The molecular basis of macropinocytosis in mammalian cells: the composition of endosome proteins and their function (2007–2009)

Abstract:
The regulated movement of membrane receptors and ligands between the cell surface and intracellular compartments is vital to many cellular operations including nutrient uptake and interactions with both the extracellular environment and other nearby cells. However, the molecular details of these sorting events remain poorly defined. This research aims to systematically define the protein composition of the intracellular compartment, endosomes. The function of the proteins, associated with one biological process occuring in endosomes, macropinosomes will be examined in detail. This process is required to reorganise the plasma membrane during cell locomotion and also represents a major entry path for pathogens like HIV.
Grant type:
ARC Discovery Projects
Researchers:
  • Associate Professor
    School of Biomedical Sciences
    Faculty of Medicine
    Affiliate Associate Professor
    School of Biomedical Sciences
    Faculty of Medicine
  • Professorial Research Fellow - GL
    Institute for Molecular Bioscience
    Affiliated Professor
    School of Biomedical Sciences
    Faculty of Medicine
Funded by:
Australian Research Council