Professor Sue Tett

Emeritus Professor

School of Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
s.tett@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 61900

Overview

Professor Susan Tett is a registered pharmacist with research interests in Quality Use of Medicines (improving how medicines are used) and clinical pharmacokinetics (optimising medicine doses)

Sue completed her PhD in 1988. Since this time she has been in research positions and in academia at Sydney University, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney and at the University of Queensland. She has over 150 peer reviewed research publications and over 200 conference presentations and is on Editorial Board of Clinical Pharmacokinetics. Sue was Head of the School of Pharmacy, University of Queensland 1996-2004 and Deputy Executive Dean & Associate Dean Research for the Faculty of Health Sciences 2006-2010, including periods as Acting Executive Dean.

Susan Tett has been a member of many Australian national and State advisory committees, including Pharmaceutical Health and Rational use of Medicines Committee 1996-2004, Pharmaceutical Sub-Committee of the Australian Drug Evaluation Committee 1995-2004, Pharmaceutical Industry Working Group 2003-10 , Pharmaceutical Partnerships Program Committee of the Industry Research & Development Board 2003-09, and has participated in NHMRC Project Grant Review Panels and Fellowships Panels. She was also Councillor for the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia (Queensland Branch) and was the Australian Pharmacist of the Year in 1999, for her contributions to pharmacy education and research.

Sue’s research interests are directed towards optimising the clinical use of medications. General areas of research include quality use of medicines, clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Sue supervises a number of postgraduate students and is actively involved in innovation in the pharmacy profession, pushing the professional boundaries. She is committed to enhancing the role of the health care team in optimising consumer health outcomes.

Research Interests

  • Quality use of Medicines
    Numerous projects designed to improve how medicines are used - particular interests in health care teams, including consumers; rural health; medication use and misuse and international comparisons of prescription medication use
  • Clinical pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics
    Many projects being undertaken to define better dosing options to give improved patient outcomes - eg. in people who have received organ transplants (tacrolimus, mycophenolate, sirolimus) or who need other immunosuppressants (eg. leflunomide in people with rheumatoid arthritis).

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Sydney
  • Bachelor of Pharmacy (Honours), The University of Sydney

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Improving dosing of immunosuppressant medications in people who have received solid organ transplants. Studies with tacrolimus, mycophenolate or sirolimus can be offered

  • International comparisons of the use of prescription medicines are important to improve the quality use of medicines across different jurisdictions. Lessons learned from one area can be translated into interventions to be applied to improve medicine use across a number of different health care systems

  • Many factors are know to affect prescribing and use of medicines. Projects in this area will be designed to investigate specific aspects of these factors eg. effects of remote location, influence of free sample medications etc etc

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Tran, H. and Tett, S. E. (2004). Therapeutic drug monitoring in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In K. Atkinson, W. E. Fibbe, R. Champlin, P. Ljungman, J. Ritz and M. K. Brenner (Ed.), Clinical Bone Marrow and Blood Stem Cell Transplantation 3rd ed. (pp. 505-514) Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

  • Tett, S. E. (2001). Rheumatology. In J. Hughes, R. Donnelly and G. James-Chatgilaou (Ed.), Clinical Pharmacy: A Practical Approach 2nd Edition 2 ed. (pp. 341-350) Melbourne: Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia.

  • Tett, S. E (2000). Therapeutic drug monitoring in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. In K. Atkinson (Ed.), Clinical Bone Marrow and Blood Stem Cell Transplantation 1 ed. (pp. 193-200) Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Improving dosing of immunosuppressant medications in people who have received solid organ transplants. Studies with tacrolimus, mycophenolate or sirolimus can be offered

  • International comparisons of the use of prescription medicines are important to improve the quality use of medicines across different jurisdictions. Lessons learned from one area can be translated into interventions to be applied to improve medicine use across a number of different health care systems

  • Many factors are know to affect prescribing and use of medicines. Projects in this area will be designed to investigate specific aspects of these factors eg. effects of remote location, influence of free sample medications etc etc

  • Drug usage evaluation, including the feedback, intervention and re-evaluation stages can influence how medicines are prescribed and used. Multicentre studies can have wide ranging influence, and studies across several jurisdictions (eg. hospital/community; public/private) can influence quality use of medicines in sustainable ways across large geographical areas. Projects are offered in the areas, particularly focussing on multi-disciplinary teams and multi-jurisdictional influences