Professor Sue Kildea

Professor of Midwifery

School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences

Professor of Midwifery

Mater Research Institute-UQ
Faculty of Medicine

Affiliate Professor Level E

UQ Poche Centre for Indigenous Health

Overview

Sue Kildea holds a Clinical Chair in Midwifery and is a joint appointment between the Mater Health Services and Mater Research Institute Brisbane and the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work, University of Queensland. She is a registered nurse midwife with clinical, management, policy, education and research experience across both acute and primary health care settings. Sue is a strong collaborative researcher and many of her research projects aim to make a difference to the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families. Together with a Senior Elder from Maningrida in Arnhem Land she was a joint recipient of the UTS Human Rights Award for contribution to advancing reconciliation between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians (2004). Sue has expertise in health services research, epidemiology, qualitative and evaluation methods, participatory action research and randomised trials. Sue has particular expertise in introducing and evaluating innovative models of maternity service delivery, translating research into practice, leading research across distances. Sue is an active clinician, is still working as a midwife and has worked internationally and provided technical expertise for the World Health and other organisations in Indonesia, Viet Nam, Mongolia and Geneva.

Photo: by Anjanette Webb

Research Interests

  • Maternity care
  • Indigenous Health
  • Midwifery

Qualifications

  • Graduate Certificate in Higher Education, University of Technology Sydney
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Technology Sydney
  • Bachelor of Health Science in Nursing, Southern Cross University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Master Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • This research project is being offered in the Midwifery Research Unit (a joint collaboration between the Mater Health Service, the Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ) and the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work–UQ) within a 5-year NHMRC funded study: The Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting (IBUS) study.

    This multi-agency project is evaluating models of maternity care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in South East Queensland. It is a collaborative project developed by three Brisbane-based organisations that have formed a partnership: The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Ltd, the Mater Health Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane Ltd. The partners are collaborating with The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital to conduct this work RHD opportunity 1: 'Stop Smoking in its Tracks' – an IBUS sub-study Antenatal smoking is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and is the most important modifiable cause of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including perinatal death, preterm birth, low birth weight, growth retardation and placental problems. Smoking among pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women remains more than three times as common as among non-Indigenous pregnant women, yet there is little evidence of the best way to address this problem. As part of the Birthing in Our Community program, we will be implementing a novel smoking cessation program - "Stop Smoking in its Tracks" program. This is a service-based research project investigating the impact of intensive follow up and support for women from early pregnancy through to 6 months following birth, along with reward payments to encourage sustained smoking cessation. Stop Smoking in its Tracks will also offer support, including Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) to family members who smoke. This study will assess the effectiveness, acceptability and feasibility of providing "Stop Smoking in its Tracks." It will involve collection of data on the care provided, women's quitting behaviour and factors associated with quit attempts and successful quitting. Women will also complete a short questionnaire about their experiences of the program. This would ideally suit someone with a background in Aboriginal health, health promotion, midwifery or child health nursing, public health, addiction studies or related fields.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

    The successful appointees will be very well supported to conduct this research. They will work side by side with a national team of investigators and partners from The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, the Mater Health Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane Ltd and the University of Queensland.

    The person Applicants should hold a qualification in a relevant field. It is essential that applicants can demonstrate experience in the field of health or research in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly in the area of Maternal-Infant health. A current and valid driver's licence is also necessary, with the ability to work on campus and off-site, in community and domestic setting, using their own car. There is the opportunity for successful applicants to first enrol in MPhil and upgrade to a PhD. Strong academic performance, good oral and written communication skills in English, and published output will be looked on favourably.

    Applicants must be eligible to enrol in a MPhil of PhD with the University of Queensland. For a complete list of the University of Queensland's minimum entry requirements please refer to:http://www.uq.edu.au/grad-school/our-research-degrees.

    To discuss this role please contact Sophie Hickey on sophie.hickey@mater.uq.edu.au or phone 07 3163 1901.

  • This research project is being offered in the Midwifery Research Unit (a joint collaboration between the Mater Health Service, the Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ) and the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work–UQ) within a 5-year NHMRC funded study: The Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting (IBUS) study.

