Dr Swaid Abdullah

Lecturer in Veterinary Parasitology

School of Veterinary Science
Faculty of Science
swaid.abdullah@uq.edu.au
+61 7 54601 965

Overview

I am Veterinary Parasitologist, having varied interests in the field of parasitology; from ticks, fleas, tick- and flea-borne pathogens to modelling the global seasonality of parasite prevalence. I am interested in understanding the ecology and epidemiology of parasites and development of feasible control strategies based on this knowledge. I have a special interest in understanding the transmission pathways of zoonotic parasites and their spillover from animals to humans and vice versa, this being a need of the hour because of the extension of human activities into the wild. I also work for educating general public about the risks of parasitic diseases and possible control measures.

My current resaerch project will be evaluating the occurrence of intestinal parasites infestation of pet dogs targeting the urban, suburban and semi-rural areas of Queensland over a period of one year and estimate the efficacy of the currently used anti-parasitic drugs and feed the results back to the veterinary practices and pet owners for improved knowledge and public awareness.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Veterinary Science, G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Master of Veterinary Science, G. B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Bristol

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • The proposed study will work around veterinary practices and public parks in the urban and suburban areas of Queensland. The concerned small animal clinician and nurses of each practice will be asked to fill a questionnaire, asking questions about the parasites and parasitic infestations, which they consider are prevalent in their area and about the zoonotic potential of these parasites. The faecal samples collected from dogs during the survey will be brought to School of Veterinary Sciences, Gatton for analysis. Results after analysis and interpretation will be channelled back in a simplified format (pamphlets/brochures) to the veterinary practices and pet owners to improve the knowledge of practices about the prevalence of various dog parasites in their area and to educate dog owners about importance of regular treatment of their dogs and cleaning up their surrounding of dog faeces for better control of parasites and potential zoonoses.

    This study will provide a deeper insight of the extent of parasitic infestation in dogs and potential zoonoses in Queensland. It will also aid in checking the efficacy of the antiparasitic drugs and a possible drug resistance in parasites.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Grants (Administered at UQ)

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • The proposed study will work around veterinary practices and public parks in the urban and suburban areas of Queensland. The concerned small animal clinician and nurses of each practice will be asked to fill a questionnaire, asking questions about the parasites and parasitic infestations, which they consider are prevalent in their area and about the zoonotic potential of these parasites. The faecal samples collected from dogs during the survey will be brought to School of Veterinary Sciences, Gatton for analysis. Results after analysis and interpretation will be channelled back in a simplified format (pamphlets/brochures) to the veterinary practices and pet owners to improve the knowledge of practices about the prevalence of various dog parasites in their area and to educate dog owners about importance of regular treatment of their dogs and cleaning up their surrounding of dog faeces for better control of parasites and potential zoonoses.

    This study will provide a deeper insight of the extent of parasitic infestation in dogs and potential zoonoses in Queensland. It will also aid in checking the efficacy of the antiparasitic drugs and a possible drug resistance in parasites.