Dr Zoltan Neufeld

ARC Future Fellowship

Mathematics
Faculty of Science

Affiliate ARC Future Fellow

Institute for Molecular Bioscience
z.neufeld@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 51349

Overview

Research Interests

  • Applied and Computational Mathematics
    Mathematical Biology, Collective behaviour of cells, Tissue modelling, Biomechanics

Qualifications

  • Doctor in Physics, Eötvös Loránd University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • This project will investigate the role of mechanical interactions between cells in determining the structure, morphology of different types of biological tissues. The project will use mathematical models, based on partial differential equations and/or stochastic models of interacting particles, and computer simulations and involves collaboration with experimental biology groups.

  • This research project will develop a biologically realistic mathematical model and computer simulations of the growth of glioblastoma brain tumours, that then can be used for testing and optimising treatment strategies, including surgery, radio- and chemo-therapy. The project will develop and investigate partial different equation models that describe the distribution and spreading of cancer cells in the tissue. The modelling work will be supported by experiments and MRI imaging data from the Centre of Advanced Imaging at UQ.

  • The aim of this project is to understand the hierarchy and relative contributions of different stem cell populations to epidermal homeostasis and to develop a comprehensive computational model that accurately describes the spatial/temporal organization of tissue self-renewal. The project will analyze experimental data obtained from advanced imaging and genetic technology at the UQ Clinical Research Centre. The project will also study the effects of UV radiation induced carcinogenesis on epidermal regeneration by developing a predictive model for the growth dynamics of mutant clones.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Hernandez-Garcia, E., Lopez, C. and Neufeld, Z. (2003). Spatial patterns in chemically and biologically reacting flows. In G. Boffetta, G. Lacorata, G. Visconti and A. Vulpiani (Ed.), Chaos in geophysical flows (pp. 35-62) Rome, Italy: OTTO Editore.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • This project will investigate the role of mechanical interactions between cells in determining the structure, morphology of different types of biological tissues. The project will use mathematical models, based on partial differential equations and/or stochastic models of interacting particles, and computer simulations and involves collaboration with experimental biology groups.

  • This research project will develop a biologically realistic mathematical model and computer simulations of the growth of glioblastoma brain tumours, that then can be used for testing and optimising treatment strategies, including surgery, radio- and chemo-therapy. The project will develop and investigate partial different equation models that describe the distribution and spreading of cancer cells in the tissue. The modelling work will be supported by experiments and MRI imaging data from the Centre of Advanced Imaging at UQ.

  • The aim of this project is to understand the hierarchy and relative contributions of different stem cell populations to epidermal homeostasis and to develop a comprehensive computational model that accurately describes the spatial/temporal organization of tissue self-renewal. The project will analyze experimental data obtained from advanced imaging and genetic technology at the UQ Clinical Research Centre. The project will also study the effects of UV radiation induced carcinogenesis on epidermal regeneration by developing a predictive model for the growth dynamics of mutant clones.