and Matook, Sabine (2015). Social media and relationships. In The international encyclopaedia of digital communication and society (pp. ---) London, United Kingdom: John Wiley & Sons. doi:10.1002/9781118767771.wbiedcs097

  • Vidgen, Richard, Donnellan, Brian, Matook, Sabine and Conboy, Kieran (2012). Design science approach to measure productivity in agile software development. In Markus Helfert and Brian Donnellan (Ed.), Practical aspects of design science: European Design Science Symposium revised selected papers (pp. 171-177) Heidelberg, Germany: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-642-33681-2_15

  • Zumpe, S. and Esswein, W. (2002). Quality Levels of Electronic B2B Marketplaces. In Weinhardt, Christof and Holtmann, Carsten (Ed.), E-Commerce: Netze, Markte, Technologien (pp. 117-126) Germany: Physica Verlag.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

  • Matook, Sabine, Soltani, Sheida and Maruping, Likoebe (2016). Self-organization in agile ISD teams and the influence on exploration and exploitation. In: International Conference on Information Systems, Dublin, Ireland, (). 11-14 December 2016.

  • Matook, Sabine and Vidgen, Richard (2014). Harmonizing critical success factors in agile ISD projects. In: Smart Sustainability: The Information Systems Opportunity. AMCIS 2014: 20th Americas Conference on Information Systems, Savannah, GA, United States, (). 7-10 August 2014.

  • Madlberger, Maria and Matook, Sabine (2012). Creation of utilitarian value with online and offline transaction phases. In: CONF-IRM 2012 proceedings. International Conference on Information Resources Management (CONF-IRM), Vienna, Austria, (13.1-13.11). 21 - 23 May 2012.

  • Madsen, Sabine and Matook, Sabine (2010). Conceptualizing interpersonal relationships in agile IS development. In: ICIS 2010 Proceedings. International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS) 2010, Saint Louis, Missouri, U.S.A., (). 12-15 December 2010.

  • Krell, Katharina, Matook, Sabine and Rohde, Fiona (2009). The effects of regulatory pressure on information system adoption success: An institutional theory perspective. In: S.Newell, E. Whitley, N. Pouloudi, J. Wareham and L. Mathiassen, Proceedings of the 17th European Conference on Information Systems. European Conference on Information Systems, Verona, Italy, (1-12). 8-10 June 2009.

  • Matook, Sabine and Brown, Susan A. (2008). Conceptualizing the IT artifact for MIS research. In: D. Te'eni and F. Rowe, ICIS 2008 Proceedings. 24th International Conference on Information Systems ICIS 2008, Paris, (1-11). 14-17 December 2008.

  • Zumpe, Sabine and Kautz, Karlheinz (2008). In search of information systems development theory: A framework to understand agile software development in practice. In: Asproth, V., Axelsson, K., Holmberg, S., Ihlstroem, C., Lindblad-Gidlund, K. and Sundgren, B., 31st Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandanavia - Public systems in the future - possibilities, challenges and pitfalls. 31st Information Systems Research Seminar in Scandanavia, Ostersund, Sweden, (1-14). 10-13 August, 2008.

  • Kautz, Karlheinz and Zumpe, Sabine (2008). Just enough structure at the edge of chaos: Agile information system development in practice. In: Abrahamsson, P., Baskerville, R., Conboy, K., Fitzgerald, B., Morgan, L. and Wang, X., Agile Processes in Software Engineering and Extreme Programming: 9th International Conference, XP 2008. 9th International Conference on Agile Processes and eXtreme Programming in Software Engineering, XP 2008, Limerick, Ireland, (137-146). 10-14 June, 2008. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-68255-4_14

  • Matook, Sabine and Kautz, Karlheinz (2008). Mindfulness and agile software development. In: P. Cragg and A. Mills, 19th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (ACIS) - Creating the Future: Transforming Research into Practice. 19th Australasian Conference on Information Systems (ACIS), Christchurch, New Zealand, (638-647). 3-5 December 2008.

  • Krell, Katharina and Matook, Sabine (2008). On the impact of strategic planning on mandatory IS investments. In: J. Parsons, AMCIS 2008 Proceedings. 14th Americas Conference on Information Systems AMCIS 2008, Toronto, Canada, (1-9). 14-17 August 2008.

  • Krell, Katharina, Matook, Sabine and Rohde, Fiona (2008). Understanding information system change: The relationship between reasons, goals, and types. In: W. Huang and H.H. Teo, Proceedings of the 2008 Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems - Leveraging ICT for Resilient Organizations and Sustainable Growth in the Asia Pacific Region. Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems PACIS 2008, Suzhou, China, (1202-1213). 3-7 July 2008.

