Dr Iris Wang

ARC DECRA Research Fellow

Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research
Queensland Brain Institute
t.wang4@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 66362

Overview

Research Interests

  • The role of activity-dependent NMDAR exocytosis in neural plasticity
    LTP is the most studied form of synaptic plasticity, which underlies the learning and memory formation. During LTP, brief periods of high frequency stimulation produce highly correlated neuronal activity between pre- and post-synaptic neurons that is detected by NMDARs, activating Calcium-dependent signalling pathways that result in profound reorganisation of the molecular composition of excitatory synapses. This causes subsequent enlargement of dendritic spines and an increase in the number of AMPARs on the postsynaptic membrane, leading to a persistent increase in synaptic efficacy. However, given the importance of NMDAR in LTP initiation, little is known about the activity-induced dynamic changes that occur in the surface expression of these receptors. We aim to use discipline assays that combining biochemical assays, high-temporal resolution live imaging and super-resolution microscopy to resolve the dynamic behaviour of NMDAR trafficking during neural plasticity process. We also aim to reveal how NMDAR-mediated transmission is controlled by endosomal and membrane trafficking mechanisms that are under tight regulation of the synaptic activity. This work will help us to better understand how our brain operates during information processing and storage at the molecular level.
  • Vesicle trafficking mechanisms underlying axon regeneration.
    Deficiencies in long-range axonal trafficking is known to be early sign and causal reason for many forms of neurodegeneration caused by diseases as well as acute trauma. My current research also includes identify critical cellular and molecular mechanisms of long-range axonal trafficking, which is the key to promote axon regeneration after acute neural injury. Advanced microscopy techniques of structural illuminated microscopy (SIM) and total internal reflectory microscopy (TIRFM) are used to capture and quantify the vesicle trafficking along the axons of live-neurons. The ultimate goal of my research is to find ways to rescue and revert the impaired intracellular vesicle trafficking that leads to the severe damages in many forms of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Neurobiology, Chinese Acad.Sc.

Publications

  • Harper, Callista B., Wang, Tong, Joensuu, Merja, Papadopulos, Andreas and Meunier, Frederic A. (2017). Nanoscale imaging of botulinum neurotoxin type a retrograde axonal trafficking. In: Rose Puleo, TOXINS: Basic Science and Clinical Aspects of Botulinum and other Neurotoxins, Madrid, Spain, (S37-S38). 18-21 January 2017. doi:10.1016/j.toxicon.2016.11.106

  • Wang, Tong, Martin, Sally, Nguyen, Tam H., Harper, Callista B., Gormal, Rachel S., Martinez-Marmol, Ramon, Karunanithi, Shanker, Coulson, Elizabeth J., Glass, Nick R., Cooper-White, Justin J., Van Swinderen, Bruno and Meunier, Frederic A. (2016) Flux of signalling endosomes undergoing axonal retrograde transport is encoded by presynaptic activity and TrkB. Nature Communications, 7 . doi:10.1038/ncomms12976

  • Harper, Callista B., Papadopulos, Andreas, Martin, Sally, Matthews, Daniel R., Morgan, Garry P., Nguyen, Tam H., Wang, Tong, Nair, Deepak, Choquet, Daniel and Meunier, Frederic A. (2016) Botulinum neurotoxin type-A enters a non-recycling pool of synaptic vesicles. Scientific Reports, 6 19654.1-19654.13. doi:10.1038/srep19654

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Deficiencies in long-range axonal trafficking is known to be early sign and causal reason for many forms of neurodegeneration caused by diseases as well as acute trauma. My current research also includes identify critical cellular and molecular mechanisms of long-range axonal trafficking, which is the key to promote axon regeneration after acute neural injury. Advanced microscopy techniques of structural illuminated microscopy (SIM) and total internal reflectory microscopy (TIRFM) are used to capture and quantify the vesicle trafficking along the axons of live-neurons. The ultimate goal of my research is to find ways to rescue and revert the impaired intracellular vesicle trafficking that leads to the severe damages in many forms of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

  • Harper, Callista B., Wang, Tong, Joensuu, Merja, Papadopulos, Andreas and Meunier, Frederic A. (2017). Nanoscale imaging of botulinum neurotoxin type a retrograde axonal trafficking. In: Rose Puleo, TOXINS: Basic Science and Clinical Aspects of Botulinum and other Neurotoxins, Madrid, Spain, (S37-S38). 18-21 January 2017. doi:10.1016/j.toxicon.2016.11.106

  • Wang, T., Martin, S., Papadopulos, A., Harper, C., Mavlyutov, T., Niranjan, D., Glass, N., Cooper-White, J., Sibarita, J. -B., Choquet, D., Davletov, B. and Meunier, F. (2015). Control of autophagosome axonal retrograde flux by presynaptic activity unveiled using botulinum neurotoxin type-A. In: 25th Biennial Meeting of the International-Society-for-Neurochemistry Jointly with the 13th Meeting of the Asian-Pacific-Society-for-Neurochemistry in Conjunction with the 35th Meeting of the Australasian-Neuroscience-Society, Cairns Australia, (165-165). Aug 23-27, 2015.

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Deficiencies in long-range axonal trafficking is known to be early sign and causal reason for many forms of neurodegeneration caused by diseases as well as acute trauma. My current research also includes identify critical cellular and molecular mechanisms of long-range axonal trafficking, which is the key to promote axon regeneration after acute neural injury. Advanced microscopy techniques of structural illuminated microscopy (SIM) and total internal reflectory microscopy (TIRFM) are used to capture and quantify the vesicle trafficking along the axons of live-neurons. The ultimate goal of my research is to find ways to rescue and revert the impaired intracellular vesicle trafficking that leads to the severe damages in many forms of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma.