Dr Helen Haydon

Research Fellow

Centre for Health Services Research
Faculty of Medicine
h.haydon@uq.edu.au
+61 7 3176 4462

Overview

Helen works across a range of projects in both the research and consultancy arms of the Centre for Online Health, Centre for Health Services Research. Her focus is on the effective use of technology to increase access to health interventions (e.g. online psychoeducational tools for carers; telehealth implementation, telemental health and allied health) and increasing health literacy in the community (e.g. dementia knowledge and digital health). She is particularly interested in using health technology to promote quality end-of-life care. Her current projects aim to increase care closer to home for people with dementia and with life-limiting illnesses (e.g. telepalliative care). Current research projects focus on: evaluation of telepalliative care services (e.g. patient/ carer outcomes and perceptions and staff perceptions); mental health interventions via telehealth and social media and; online psychoeducational support for carers of people with primary brain tumours in order to increase quality of life and mental wellbeing.

Helen coordinates a range of COH consultancy projects.

Helen’s previous research has focused on: cultural and social influences on addictive behaviours; social media, ageing and mental health; substance use and schizophrenic disorders and; developmental psychology and parenting. Her PhD examined the cultural, social and psychosocial influences on women’s alcohol-related decision-making.

She is a Registered Psychologist with clinical experience working with a range of issues and diverse populations and has over ten years’ experience teaching and facilitating workshops on psychology and health communication.

Research Interests

  • Palliative Telehealth Services
    I am involved in several projects implementing and evaluating telepalliative care services. Part of which examines clinician self-efficacy, impacts on patients and their family; clinicians and the health service.

Research Impacts

Year

Impact measures

2022

Course leader for the Australia Awards in Indonesia - Upskilling Indonesian government and industry personnel in digital health implementation and evaluation.

Developed and facilitated a telementoring Palliative Care service reaching national and international participants.

2021

Co-developed a telementoring dementia service with Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council services

2020

Involvement in the delivery of numerous webinars to support the rapid uptake of telehealth during COVID-19. These included a recorded webinar for the Western Queensland PHN and the Centre for Online Health Telehealth Forum which reached people across Australia and overseas. I am also involved in webinars and podcasts, planned for September, for two multinational pharmaceutical companies.

Supporting the use of telehealth through online publishing and promotion of Quick Guides for Telehealth (Caffery, Hobson, Mothershaw, Haydon, Snoswell, Thomas, Zurynski, Smith K-L, Clay & Smith AC). https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:6eb6f3b These quick guides continue to support clinicians and patients in effective engagement in telehealth services during COVID-19 restrictions. In July, 2020 alone, the COH Quick Guides page received 368 visits. The link to these guides have been embedded in numerous other industry webpages including: Digital Health CRC Telehealth Hub https://digitalhealthcrc.com/telehealth/clinicians/; Australasian Telehealth Society COVID-19 Telehealth Guides http://www.aths.org.au/covid-19-telehealth-guides/; International Society of Telemedicine and eHealth COVID-19 information and resources https://www.isfteh.org/news/isfteh_covid_19_information_and_resources; Statewide telepalliative care site will reference on their webpage https://palliative.tools/ruralqld/ (webpage update pending, June 2020); Primary Health Network (PHN) Tasmania, https://www.primaryhealthtas.com.au/for-health-professionals/novel-coronavirus-response/; and in the industry newsletter PulseIT Technology Resources. There have been several requests to reissue them from both national and international organisations and they have been incorporated into a range of resource lists and guidelines including the Australian Medical Association, https://ama.com.au/article/covid-19-resources-general-practices. Fin

Highlighting the use of telehealth during COVID-19 restrictions in a Croakey article, Snoswell, Mehrotra, Thomas, Smith K, Haydon, Caffery & Smith AC. "Making the most of telehealth in COVID-19 responses, and beyond" March 2020 https://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:3d6cf9d

2019

UQ Partners in Research Excellence Award - Commendation

Atom Film Award Finalist – Co-Director of DREAMT: Using telehealth to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People with dementia

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Psychology (Honours), Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Psychology, Queensland University of Technology

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Using strict eligibility criteria, Voluntary Assisted Dying (VAD) laws are now passed in all Australian states. VAD permits an eligible person with a terminal illness to end their life through either self-administration or practitioner-administration of a VAD medication. VAD enables “people who are suffering and dying to choose the manner and timing of their death”. Although choice is a central tenet of VAD, people living in rural and remote locations lack choice if local health services are not providers.

    Telehealth effectively increases access to healthcare for such underserved populations. However, under federal legislation it may be a criminal offence for clinicians to discuss VAD via telehealth. Clinicians are uncertain about how to support people in rural and remote communities. Overseas, when appropriate, telehealth supports people to access VAD. This research investigates the impact of using (or not using) telehealth as a means of accessing VAD services on clinicians and consumers.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

  • Gallegos-Rejas, Victor M., Kelly, Jaimon T., Lucas, Karen, Snoswell, Centaine L., Haydon, Helen M., Pager, Sue, Smith, Anthony C. and Thomas, Emma (2022). Telehealth utilisation in a diverse region in Queensland, Australia: A cross-sectional study. Successes and Failures in Telehealth Conference 2022 (SFT-2022), Brisbane, QLD Australia, 9-11 November 2022.

  • Snoswell, C., Smith, A., Broadbent, A., Brydon, J. A., Thomas, E., Caffery, L. and Haydon, H. (2021). Adding telehealth to a community palliative care service: a cost-consequence analysis. 21st Successes and Failures in Telehealth conference 2021 (SFT-2021), Online, 3 - 5 November 2021. Brisbane, QLD, Australia: University of Queensland.

  • Thomas, Emma, Haydon, Helen, Rawstorn, Jonathan and Gallagher, Robyn (2020). Helping more people access cardiac rehabilitation: an overview of telehealth. In: 30th Annual Scientific Meeting (ASM) of the Australian Cardiovascular Health and Rehabilitation Association (ACRA), Online, (). 10-12 August 2020.

  • Smith, A. C., Caffery, Liam and Haydon, Helen (2019). Fundamentals of telehealth - SFT19 workshop. Successes and Failures in Telehealth - 2019 (SFT19), Gold Coast, Australia, 20-22 October 2019.

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Using strict eligibility criteria, Voluntary Assisted Dying (VAD) laws are now passed in all Australian states. VAD permits an eligible person with a terminal illness to end their life through either self-administration or practitioner-administration of a VAD medication. VAD enables “people who are suffering and dying to choose the manner and timing of their death”. Although choice is a central tenet of VAD, people living in rural and remote locations lack choice if local health services are not providers.

    Telehealth effectively increases access to healthcare for such underserved populations. However, under federal legislation it may be a criminal offence for clinicians to discuss VAD via telehealth. Clinicians are uncertain about how to support people in rural and remote communities. Overseas, when appropriate, telehealth supports people to access VAD. This research investigates the impact of using (or not using) telehealth as a means of accessing VAD services on clinicians and consumers.