Dr Hang Ta

Research Fellow

Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Overview

Dr. Hang Ta holds joint appointments at Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology and School of Pharmacy, the University of Queensland.

Expertise: Dr Hang Ta’s research addresses solutions for current problems in diagnosis and treatment of diseases. She is a pioneering bio-nanomaterials researcher developing innovative nanomaterials and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nanosensors for molecular imaging and drug delivery for cardiovascular disease in Australia. Dr Hang Ta’s team has great expertise in the full suite of forefront materials characterization techniques, and is skilled in the design of molecular imaging and drug delivery systems based on metal oxide and biocompatible polymers.

Awards and Funding: Dr Hang Ta has been awarded a number of prizes, grants and prestigious fellowships such as National Heart Foundation postdoctoral fellowship, NHMRC ECR fellowship and National Heart Foundation Future Leader Fellowship. She has secured over $2.5 million in competitive grant funding from national funding agencies for both discovery and infrastructure projects.

Research Outputs and Impacts: Dr Ta has published papers in journals with high impact factor such as Nature Protocols (Jif: 11.74), Circulation Research (Jif: 11.861), Biomaterials (Jif: 8.496) and Journal of Controlled Release (Jif: 8.078). Her research on iron oxide nanoparticles for molecular imaging of thrombosis was highlighted on cover page of Circulation Research, a second-ranked journal in the field of cardiovascular research.

Teaching: Dr Hang Ta is a lecturer for CHEE4305 (Biomaterials: Materials in Medicine), the University of Queensland and also a guest lecturer for AMME5931 (Nanomaterials in Medicine) at the University of Sydney. She has been a principal supervisor of more than 15 undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Links: Dr Hang Ta has links both across Australia and internationally, including Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Monash University, University of Melbourne, University of Wollongong, Curtin University, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Prince Charles Hospital, and Soochow University (China).

Research Interests

  • Nanosensors for detecting and grading diseases
  • Molecular imaging/Diagnosis of cardiovascular disease
  • Novel nanomaterials for theranostics of cardiovascular, inflammatory, and cancerous diseases
  • Novel reversible blood clotting agents
  • Cardioascular diseases on the chip

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Melbourne

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Every newly developed drug need to be tested through several rounds of animal testing before they can be tested on human. However, a rodent or chimp’s response to a medication does not alsway translate so smoothly in a person. This project aims to develop chips that mimics the biological processes of cardiovascular diseases, which allows testing new therapies freely on “subjects” without harming any living creatures and lessen the need for animal testing.

  • The early detection and accurate characterization of life-threatening diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer are critical to the design of treatment. Knowing whether a thrombus in a blood vessel is new/fresh or old/constituted, and whether a tumour mass has hypoxia region is very important for physicians to decide a treatment protocol. This project will develop smart magnetic resonance imaging nano-sensors that can detect, sense and report the stage or progression of cardiovascular diseases such as thrombosis, the leading cause of death in Australia and worldwide.

  • Inflammation is part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. Chronic inflammation might lead to a host of diseases, such as hay fever, periodontitis, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and even cancer. For example, in atherosclerosis, inflammation plays a key role in all stages from initiation of plaque development to transition of a plaque from stable to a rupture-prone state. This project will investigate novel approaches to develop nanomaterials which combine both therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities for inflammatory diseases in one dose.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

  • Nguyen, Luong Duc, Cao, Cuong, Ta, Hang Thu, Le, Tien Thuy and Phan, Huyen Thi Enzyme Technology. Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam: Vietnam National University Publisher, 2004.

Book Chapter

  • Ta, Hang T., Dunstan, Dave E. and Dass, Crispin R. (2010). Anticancer activity and therapeutic applications of chitosan nanoparticles. In Se-Kwon Kim (Ed.), Chitin, Chitosan, Oligosaccharides and Their Derivatives: Biological Activities and Applications (pp. 271-284) Boca Raton, FL, United States: CRC Press. doi:10.1201/EBK1439816035-c21

Journal Article

Conference Publication

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Every newly developed drug need to be tested through several rounds of animal testing before they can be tested on human. However, a rodent or chimp’s response to a medication does not alsway translate so smoothly in a person. This project aims to develop chips that mimics the biological processes of cardiovascular diseases, which allows testing new therapies freely on “subjects” without harming any living creatures and lessen the need for animal testing.

  • The early detection and accurate characterization of life-threatening diseases such as cardiovascular disease and cancer are critical to the design of treatment. Knowing whether a thrombus in a blood vessel is new/fresh or old/constituted, and whether a tumour mass has hypoxia region is very important for physicians to decide a treatment protocol. This project will develop smart magnetic resonance imaging nano-sensors that can detect, sense and report the stage or progression of cardiovascular diseases such as thrombosis, the leading cause of death in Australia and worldwide.

  • Inflammation is part of the complex biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. Chronic inflammation might lead to a host of diseases, such as hay fever, periodontitis, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and even cancer. For example, in atherosclerosis, inflammation plays a key role in all stages from initiation of plaque development to transition of a plaque from stable to a rupture-prone state. This project will investigate novel approaches to develop nanomaterials which combine both therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities for inflammatory diseases in one dose.

  • Currently, there is a lack of effective therapeutics for internal bleeding following a traumatic event. In this project, novel reversible blood clotting nanomaterials will be designed to be able to hunt for internal injuries and bleeding and then stop the bleeding quickly.