Dr Asad Khan

Snr Lecturer in Stat & Res Design

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
a.khan2@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 67456

Overview

Asad has been with the University of Queensland since 2006. Prior to this, he has held academic appointments in statistics at the University of Sydney and the University of Dhaka. His current research involves evaluation and development of statistical methods in analysing ordinal outcomes. His applied research focuses on epidemiology of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their inter-relationships with health and wellbeing.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science, University of Dhaka
  • Master of Science, University of Dhaka
  • Master of Public Health, The University of Sydney
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of New England

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Physical inactivity and sedentariness may be deleterious for health and wellbeing of individuals. Understanding the distribution and determinants (i.e., epidemiology) of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their interrelationships can have considerable public health implications in societies where sedentary and inactive lifestyles have become more prevalent. Furthermore, it would be useful to examine whether physical activity can attenuate or even eliminate the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviours on individuals’ health and psychosocial wellbeing. This research will explore patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, links with physical and psychosocial wellbeing, and if activity can offset potentially detrimental effects of prolonged sedentariness.

  • Patient reported outcomes are widely used in health and rehabilitation sciences. These outcomes are often assessed using different rating scales, which result in ordinal outcome data. Although there are demonstrated advantages of Rasch-based modelling, over the classical methods, such modelling has received a little attention in health and medical research in analysing ordinal outcomes. Additional evidence needs to be generated to demonstrate the inferential costs of using classical methods in analysing ordinal outcomes, which in turn can further strengthen the argument for using Rasch-based modelling. This work will also facilitate the development of guidelines for statistical analyses of rating scale ordinal outcomes.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Joint Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Physical inactivity and sedentariness may be deleterious for health and wellbeing of individuals. Understanding the distribution and determinants (i.e., epidemiology) of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their interrelationships can have considerable public health implications in societies where sedentary and inactive lifestyles have become more prevalent. Furthermore, it would be useful to examine whether physical activity can attenuate or even eliminate the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviours on individuals’ health and psychosocial wellbeing. This research will explore patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, links with physical and psychosocial wellbeing, and if activity can offset potentially detrimental effects of prolonged sedentariness.

  • Patient reported outcomes are widely used in health and rehabilitation sciences. These outcomes are often assessed using different rating scales, which result in ordinal outcome data. Although there are demonstrated advantages of Rasch-based modelling, over the classical methods, such modelling has received a little attention in health and medical research in analysing ordinal outcomes. Additional evidence needs to be generated to demonstrate the inferential costs of using classical methods in analysing ordinal outcomes, which in turn can further strengthen the argument for using Rasch-based modelling. This work will also facilitate the development of guidelines for statistical analyses of rating scale ordinal outcomes.