Dr Seema Mihrshahi

Honorary Fellow

School of Public Health
Faculty of Medicine

Overview

Seema is a nutritional epidemiologist and her research interests are focused on the health and nutrition of women and children in developing countries.

She has participated in various research projects in India, Vietnam, Thailand and Bangladesh. She is currently one of the Chief Investigators of the NH&MRC funded Mirpur Shishu Pushti Project in Bangladesh. The project is testing an extended peer counselling intervention to improve the prevalence of breastfeeding and appropriate complementary feeding practices and reduce rates of malnutrition in infants and children in urban Dhaka.

Seema is a founding member of the South Asia Infant Feeding Research Network (SAIFRN) funded by AusAID. SAIFRN seeks to improve infant and young child feeding practices and reduce infant mortality in the South Asian region. As part of the network she attends biannual research and dissemination meetings which are focused on developing new research questions and increasing the research capacity of South Asian investigators with an interest in infant and young child feeding. The outcomes include creating policy relevant information about the current situation and assessing trends and key factors associated with infant and young child feeding practices in the region.

Seema’s previous roles were as Postdoctoral Research Fellow at Monash University, The University of Melbourne and previous to that at the University of Sydney and The George Institute for International Health Research.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy - International Health, Curtin University

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Stunting (low height-for-age) is a key marker chronic malnutrition and is one of the key processes in early life that lead to poor growth and other adverse outcomes such as diminished survival, poor childhood and adult health, poor learning capacity, and low productivity. This project will focus on the most recent DHS datasets and identify the predictors of stunting in the region of South Asia

  • Low maternal education is an important predictor of health risk factors for women and children, particularly in developing countries. Mothers with low education are less likely to deliver in a health facility, seek antenatal or neonatal care and more likely to be at risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. They are also less likely to seek health care for their child. In this review we will examine a number of studies in developing countries where health and education of mothers have been linked and define the associations.

  • Lack of exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age and no breastfeeding among children 6-23 months of age is associated with increased diarrhoea morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This systematic review will collate the evidence for the protective effect of optimal infant feeding in the first year and its effects on morbidity and mortality particularly from diarrhoea and respiratory illness.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

Dr Seema Mihrshahi is not currently available to take on new students.

  • Stunting (low height-for-age) is a key marker chronic malnutrition and is one of the key processes in early life that lead to poor growth and other adverse outcomes such as diminished survival, poor childhood and adult health, poor learning capacity, and low productivity. This project will focus on the most recent DHS datasets and identify the predictors of stunting in the region of South Asia

  • Low maternal education is an important predictor of health risk factors for women and children, particularly in developing countries. Mothers with low education are less likely to deliver in a health facility, seek antenatal or neonatal care and more likely to be at risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes. They are also less likely to seek health care for their child. In this review we will examine a number of studies in developing countries where health and education of mothers have been linked and define the associations.

  • Lack of exclusive breastfeeding among infants 0-5 months of age and no breastfeeding among children 6-23 months of age is associated with increased diarrhoea morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This systematic review will collate the evidence for the protective effect of optimal infant feeding in the first year and its effects on morbidity and mortality particularly from diarrhoea and respiratory illness.