  • Zumpe, S. and Madlberger, M. (2007). A transaction-based framework for business models in electronic commerce. In: Tan, F. B., Thong, J. and Janczewski, L. J., Proceedings of the 11th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (PACIS 2007). 11th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems, Auckland, New Zealand, (106-121). 4-6 July, 2007.

  • Zumpe, Sabine and Van der Heijden, Hans (2007). On the use of variable user goals to measure perceived usefulness. In: H. Öesterle, J. Schelp and R. Winter, Proceedings of the Fifteenth European Conference on Information Systems. Fifteenth European Conference on Information Systems, University of St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland, (1334-1343). 7-9 June, 2007.

  • Zumpe, Sabine and Ihme, Diana (2006). Information systems maturity in e-business organizations. In: J. Ljungberg and M. Andersson, Proceedings of the Fourteenth European Conference on Information Systems. European Conference on Information Systems, Gotteborg, Sweden, (1703-1710). 12-14 June, 2006.

  • Zumpe, S. and van der Heijden, H. (2006). Integrating variable user goals into user acceptance models. In: M. Schoop, Proceedings of RSEEM 2006: 13th Research Symposium on Emerging Electronic Markets. Research Symposium on Emerging Electronic Markets, Stuttgart, Germany, (). 23-25 September, 2006.

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Agile development is praised as a method that superiorly handles rapid and constant change in all aspects of the development process. It requires that the team possesses high levels of trust and can rely blindly on each other’s knowledge and skills. As a result, very little knowledge is codified in documents and rahter resides with the individual. Thereby team members need to be able to tranform the disruptive changes into positive energy for the development process and product. At the same time, a newly formed team lags the trust necessary to be high performing and able to manage the frequent change demands from the beginning of the project.

    Little research exists about questions such as those below which could be the topic for a higher degree research thesis (MPhil or PhD).

    Potential Thesis Questions:

    1) How can an agile software development team become early on a high-performance team?

    2) What factors increase and decrease team performance in agile teams?

    3) Why and how do agile software development teams outperform traditional-waterfall development teams?

    Please contact Dr Sabine Matook if you are interested in pursuing one of the outlined research topics in a higher research degree program with the UQ Business School.

  • Agile development is a development method that focuses on the team and their interactions as a means to develop software under conductions of frequent changes in project scope and customer requirements. Agile software development teams are small, cohesive teams (seven to nine professionals) that develop software in weekly iterations in a collaborative manner with little formal control. These team members are highly intrinsic motivated to achieve their shared goal of delivering software to satisfy customer needs.

    Little research exists about questions such as those below which could be the topic for a higher degree research thesis (MPhil or PhD).

    Potential Thesis Questions:

    1) What factors contribute and impair the formation of different workplace relationships in agile software development teams and what is their impact on team performance?

    2) How does an agile software team ensure motivation and avoid effort-withholding of their team members?

    3) What aspects of the agile method and workplace relationships impact on the flow of development critical information in and out of the team?

    Please contact Dr Sabine Matook if you are interested in pursuing one of the outlined research topics in a higher research degree program with the UQ Business School.

  • Worldwide, more than half of all Internet users regularly use social media applications to connect, interact, and exchange information online with others. Social media applications, such as Facebook and Twitter, have emerged to satisfy the desire of people to form and maintain personal relationships online. However, not all online relationships are lasting and a user’s behaviors may positively and negatively affect different aspects of any online relationships.

    Little research exists about questions such as those below which could be the topic for a higher degree research thesis (MPhil or PhD).

    Potential Thesis Questions:

    1) What factors – for example physical appearance or similar interests – impact on the formation of an interpersonal relationship in an online environment?

    2) How do people decide who to add as a ‘friend’ and thus, give access to their online social media network?

    3) What behaviors but also characteristics, e.g., personality affect on how people use social media?

  • Companies worldwide discover online social media applications as a means to get closer to their consumers and connect with suppliers and customers more easily. Social media communities are used to develop software collaboratively, to promote a new product via Facebook, or hire a financial manager through LinkedIn. Despite the various benefits that stem from social media use, it bears risks and challenges for companies and users alike. Nevertheless, social software applications have become an integral part for individuals and companies – now they need to know how to explore, manage, and exploit social media to benefit from them and generate value.

    Little research exists about questions such as those below which could be the topic for a higher degree research thesis (MPhil or PhD).

    Potential Thesis Questions:

    1. What benefits can users and companies generate from their memberships in different social media applications?

    2. How are social integration, trust, and closeness achieved in anonymous social media applications, such as open source software communities and healthcare communities?

    3. What is the role of social media in a company’s supplier and customer relationship strategy?