Dr Karan Gulati

NHMRC Senior Research Officer

School of Dentistry
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
k.gulati@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 58031

Overview

Dr. Gulati is working as a Research Fellow at School of Dentistry, The University of Queensland, QLD, Australia. His main research focus is ‘nano-engineered therapeutic titanium dental implants towards enhanced soft- and hard-tissue integration’. More recently Dr. Gulati was successful in obtaining Australian Government’s National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Early Career Fellowship (Jan 2018- Dec 2021).

Prior to current appointment, Dr. Gulati worked at the School of Dentistry and Oral Health, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Australia as a Research Fellow (2016-17), working in the area of nano-engineered dental implants. He completed PhD in the domain of 'Nano-Engineered Bone Implants' from School of Chemical Engineering, The University of Adelaide, Australia in 2015, and was awarded Dean’s Commendation for Doctoral Thesis Excellence. Besides he also completed a 1.5 year Research Internship at Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Adelaide, South Australia (2010-2011).

Research Impacts

The trans-mucosal nature of dental implants presents a unique challenge from a biomaterial perspective, requiring not only rapid establishment and maintenance of osseointegration in alveolar bone of varying quantity and quality, but also the formation of resilient soft tissue integration. Two key challenges in achieving long-term dental implant success include: 1) sub-optimal bone integration in compromised bone conditions; and 2) impaired trans-mucosal tissue integration in the presence of a persistent oral microbial biofilm. In order to manage the complex therapeutic requirements of the dental micro-environment, the therapeutic properties of titanium dental implant surfaces have been enhanced via mechanical, chemical and biological modifications. Among these, titania nanotubes (TNTs) engineered on Ti surfaces of various geometries/alloys using electrochemical anodization process, present considerable therapeutic potential due to a number of favourable properties including appropriate biomechanics, enhanced osseointegration, tailorable drug loading/release and mechano-transduction.

Dr. Gulati’s research focuses on the developments and challenges associated with nanotube-modified titanium surfaces for applicability in dental implant therapy, with focus on generating tailorable devices that can address the unique challenges associated with dental implants.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philoshopy, The University of Adelaide

Publications

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Publications

Book Chapter

  • Gulati, Karan, Kogawa, Masakazu, Maher, Shaheer, Atkins, Gerald, Findlay, David and Losic, Dusan (2015). Titania nanotubes for local drug delivery from implant surfaces. In Dusan Losic and Abel Santos (Ed.), Electrochemically engineered nanoporous materials: methods, properties and applications (pp. 307-355) Berlin, Germany: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-20346-1_10

Journal Article

Conference Publication