    This multi-agency project is evaluating models of maternity care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in South East Queensland. It is a collaborative project developed by three Brisbane-based organisations that have formed a partnership: The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Ltd, the Mater Health Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane Ltd. The partners are collaborating with The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital to conduct this work

    The importance of optimal infant growth and development is well known. To date, it is not known to what extent commonly used infant developmental assessment tools are culturally appropriate for use with Indigenous infants raised in an urban setting. This sub-study will include culturally validating infant child assessments tools such as the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire with an urban Indigenous population. Experience in conducting infant assessments is desirable. If not already a qualified assessor, the successful candidate will be supported to undertake training to become accredited. Training will be fully supported by the project. This would ideally suit someone with a background in Aboriginal health, midwifery or child health nursing, developmental psychology or related fields.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

    The successful appointees will be very well supported to conduct this research. They will work side by side with a national team of investigators and partners from The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, the Mater Health Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane Ltd and the University of Queensland.

    The person Applicants should hold a qualification in a relevant field. It is essential that applicants can demonstrate experience in the field of health or research in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly in the area of Maternal-Infant health. A current and valid driver's licence is also necessary, with the ability to work on campus and off-site, in community and domestic setting, using their own car. There is the opportunity for successful applicants to first enrol in MPhil and upgrade to a PhD. Strong academic performance, good oral and written communication skills in English, and published output will be looked on favourably.

    Applicants must be eligible to enrol in a MPhil of PhD with the University of Queensland. For a complete list of the University of Queensland's minimum entry requirements please refer to:http://www.uq.edu.au/grad-school/our-research-degrees.

    To discuss this role please contact Gabrielle Simcock on gabrielle.simcock@mater.uq.edu.au or Sophie Hickey on sophie.hickey@mater.uq.edu.au or phone 07 3163 1901.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

  • Dawes, Alison, Mustapha, Alison, Donnelly, Allan, Sanburg, Amanda, Bisits, Andrew, Lee, Andrew, McCallum, Andrew, White, Andrew, Sneddon, Anne, Brown, Anthony, Silver, Bronwyn, Simmons, Bruce, Steiner, Caitlin, Boardman, Claire, Ellwood, David, Boldiston, Donald, Chung, Donna, Reed, Duncan, Gleeson, Glenda, Maguire, Graeme, McHugh, Greg, Dahlen, Hannah, Mumme, Heather, Land, Helen, Taylor, Hugh, Warnock, Jason, Alison, Jenny, May, Jenny, Ball, Jonathon, Gardiner, Judith, Stewart, Julie, Currie, Kathy, Sullivan, Katie, Edwards, Keith, de Decker, Koen, Bowell, Libby, Little, Lucy, Arkapaw, Lukas, Byers, Lyn, Young, Lyndall, O'Brien, Margaret, Nicholl, Michael, Williams, Nick, Wood, Pamela, Markey, Peter, May, Peter, Morris, Peter, Carroll, Raelene, Narasimhan, Rishi, Knight, Sabina, Larkins, Sarah, Johnson, Sharon, Soloman, Shaun, Crowther, Shelley, Alexander, Sheryl, Sandford, Shona, Kane, Simon, Margolis, Steve, Milanese, Steve, Doherty, Steven, Gordon, Susan, Kildea, Sue, Orsmond, Sue, Howell, Susan, Henderson, Timothy, Bowyer, Wendy and Li, Zi Clinical procedures manual for remote and rural practice: supporting clinical practice in the bush 3rd ed. Edited by Sabina Knight, Andrew White, Caitlin Steiner, Chris Del Mar, Christine Connors, Frances Vaughan, Janet Struber, Jo Wright, Kerrie Gell, Nick Williams, George Tripe, Peter McCormack and Rosemary Schmidt Alice Spring, NT, Australia: Centre for Remote Health, 2014.

  • Drogeuller, Adeline, Latif, Ahmed, Bisits, Andrew, Sneddon, Anne, Preston-Thomas, Annie, Steiner, Caitlin, Homer, Caroline, Chapple, Cathy, Costello, Craig, Ellwood, David, Gleeson, Glenda, Paterson-Walley, Glenda, Dahlen, Hannah, Hanock, Heather, Knox, Janet, Delima, Jennifer, Lakshmi, Jhansi, David, Josh, Gardiner, Judith, Sullivan, Katie, Scott, Lesley, Marshall, Lewis, Dennis, Louise, Little, Lucy, Young, Lyndall, O'Brien, Margaret, Haliday, Megan, Nicholl, Michael, Luey, Michele, Boddington, Michelle, Ryder, Nathan, Lee, Nigel, Lawton, Paul, May, Peter, Carroll, Raelene, Lewandowski, Raymond, Apelt, Rita, Batey, Robert, Fahy, Rose, Edmonds, Sally, Jackson, Sarah, Alexander, Sheryl, Kane, Simon, Chitturi, Sridhar,, Kildea, Sue, Kruske, Sue, Roth, Sue, Yip, Teem-Wing, Hourigan, Tina, Page, Vanessa and Walsh, Warren Minymaku Kutja Tjukurpa: Women's Business Manual: Literal translation: 'Women Only Story' 5th Edition ed. Alice Spring, NT, Australia: Centre for Remote Health, 2014.

