Dr Germain Fernando

Adjunct Associate Professor

School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
Faculty of Science

Overview

Dr Fernando's current research interests include developing needle-free, pain-free, skin patch vaccines. Influenza and human papilloma virus vaccines are used as model vaccines in these studies.

Dr Germain Fernando completed PhD at the University of Arizona, USA, and did post-doctoral research at the Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA, before joining the University of Queensland in 1989. He has been working in the field of vaccinology for the last 28 years. He has a H-Index of 36.

He is a Senior Consultant at Vaxxas Pty. Ltd, Brisbane, Australia

Publications and Citation Metrics are available at the following website:

http://www.researcherid.com/rid/C-3733-2009

Research Interests

  • Vaccinations using a novel needle-free, pain-free, skin patch.
    Although effective vaccines are available for combating diseases such as flu and cervical cancer, some people are reluctant to get vaccinated because of the fear of the needle. The needle and syringe first invented in 1853 is still being used because of the convenience to the person administering the vaccine. However this method has many disadvantages: Fear of the needle and the pain of injection, especially among children. Furthermore injection into muscle is less efficient than delivering the vaccine directly to immunologically active cells in the skin. We have designed a skin patch to overcome these disadvantages. We have recently published data to show potent immunity can be induced using very low doses of vaccine delivered by the skin patch. Reference: Fernando et al PLoS One 2010 April 21:5(4), e 10266.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Arizona
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), University of Ceylon

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • 1). Delivering of vaccines using a novel skin patch that is needle-free and pain-free which induces potent immune responses. Study of mechanisms.

    2). Developing Universal Influenza Vaccines that protect people from new strains of virus.

    3). Translating the skin patch vaccine delivery system from animal models to human clinical testing.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book Chapter

  • Frazer, I. H., Tindle, R. W., Fernando, G. J., Malcolm, K. M., Herd, K. A., McFadyen, S. M., Cooper, P. D. and Ward, B. G. (1999). Safety and Immunogenicity of HPV16 E7/Algammulin. In R. W. Tindle (Ed.), Vaccines for Human Papillomavirus Infection and Anogenital Disease (pp. 91-104) Austin, USA: R.G. Landes Company.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • 1). Delivering of vaccines using a novel skin patch that is needle-free and pain-free which induces potent immune responses. Study of mechanisms.

    2). Developing Universal Influenza Vaccines that protect people from new strains of virus.

    3). Translating the skin patch vaccine delivery system from animal models to human clinical testing.