Professor Kim Halford

Professor

School of Psychology
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
k.halford@psy.uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 56375

Overview

W. Kim Halford, PhD FAPsS is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, and a registered clinical psychologist. He earned his doctoral degree from Latrobe University in Melbourne, Australia in 1979. Previously he was Professor of Clinical Psychology at Griffith University (1995 – 2008), and before that Chief Psychologist of the Royal Brisbane Hospital (1991-1994). Kim has published 6 books and over 180 articles, primarily focused on couple therapy and couple relationship education.

Research Interests

  • couples and family
    prediction of couple and family adjustment, couple relationship education, couple therapy, coping with major life changes (e.g. parenthood, major illness, work family, and retirement)

Research Impacts

Kim Halford and his team developed the widely used Couple CARE relationship education programs. He works with clinically distressed couples; couples adjusting to major life challenges, including developing committed relationships; couples struggling with severe physical and mental health problems in a partner; couples becoming parents, couples forming stepfamilies, couples transitioning to retirement, parents negotiating co-parenting after separation, and diversity in couple relationships across age, culture and sexual orientation. He has presented workshops on couple therapy and education to more than 10,000 professionals across more than 15 countries. Hw works closely with community agencies who offer couple couseling, education and family mediation to enhance the offering of effectve, evidence-based servcies.

Qualifications

  • Australian Psychological Society
  • Doctor of Philosphy, La Trobe University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • About 30% of Australian marriages are between partners drawn from different cultures. If intercultural relationships cna draw on the strengths of multiple cultures, that can enhance relationship adjutsment. Howver, interculutural partners often struggle to adapt to the relationship beliefs and styles of communication that their spouse brings to the relationship.The current research aims to develop and evaluate relationship education and therapy that assists partners to develop mutually satisfying relationships.

  • The population sof gay and lesbian young adults have exceptionally high rates of psycholgical problems and suicide, which reflect living in a homophobic environment.,. Being in a stable, rewarding relationship provides an important resource to sustaining mental health. The research aims to develop and evaluate relationship education and therapy for gay and lesbian couples.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Bakhurst, Melissa G. and Halford, William K. (2016). Dyadic coping in Australian couples. In Mariana Falconier, Ashley K. Randall and Guy Bodenmann (Ed.), Couples coping with stress: a cross-cultural perspective (pp. 269-284) New York, NY United States: Routledge.

  • Pepping, Christopher A. and Halford, W. Kim (2016). Mindfulness and couple relationships. In Edo Shonin, William Van Gordon and Mark D. Griffiths (Ed.), Mindfulness and Buddhist-derived approaches in mental health and addiction (pp. 391-411) Cham: Springer International Publishing. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-22255-4_19

  • Halford, Kim, Petch, Jemima and Bate, Karina (2014). Empirically based couple relationship education. In Erika Lawrence and Kieran Sullivan (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Couple Dysfunction () New York, NY United States: Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199783267.013.005

  • Hiew, Danika N., Halford, W. Kim and Liu, Shuang (2014). Loving diversity: living in intercultural couple relationships. In Angela Abela and Janet Walker (Ed.), Contemporary issues in family studies: global perspectives on partnerships, parenting and support in a changing world (pp. 87-99) New York, NY, United States: John Wiley & Sons. doi:10.1002/9781118320990

  • Halford, W. Kim and van Acker, Elizabeth (2012). Are governments and marriage strange bedfellows? Social policy and couple relationship education. In Patricia Noller and Gery C. Karantzas (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of couples and family relationships (pp. 453-465) Chichester, United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell. doi:10.1002/9781444354119.ch31

  • Pachana, Nancy A., Baillie, Andrew, Helmes, Edward, Halford, W. Kim, Murray, Greg, Kyrios, Mike, O’Donovan, Analise, O’Brien, Mia, Schwartz, Steven and Sofronoff, Kate (2012). Taking clinical psychology postgraduate training into the next decade: aligning competencies to the curriculum. In Sherri McCarthy, K. Laurie Dickson, Jacquelyn Cranney, Annie Trapp and Victor Karandashev (Ed.), Teaching psychology around the world (pp. 72-86) Newcastle upon Tyne, United Kingdom: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

  • Halford, W. Kim and Hayes, Samira (2012). Taking it to the streets (and information super highways): Using technology to enhance the reach and impact of marriage and relationship education. In Patricia Noller and Gery C. Karantzas (Ed.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of couples and family relationships (pp. 273-288) New York: Wiley-Blackwell. doi:10.1002/9781444354119.ch19

  • Larson, Jeffry and Halford, W. Kim (2011). One size does not fit all: Customizing couple relationship education for unique couple needs. In Joseph L. Wetchler (Ed.), Handbook of clinical issues in couple therapy 2nd ed. (pp. 293-309) New York, NY, United States: Routledge.

  • Casey, Leanne M. and Halford, W. Kim (2010). Couples and the silicon chip: Applying information technology to couple relationship services. In Donald H. Baucom, Kurt Hahlweg and Mariann Grawe-Gerber (Ed.), Enhancing couples: The shape of couple therapy to come (pp. 216-230) Cambridge, MA, United States: Hogrefe.

  • Halford, W. Kim, Chambers, Suzanne and Clutton, Samantha (2010). Couples coping with cancer. In Nancy A. Pachana, Ken Laidlaw and Bob G. Knight (Ed.), Casebook of Clinical Geropsychology: International Perspectives on Practice (pp. 73-90) New York, United States: Oxford University Press.

  • Halford, W. Kim and Casey, Leanne M. (2010). Taking it to the people: Using technology to enhance the impact of couple relationship education. In Donald H. Baucom, Kurt Hahlweg and Mariann Grawe-Gerber (Ed.), Enhancing couples: The shape of couple therapy to come (pp. 111-127) Cambridge, MA, U.S.A.: Hogrefe.

  • Nicholson, Jan. M, Sanders, Matthew. R, Halford, Kim, Phillips, Maddy and Whitton, Sarah. W (2008). The prevention and treatment of children's adjustment problems in stepfamilies. In Pryor, Jan (Ed.), The international handbook of stepfamilies: Policy and practice in legal, research, and clinical environments (pp. 485-521) Hoboken, NJ, United States: John Wiley & Sons. doi:10.1002/9781118269923.ch20

  • Halford, W. Kim, Wilson, K. L. and Moore, E. (2007). Promoting a love for life: Couple relationship education to enhance ralationship outcomes. In Shaw, Elisabeth and Crawley, Jim (Ed.), Couple therapy in Australia : Issues emerging from practice (pp. 1-432) Kew, Vic., Australia: PsychOz Publications.

  • Halford, W. Kim and Bouma, Ruth (1998). Complex relationship cases: Conceptualisation, assessment and treatment. In Tarrier, Nicholas, Wells, Adrian and Haddock, Gillian (Ed.), Treating complex cases: The cognitive behavioural therapy approach (pp. 399-429) Chichester, England; New York, U.S.: J. Wiley.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • About 30% of Australian marriages are between partners drawn from different cultures. If intercultural relationships cna draw on the strengths of multiple cultures, that can enhance relationship adjutsment. Howver, interculutural partners often struggle to adapt to the relationship beliefs and styles of communication that their spouse brings to the relationship.The current research aims to develop and evaluate relationship education and therapy that assists partners to develop mutually satisfying relationships.

  • The population sof gay and lesbian young adults have exceptionally high rates of psycholgical problems and suicide, which reflect living in a homophobic environment.,. Being in a stable, rewarding relationship provides an important resource to sustaining mental health. The research aims to develop and evaluate relationship education and therapy for gay and lesbian couples.