  • Kildea, Sue, Magick, Dennis F. and Stapleton, Helen (2012) Birthing on country: workshop report Brisbane, Australia: Maternity Services Inter-Jurisdictional Committee

  • Kildea, Sue and Van Wagner, Vicki (2012) ‘Birthing on Country’ maternity service delivery models: a rapid review Haymarket, NSW Australia: Sax Institute

  • Lamb, T., Stapleton, H., Low, N. and Kildea, S. (2012) Mater Mothers' Hospital Murri Antenatal Clinic: planning future services at the World Café Workshop Brisbane, QLD, Australia: Midwifery Research Unit, Mater Mothers’ Hospitals and Australian Catholic University

  • Stapleton, H., Murphy, R. and Kildea, S. (2011) Evaluation of the Mater Mothers’ Hospital's Murri Antenatal Clinic Not available:

  • Stapleton, H., Murphy, R. and Kildea, S. (2011) The CHAMP antenatal service: report on the qualitative component to a quality assurance project Not available:

  • Kruske, Sue, Kildea, Sue and Sherwood, Juanita (2010) Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women: providing maternity care Not available: Not available

  • Wild, Kayli, Rumbold, Alice, Maypilama, Lawurrpa, Boyle, Jacqui, Kildea, Sue and Barclay, Leslie Checking for problems with the baby in early pregnancy: it's your choice to test for Down Syndrome and neural tube defects. Darwin, NT, Australia: Menzies School of Health Research, 2010.

  • Stapleton, Helen, Murphy, Rebecca, Correa-Velez, Ignacio and Kildea, Sue (2010) Evaluation of the Mater Mothers' Hospital's Refugee Antenatal Clinic Not available:

  • Kildea, Sue Maternal deaths in Australia: 2000-2002. Edited by Elizabeth A. Sullivan and James F. King Randwick, NSW, Australia: National Perinatal Epidemiology and Statistics Unit, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2006.

Book Chapter

  • Kruske, Sue, Lenthall, Sue, Kildea, Sue, Knight, Sabina, Mackay, Beverley and Hegney, Desley G. (2012). Rural and remote area nursing. In Diane Brown and Helen Edwards (Ed.), Lewis's Medical-Surgical Nursing: Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems 3rd ed. (pp. 208-219) Chatswood, NSW, Australia: Mosby.

  • Kildea, Sue, Kruske, Sue and Sherwood, Juanita (2010). Midwives working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women. In Sally Pairman, Jan Pincombe, Sally K. Tracy and Carol Thorogood (Ed.), Midwifery: Preparation for Practice 2nd ed. (pp. 162-176) Chatswood, NSW Australia: Churchill Livingstone.

  • Kildea, Sue and Wardaguga, M. (2009). Childbirth in Australia: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women. In Helaine Selin and Pamela K. Stone (Ed.), Childbirth across cultures: ideas and practices of pregnancy, childbirth and the postpartum (pp. 275-286) New York, NY, United States: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-90-481-2599-9_26

  • Kruske, S., Lenthall, S., Kildea, S., Knight, S., Mackay, V. and Hegney, Desley G. (2008). Rural and remote area nursing. In Diane Brown, Helen Edwards, Diane Brown and Helen Edwards (Ed.), Lewis's Medical-Surgical Nursing Assessment and Management of Clinical Problems 2nd ed. (pp. 200-214) Australia: Academic Press (Elsevier Press).

  • Kruske, S., Lenthall, S., Kildea, S., Knight, S., Mackay, B. and Hegney, D. (2007). Rural and remote area nursing. In Lewis's medical-surgical nursing: Assessment and Management of clinical problems 2 ed. (pp. 200-215) Australia: Elsevier Australia.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Master Philosophy — Joint Principal Advisor

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • This research project is being offered in the Midwifery Research Unit (a joint collaboration between the Mater Health Service, the Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ) and the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work–UQ) within a 5-year NHMRC funded study: The Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting (IBUS) study.

