Dr Edward Narayan

Senior Lecturer

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Faculty of Science

Affiliate Senior Research Fellow

Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
e.narayan@uq.edu.au
+61 7 54601 693
0401697287

Overview

Dr Edward Narayan is Senior Lecturer of Animal Science in the School of Agriculture and Food Sciences. Edward graduated with a PhD degree in Biology from the University of the South Pacific and pioneered non-invasive reproductive and stress endocrinology tools for amphibians - the novel development and validation of non-invasive enzyme immunoassays for the evaluation of reproductive hormonal cycle and stress hormone responses to environmental stressors. Dr. Narayan was also a recipient of the Gold Medal Award for undergraduate Bachelor of Science degree from the USP.

Dr. Narayan has extensive postdoctoral research fellowship training in institutions spanning 4 countries (New Zealand-Landcare Research), Australia (Griffith University), India (Australian Academy of Science Early Career Fellowship – University of Pune) and Canada (Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Saskatchewan).

Edward joined Griffith University, Queensland with a successful Vice-Chancellor's postdoctoral fellowship. Edward initiated an innovative long-term research program based on the Conservation Physiology of wildlife. Edward's dynamic career research platform is based on the thematic areas of comparative vertebrate physiology, stress endocrinology, reproductive endocrinology, animal health and welfare, and conservation biology. Edward's research team comprising of supervised Honours, Masters and Ph.D. students (and numerous student volunteers) have made significant new discoveries, including understanding the sub-clinical physiological impacts of the debilitating pathogenic disease (chytridiomycosis) on amphibians; the physiological impacts and fitness consequences of acute and chronic environmental stressors on amphibians. Edward has also developed non-invasive stress hormone monitoring tools for marsupials such as the Koala, Woylie and the endangered Greater Bilby. Edward has also studied the stress physiology, health, and welfare of Tigers in Australian and Indian Zoos.

Edward has supervised over 50 undergraduate special topics, Honours, Masters and PhD students in Australia and from overseas. Edward has published over 90 peer-reviewed research in collaboration with researchers in Australia such as Murdoch University, Sydney University, University of Melbourne, Macquarie University, Deakin University and Griffith University, and internationally (USA, India, Canada and New Zealand). Edward also has active on-going research collaborations internationally (e.g. India, Argentina, Vietnam, Canada, Brazil, and the USA).

Edward's current research program focuses on building resilience in production animals through a combination of physiological, behavioral and management practice approaches to boost animal health, welfare, and productivity. He leads the Stress Lab and is also an affiliate Senior Research Fellow of the Queensland Alliance of Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI).

Edward's research program in livestock strongly connects with livestock farmers groups across regional Australia and currently focusses on Merino sheep reproduction and technology improvements through a research project funded by the Australian Wool Innovation. Edward also provides consultation support based on Animal Welfare related work. He currently holds membership in the Endocrine Society of Australia, International Association of Stress Physiologists, Society for Experimental Biology, Australia & New Zealand Society for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry and International Society for Wildlife Endocrinology.

Previously, Edward has been an academic faculty member at Charles Sturt University (School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences) and Western Sydney University (School of Science).

Research Pages:

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Edward_Narayan

https://sites.google.com/site/edwardnarayanphysiologylab/

Research Interests

  • Animal Stress, Welfare and Productivity
    I am interested in the role of physiological tools for the quantification of physiological stress to boost welfare and sustainable production
  • Animal Welfare and Stress Physiology
    The STRESS LAB conducts fundamental, applied research projects to evaluate the eco-physiological resilience of animals (domesticated and wildlife species) to environmental and management factors.

Research Impacts

Agriculture Sector - Dr. Narayan has a cross-sector network in primary industries through numerous national/international collaborations. For example, the Institute of Tropical Agriculture and Food Security, University Putra Malaysia (see publication) and SARDI (South Australian Research Development and Innovation). Dr. Narayan has also attracted scholarship for undergraduate students through the Australian Wool Education Trust (AWET). Funding through various industry partners including Meat and Livestock Australia (MLA), Australian Wool Innovation (AWI), etc.

Environmental Sector - Dr. Narayan has delivered public seminars at leading National Koala Rescue and Rehabilitation Clinics including Port Stephens Koalas, Friends of the Koala Ballina, and Port Macquarie Koala Hospital. Dr. Narayan has an active network with the Adelaide Koala and Wildlife Hospital. Current international networks with wildlife conservation and rehabilitation groups including Animals Asia, Australian Koala Founction, Wildlife Institute of India and International Funds for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

Zoo Programs: Dr. Narayan is current individual member of the Zoos and Aquarium Association (ZAA) - Animal Welfare accreditation body for captive zoo facilities in Australasia. Through this role, Dr. Narayan has provided research opportunities for numerous WSU project students and led consultancies to improve the husbandry and breeding program of captive Zoo animals (e.g. Australian marsupials, Big Cats and Saltwater crocodiles).

Science Education in Developing Pacific Island Countries: Dr. Narayan actively networks with Pacific Island Countries especially through membership on the Pacific Invasives Partnership Initiative (PIP). Dr. Narayan has actively shared research through seminars in all major Universities in the Fiji Islands (the University of the South Pacific and Fiji National University).

Media Engagement: Dr. Narayan has actively participated in media interviews such as BBC Wildlife Magazine based on "Happiness in Wildlife", The Conversation and B-Lab Coats. Dr. Narayan has also spoken to ABC Rural interviews on the topics of Animal Welfare of Livestock and Australian Mammals and particularly his research on Heat Stress Management in Sheep and Koala appeared on Australian Academy of Science extension videos and also in numerous local and international newspapers.

Qualifications

  • Grad Cert in Learning and Teaching in Higher Ed, Aust.
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of South Pacific

Publications

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Grants

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Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

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Available Projects

  • The focus of the STRESS LAB is to undertake innovative research projects that apply a combination of physiological behavioral, computational approaches to study the well-being of animals under human care. Our research models include domesticated animals such as sheep and cattle as well as wildlife animals such as frogs, birds, small mammals. Research work can be done in Australia or using one of our collaborated national and international field locations (e.g. HiddenVale Wildlife Facility). Students with a strong GPA are welcome to contact Edward to discuss further project opportunities.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • The focus of the STRESS LAB is to undertake innovative research projects that apply a combination of physiological behavioral, computational approaches to study the well-being of animals under human care. Our research models include domesticated animals such as sheep and cattle as well as wildlife animals such as frogs, birds, small mammals. Research work can be done in Australia or using one of our collaborated national and international field locations (e.g. HiddenVale Wildlife Facility). Students with a strong GPA are welcome to contact Edward to discuss further project opportunities.