Dr Yin Xiang Setoh

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
Faculty of Science
y.setoh@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 51101

Overview

I obtained my PhD in Virology investigating the genetic determinants of West Nile virus virulence, under the supervision of Prof. Roy Hall at The University of Queensland in 2012. I furthered my research in the laboratory of Prof. Alexander Khromykh at The University of Queensland, investigating molecular determinants of virulence, and virus-host interactions relating to host innate immunity.

My research into viral replication and host innate immune interactions employs various molecular biology and protein biochemistry techniques. My current research includes molecular determinants of virulence, viral-host interactions, as well as in vivo host factor screening using artificial microRNA technology, predominantly for West Nile and Zika viruses. I also have an interest in the development of Ebola vaccines and therapeutics.

Projects are currently available, please email myself or Prof. Khromykh for enquiries.

Research Interests

  • Viral and host innate immune interactions
    This research employs various molecular biology and protein biochemistry techniques. My current research includes molecular determinants of virulence, viral-host interactions, as well as in vivo host factor screening using artificial microRNA technology, predominantly for West Nile and Zika viruses. Findings from these studies will directly implicate the host determinants, or viral-host interactions, that influence pathogenesis and can be translated into therapeutic measures.
  • Viral factors
    I have established a new method in the lab to study a wide array of viral factors (molecular determinants) ranging from virus infectivity, pathogenesis to neutralising antibody escape and host cell tropism. This is achieved using a high-throughput and massively parallel platform termed deep mutational scanning. This involves the use of a novel deep sequencing technique called barcoded sub-amplicon sequencing, and data is analysed using Python scripts installed on UQ-RCC's high performance computing cluster.
  • Insect specific flaviviruses as biological control
    I have developed a strategy to arm ISFs with a potent mechanism to destroy the genomic material of other human-pathogenic viruses (e.g. dengue, Zika, West Nile viruses) that are also spread by mosquitoes, therefore limiting the transmission of deadly viral diseases. This technology will be optimised and tested for the prevention of mosquito-borne viral outbreaks.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), The University of Queensland

Publications

  • Amarilla, Alberto Anastacio, Fumagalli, Marcilio Jorge, Figueiredo, Mario Luis, Lima-Junior, Djalma S., Santos-Junior, Nilton Nascimento, Alfonso, Helda Liz, Lippi, Veronica, Trabuco, Amanda Cristina, Lauretti, Flavio, Muller, Vanessa Danielle, Colón, David F., Luiz, João P. M., Suhrbier, Andreas, Setoh, Yin Xiang, Khromykh, Alexander A., Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu Moraes and Aquino, Victor Hugo (2018) Ilheus and Saint Louis encephalitis viruses elicit cross-protection against a lethal Rocio virus challenge in mice. PloS One, 13 6: e0199071. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0199071

  • Prow, Natalie A, Liu, Liang, Nakayama, Eri, Cooper, Tamara H, Yan, Kexin, Eldi, Preethi, Hazlewood, Jessamine E, Tang, Bing, Le, Thuy T, Setoh, Yin Xiang, Khromykh, Alexander A, Hobson-Peters, Jody, Diener, Kerrilyn R, Howley, Paul M, Hayball, John D and Suhrbier, Andreas (2018) A vaccinia-based single vector construct multi-pathogen vaccine protects against both Zika and chikungunya viruses. Nature Communications, 9 1: 1230. doi:10.1038/s41467-018-03662-6

  • Setoh, Yin Xiang, Periasamy, Parthiban, Peng, Nias Yong Gao, Amarilla, Alberto A, Slonchak, Andrii and Khromykh, Alexander A (2017) Helicase Domain of West Nile Virus NS3 Protein Plays a Role in Inhibition of Type I Interferon Signalling. Viruses, 9 11: 1-13. doi:10.3390/v9110326

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Using molecular virology approaches such as the generation of chimeric viruses between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of viruses, we identify viral proteins and/or their domains that contribute to enhanced virulence. In addition, in collaboration with the Bloom lab (https://research.fhcrc.org/bloom/) we have established a new approach called deep mutational scanning, which scans entire regions of the viral genome for amino acid residues preferred in a specific set of experimental conditions (i.e. antiviral factor, host-specificity, etc.).

    In the study of host-factors, we have established a novel method of in vivo RNAi screening, by coupling virus induced host-gene knockdown with the power of natural selection, to identify host genes important for controlling viral replication.

    Using classical virology methods, a new student would contribute by characterising the identified residues, viral proteins/domains, and/or host-viral protein interactions that have been identified by our screens.

  • Insect-specific flaviviruses (ISF), as the name implies, replicates and spreads within an insect host population (such as mosquitoes).

    I have developed a strategy to arm ISFs with a potent mechanism to destroy the genomic material of other human-pathogenic viruses (e.g. dengue, Zika, West Nile viruses) that are also spread by mosquitoes, therefore limiting the transmission of deadly viral diseases.

    A new student would contribute to this project by assessing the optimal genetical modifications to ISFs, and test the effectiveness of this strategy in preventing the spread of dengue and Zika viruses.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Using molecular virology approaches such as the generation of chimeric viruses between pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of viruses, we identify viral proteins and/or their domains that contribute to enhanced virulence. In addition, in collaboration with the Bloom lab (https://research.fhcrc.org/bloom/) we have established a new approach called deep mutational scanning, which scans entire regions of the viral genome for amino acid residues preferred in a specific set of experimental conditions (i.e. antiviral factor, host-specificity, etc.).

    In the study of host-factors, we have established a novel method of in vivo RNAi screening, by coupling virus induced host-gene knockdown with the power of natural selection, to identify host genes important for controlling viral replication.

    Using classical virology methods, a new student would contribute by characterising the identified residues, viral proteins/domains, and/or host-viral protein interactions that have been identified by our screens.

  • Insect-specific flaviviruses (ISF), as the name implies, replicates and spreads within an insect host population (such as mosquitoes).

    I have developed a strategy to arm ISFs with a potent mechanism to destroy the genomic material of other human-pathogenic viruses (e.g. dengue, Zika, West Nile viruses) that are also spread by mosquitoes, therefore limiting the transmission of deadly viral diseases.

    A new student would contribute to this project by assessing the optimal genetical modifications to ISFs, and test the effectiveness of this strategy in preventing the spread of dengue and Zika viruses.