    This multi-agency project is evaluating models of maternity care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in South East Queensland. It is a collaborative project developed by three Brisbane-based organisations that have formed a partnership: The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Ltd, the Mater Health Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane Ltd. The partners are collaborating with The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital to conduct this work RHD opportunity 1: 'Stop Smoking in its Tracks' – an IBUS sub-study Antenatal smoking is associated with significant morbidity and mortality and is the most important modifiable cause of adverse pregnancy outcomes, including perinatal death, preterm birth, low birth weight, growth retardation and placental problems. Smoking among pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women remains more than three times as common as among non-Indigenous pregnant women, yet there is little evidence of the best way to address this problem. As part of the Birthing in Our Community program, we will be implementing a novel smoking cessation program - "Stop Smoking in its Tracks" program. This is a service-based research project investigating the impact of intensive follow up and support for women from early pregnancy through to 6 months following birth, along with reward payments to encourage sustained smoking cessation. Stop Smoking in its Tracks will also offer support, including Nicotine Replacement Therapy (NRT) to family members who smoke. This study will assess the effectiveness, acceptability and feasibility of providing "Stop Smoking in its Tracks." It will involve collection of data on the care provided, women's quitting behaviour and factors associated with quit attempts and successful quitting. Women will also complete a short questionnaire about their experiences of the program. This would ideally suit someone with a background in Aboriginal health, health promotion, midwifery or child health nursing, public health, addiction studies or related fields.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

    The successful appointees will be very well supported to conduct this research. They will work side by side with a national team of investigators and partners from The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, the Mater Health Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane Ltd and the University of Queensland.

    The person Applicants should hold a qualification in a relevant field. It is essential that applicants can demonstrate experience in the field of health or research in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly in the area of Maternal-Infant health. A current and valid driver's licence is also necessary, with the ability to work on campus and off-site, in community and domestic setting, using their own car. There is the opportunity for successful applicants to first enrol in MPhil and upgrade to a PhD. Strong academic performance, good oral and written communication skills in English, and published output will be looked on favourably.

    Applicants must be eligible to enrol in a MPhil of PhD with the University of Queensland. For a complete list of the University of Queensland's minimum entry requirements please refer to:http://www.uq.edu.au/grad-school/our-research-degrees.

    To discuss this role please contact Sophie Hickey on sophie.hickey@mater.uq.edu.au or phone 07 3163 1901.

  • This research project is being offered in the Midwifery Research Unit (a joint collaboration between the Mater Health Service, the Mater Research Institute-UQ (MRI-UQ) and the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work–UQ) within a 5-year NHMRC funded study: The Indigenous Birthing in an Urban Setting (IBUS) study.

    This multi-agency project is evaluating models of maternity care for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women in South East Queensland. It is a collaborative project developed by three Brisbane-based organisations that have formed a partnership: The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health Ltd, the Mater Health Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane Ltd. The partners are collaborating with The Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital to conduct this work

    The importance of optimal infant growth and development is well known. To date, it is not known to what extent commonly used infant developmental assessment tools are culturally appropriate for use with Indigenous infants raised in an urban setting. This sub-study will include culturally validating infant child assessments tools such as the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development and the Ages and Stages Questionnaire with an urban Indigenous population. Experience in conducting infant assessments is desirable. If not already a qualified assessor, the successful candidate will be supported to undertake training to become accredited. Training will be fully supported by the project. This would ideally suit someone with a background in Aboriginal health, midwifery or child health nursing, developmental psychology or related fields.

    Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are strongly encouraged to apply.

    The successful appointees will be very well supported to conduct this research. They will work side by side with a national team of investigators and partners from The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, the Mater Health Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Health Service, Brisbane Ltd and the University of Queensland.

    The person Applicants should hold a qualification in a relevant field. It is essential that applicants can demonstrate experience in the field of health or research in relation to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, particularly in the area of Maternal-Infant health. A current and valid driver's licence is also necessary, with the ability to work on campus and off-site, in community and domestic setting, using their own car. There is the opportunity for successful applicants to first enrol in MPhil and upgrade to a PhD. Strong academic performance, good oral and written communication skills in English, and published output will be looked on favourably.

    Applicants must be eligible to enrol in a MPhil of PhD with the University of Queensland. For a complete list of the University of Queensland's minimum entry requirements please refer to:http://www.uq.edu.au/grad-school/our-research-degrees.

    To discuss this role please contact Gabrielle Simcock on gabrielle.simcock@mater.uq.edu.au or Sophie Hickey on sophie.hickey@mater.uq.edu.au or phone 07 3163 1901.