Dr Songlin Wu

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation
Sustainable Minerals Institute

Overview

Dr Songlin Wu is currently a postdoctoral research fellow, within Environment Centres (CMLR), Sustainable minerals institute (SMI), in the University of Queensland. Songlin graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Environmental science (environmental chemistry direction), PhD in ecology (soil remediation and ecological restoration). Songlin’s PhD work had well demonstrated the detailed biogeochemical processes of Cr in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbioses by employing various microspectroscopic technologies.

QUALIFICATION

B.Sc (Environmental sciences), PhD (Ecology)

STUDY EXPERIENCE

09, 2006 — 06, 2010

B.S. in Environmental Science (Environmental chemistry direction)

College of Environmental and Resource Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun 130012, People’s Republic of China

09, 2010 — 01, 2016

Ph.D. in Ecology

State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China

WORK EXPERIENCE

01, 2016 — 08, 2016

Research assistant (Physiological mechanisms of chromium resistance of AM symbioses)

Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, People’s Republic of China

09, 2016 —03, 2017

Postdoctoral researcher (interactions between nZVI and soil microbes)

Department of Environmental Geosciences, Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamycká 129, Prague 6−Suchdol 165 21, Czech Republic

03, 2017—now

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Sustainable Minerals Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072, AUSTRALIA

Research Interests

  • Biogeochemistry in plant-microbial-tailing system
    Tailings usually consists of finely ground mineral particles, soluble salts, and has an extreme pH and EC, and poor physical structures. Besides, it lacks organic matters and essential mineral nutrients, as well as functional microbes. Some tailings even has high concentrations of toxic metal(loid)s. All these physical and chemical drawbacks restrains the colonization of plants. Some soil microbes like mycorrhizal fungi and plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) are widely distributed in the environments with low nutrient availability and high salt (or drought) stress, and can help plants survival in those harsh environment and assist in key mineral nutrient acquisition by plants. Therefore, they have a great potential in plant colonization in various tailings. Once plants colonize in tailings, the root activity can greatly drive mineral weathering and facilitate soil aggregation, contributing to soil formation from tailings. Songlin’s interests lie in the role of those beneficial microbes in plant survival in tailings, and their further functions towards soil aggregation, as well as the underlying mechanisms. He is interested in employing newly advanced technologies such as high resolution scanning/transmission electron microscopy (HR-SEM/TEM), X-ray microtomography (μ-CT), as well as synchrotron based micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy (μ-XAS), micro-focused X ray fluorescence (μ-XRF), scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), and micro fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (μ-FTIR) etc in the study of the detailed biogeochemical processes in microbial-mineral and mineral-organic interface. The study aims to provide basis for development of technologies towards soil formation from tailings, and to give new insights into the fundamental study of soil development and ecological restoration in the tailing area.

Research Impacts

Dr Songlin Wu’s current research is closely collaborated with some tailing Ltds, such as Karara Mining Ltd in West Australia. He is working within a large ARC-Linkage project that aims to investigate soil formation in magnetite tailings to offset large proportions of soil volumes required to cover the tailings for native plant rehabilitation.

Qualifications

  • Doctor oh Philosophy, University of the Chinese Academy of Science

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Sustainable rehabilitation of tailings at metal mine sites is severely constrained by soil resource deficiency. Building on our recent findings of critical processes in soil formation from Cu/Pb-Zn tailings, we aim to develop an integrated technology through eco-engineering the mineralogy and organic constituents of tailings to initiate and accelerate soil formation by using magnetite tailings as a template. The technology will be underpinned by research to mediate and stimulate key biogeochemical and rhizosphere processes in the tailing-soil towards a functional 'technosol'. We aim to apply this technology at metal mines in Australia, to offset the soil required for rehabilitating tailings landforms with native plant communities.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Sustainable rehabilitation of tailings at metal mine sites is severely constrained by soil resource deficiency. Building on our recent findings of critical processes in soil formation from Cu/Pb-Zn tailings, we aim to develop an integrated technology through eco-engineering the mineralogy and organic constituents of tailings to initiate and accelerate soil formation by using magnetite tailings as a template. The technology will be underpinned by research to mediate and stimulate key biogeochemical and rhizosphere processes in the tailing-soil towards a functional 'technosol'. We aim to apply this technology at metal mines in Australia, to offset the soil required for rehabilitating tailings landforms with native plant communities.