Dr Sam Hollingworth

Honorary Senior Lecturer

School of Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences

Overview

I am an academic and consultant working in global health with a focus on health technology assessment (HTA), health systems and services research, and the use of medicines in populations. I have a particular interest in the use of data and research for evidence-informed decision making and implementation science in the context of low and middle income countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa.I have worked on international health projects in Indonesia and am currently working on several projects in HTA and medicines use in Ghana and sub-Saharan Africa. I work with an extensive network of clinicians and health professionals to investigate the use of medicines and adverse effects in general practice, cancer, psychiatry, neurology, and internal medicine. I have honorary or visiting appointments at the University of Queensland (UQ, Brisbane, Australia), Imperial College London (UK, International Decision Support Initiative) and Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST, Kumasi, Ghana). I have a BSc(Hons) and MPH from UQ and a PhD from Monash University. I have lived or worked in Australia (Brisbane, Melbourne), Canada (Toronto), Indonesia (Yogyakarta), UK (London), and Ghana (Accra, Kumasi). I worked as a consultant in HTA in Australia for many years evaluating submissions to subsidise medicines on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS). I am an experinced teacher havng coordinated courses, lectured, and tutored in undergraduate and postgraduate programs. I was a foundation coordinator in the UQ Master of Pharmaceutical Industry Practice (from 2019). I am an advisor on diverse PhD and student research projects.

Research Interests

  • Health technology assessment (HTA) and decision-making
    Working with partners in low and middle income countries to manage and allocate their finite resources to ensure their healthcare systems meet the need for universal healthcare coverage efficiently and equitably
  • Economic evaluations within health care and evidence-based practice
    Critically appraising the quality of evidence and ‘value for money’ of medicines and health services
  • Use of medicines in populations (pharmacoepidemiology)
    Exploring the use of medicines and their side effects using routinely collected data and describing the ‘real world’ effectiveness of medicines (e.g. in cancer)
  • Health systems, services, and medicines in non-communicable diseases
    Describing the use of medicines and other health services to treat non-communicable diseases (NCDs) with a focus on low and middle income countries

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science, The University of Queensland
  • Master of Public Health, The University of Queensland
  • PhD, Monash University
  • Bachelor of Science(hons), The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • How are medicines used in the real world after registration and public subsidy? Are we using them in the most effective way possible? We can use routinely collected data to investigate the use of medicines and their side effects in populations.

  • How do we decide which health services and medicines to use in our health systems? Health Technology Assessment (HTA, including economic evaluations) is a tool to help answer the questions: does it work and is it good value for money? I work with an international consortium and partners in Ghana to help them manage and allocate their finite resources to ensure their healthcare systems meet the need for universal healthcare coverage efficiently and equitably.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • del Mar, Chris, Bennett, Sally, Abell, Bridgett, Boyle, Malcolm, Hill, Kylie, Hollingworth, Samantha, Lewis, Courtney, Noffs, Gustavo, Rickard, Claire, Sanders, Sharon, Schneider, Michal, Stedeman, Inge and Vogel, Adam (2017). Questions about diagnosis: examples of appraisals from different health professions. Evidence-based practice across the health professions. (pp. 159-184) edited by Tammy Hoffmann, Sally Bennett and Chris Del Mar. Chatswood, NSW, Australia: Elsevier.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Note for students: Dr Sam Hollingworth is not currently available to take on new students.

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

Dr Sam Hollingworth is not currently available to take on new students.

  • How are medicines used in the real world after registration and public subsidy? Are we using them in the most effective way possible? We can use routinely collected data to investigate the use of medicines and their side effects in populations.

  • How do we decide which health services and medicines to use in our health systems? Health Technology Assessment (HTA, including economic evaluations) is a tool to help answer the questions: does it work and is it good value for money? I work with an international consortium and partners in Ghana to help them manage and allocate their finite resources to ensure their healthcare systems meet the need for universal healthcare coverage efficiently and equitably.