Associate Professor Kathryn Steadman

Associate Professor

School of Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences

Affiliated Associate Professor

Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
k.steadman@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 61886

Overview

I completed a Bachelor of Pharmacy at Kings College London, graduating in 1991, followed by pre-registration and subsequent employment as a pharmacist with Boots the Chemists in Central London. I then undertook a PhD in plant biochemistry with Royal Holloway College, University of London, and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, followed by postdoctoral research positions at Cornell University, USA and The University of Western Australia.

At the end of 2006 I moved to the School of Pharmacy at The University of Queensland as a Senior Lecturer and was promoted in 2011 to Associate Professor. I was the Chair of Teaching and Learning for the School between 2009 and 2011. I am also an affiliate of the Centre for Plant Science and the Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences within the Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI).

Research Interests

  • Nutraceutical/pharmaceutical/medicinal components of plants and their seeds
    Plants contain a wide range of secondary compounds that may be useful as a medicinal or pharmaceutical product in the purified form, or as a nutraceutical or herbal remedy if used in a less refined form. Previous work in this area includes isolation and identification of novel galactosyl-inositols from buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) seeds that may have a role in treatment or prevention of type II diabetes, and investigating the stimulant methylxanthine components of guarana, which is prepared from Paullinia cupana seeds. Current research projects investigate natural products for bioactive or pharmaceutically valuable components, such as the alkaloids and related chemicals in Australian Nicotiana chewed for its nicotine as 'pituri' by the central desert aboriginal population.
  • Seeds in drug delivery
    As seeds can be stored for many years under dry conditions, essential nutrients and medicinal compounds produced by them can be stored and transported cheaply, and potentially dosed without further purification. Seeds may be used as a vehicle for protein drug delivery, removing the need to extract and formulate the protein product. Current research investigates the potential for the use of sorghum, an economically important summer crop in Australia, as a drug delivery agent in itself or as a source of components that may be extracted for use in formulations.
  • Physiology and biochemistry of germination control within seeds
    Seed germination is an essential step in the production of a plant, whether for nutritional, pharmaceutical or ecological purposes. Research is directed at a physiological level towards understanding, controlling and predicting seed germination. This has included an ARC Discovery project investigating a novel phytochrome-regulated dormancy mechanism in Lolium rigidum and an ARC Linkage project directed at controlling and predicting seed germination of Australian natives required for minesite revegetation. Current research includes an ARC Linkage project investigating Australian Alpine species and a project investigating complex seed dormancy issues in Tasmanian plants.
  • Physiology and biochemistry of processes involved in seed longevity
    The majority of species produce seeds that have the ability to withstand extremely dry conditions for many years, retaining viability in order to germinate when provided with water at some later point in time. This enables germplasm storage for future use, conserving the biodiversity that may one day provide us with important lead compounds in drug discovery. Past research has included investigating the link between carbohydrate composition and seed longevity, the role of maternal environment, harvest and storage conditions on seed longevity, and the relationship between seed ageing in the soil vs. controlled storage.

Qualifications

  • PhD, University of London
  • Bachelor Pharmacy Honours, University of London

Publications

View all Publications

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Note for students: Associate Professor Kathryn Steadman is not currently available to take on new students.

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision