Dr Moe Thuzar

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute
Faculty of Medicine

Academic Title-Senior Lecturer

Princess Alexandra Hospital Southside Clinical Unit
Faculty of Medicine
m.thuzar@uq.edu.au
+61 7 3176 2111

Overview

Moe Thuzar is an Endocrinologist at the Princess Alexandra Hospital and a Senior Lecturer (adjunct) at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane. She has a strong research interest in the Neuroendocrine Regulation of Metabolism and Cardiovascular Health in Humans. After completing her specialist training and receiving FRACP (Fellowship of the Royal Australasian College of Physicians) in early 2014, she undertook her PhD study (2014-2018, UQ) investigating the role of adrenal neuroendocrine system in the regulation of human brown adipose tissue and energy metabolism under the supervision of Professor Ken Ho. She has received numerous awards for her novel work, including Australasian Women in Endocrinology Young Investigator Award (2017), Outstanding Abstract Award (2016) and Presidential Poster Awards for Excellence in Cardiovascular Endocrinology Research (2017) and in Adipocyte Biology Research (2017) from the US Endocrine Society, Early Career Researcher Award from the Australian & New Zealand Obesity Society (2016) and been selected as a finalist for the Prestigious Bryan Hudson Clinical Endocrinology Award by the Endocrine Society of Australia, and the Queensland Health & Medical Research Award (Previously “Premier’s award”) by the Australian Society of Medical Research. Moe has recently joined the Endocrine Hypertension Unit of Professor Michael Stowasser at the UQDI, pursuing further research in Cardiovascular Endocrinology, in particular, elucidating the potential novel effects of the Mineralocorticoid System and its interaction with other systems.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland

Publications

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Available Projects

  • This project involves a randomised clinical trial designed to investigate the potential novel metabolic benefits of Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism and to elucidate the mechanistic changes underlying the metabolic benefits conferred by MR antagonism in humans.

    MRs are hormone receptors present in high abundance on fat cells of obese subjects. Metabolic syndrome is commonly found with mineralocorticoid hormone excess (primary hyperaldosteronism) and in the general population, mineralocorticoid level is predictive of obesity and metabolic diseases. There is strong evidence in animals that blocking MRs (MR antagonism) protects against obesity and metabolic complications. It is not known if similar mechanisms operate in humans.

    This project will help define the novel therapeutic potential of MR antagonists for management of obesity and metabolic diseases in humans. The results may also offer unique physiological insights into the underlying mechanisms modulating metabolic health for future research and development.

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Publications

Featured Publications

Journal Article

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • This project involves a randomised clinical trial designed to investigate the potential novel metabolic benefits of Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism and to elucidate the mechanistic changes underlying the metabolic benefits conferred by MR antagonism in humans.

    MRs are hormone receptors present in high abundance on fat cells of obese subjects. Metabolic syndrome is commonly found with mineralocorticoid hormone excess (primary hyperaldosteronism) and in the general population, mineralocorticoid level is predictive of obesity and metabolic diseases. There is strong evidence in animals that blocking MRs (MR antagonism) protects against obesity and metabolic complications. It is not known if similar mechanisms operate in humans.

    This project will help define the novel therapeutic potential of MR antagonists for management of obesity and metabolic diseases in humans. The results may also offer unique physiological insights into the underlying mechanisms modulating metabolic health for future research and development.