Dr Michelle Smith

Senior Lecturer in Physiotherapy

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
m.smith5@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 54660

Overview

Dr Michelle Smith is a Senior Lecturer in Physiotherapy and Program Director for the Masters of Physiotherapy (Studies) and Masters of Physiotherapy (Sports) degrees within the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences at The University of Queensland. She is a titled Sports and Exercise Physiotherapist with a Masters degree in Sports Physiotherapy and a PhD in Physiotherapy. Dr Smith's research focuses on improving quality of life and sport, physical activity and work participation in people with lower limb musculoskeletal pain conditions across the lifespan. She has a particular interest in the prevention and management of ankle and knee injuries. Dr Smith's research has investigated the implementation of knee and ankle injury prevention interventions in female adolescent athletes and the management of ligament injuries and their sequella (i.e., chronic ankle instability and ankle/knee osteoarthritis).

Michelle has presented her research at national and international multi-disciplinary conferences, including keynote and invited presentation. She teaches across the undergraduate and postgraduate physiotherapy curriculum in the areas of musculoskeletal health and sports injuries. She has been recognised for her high teaching quality and impact at both School and Faculty levels through receipt of Teaching Excellence Awards. She is the Chair of the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Workplace Health and Safety Committee, Chair of the School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences External Engagement Committee and Chair of the Queensland Sports and Exercise Physiotherapy Group of the Austrailan Physiotherapy Association.

Research Interests

  • Ankle osteoarthritis
  • Ankle sprains and fractures
  • Knee osteoarthritis
  • Injury prevention
  • Sports physiotherapy

Qualifications

  • Graduate Certificate in Higher Education, The University of Queensland
  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Physical Education, University of Manitoba
  • Bachelor of Medical Rehabilitation, University of Manitoba
  • Master of Physiotherapy, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Ankle sprains are often perceived to be minor injuries, but unfortunately a high proportion of people who sprain or fracture their ankle go onto experience long-term problems, such as chronic ankle instability and ankle osteoarthritis. These consequences of an ankle injury can be associated with persistent pain and impairments in function.

    Options for PhD projects in this area include:

    • Prevention and management of ankle injuries in children and adolescents
    • Improving patient outcomes after ankle sprains and fractures
    • Early detection and management of ankle osteoarthritis
  • Adolescents have high rates of sport participation with many playing multiple sports at school and in the community. Apophyseal growth plate conditions, such as Osgood-Schlatter disease, occur in active adolescents but little is known about how best to manage them. Many sports have developed injury prevention programs to try to decrease injury rates and optimise sport participation. However, injury prevention program implementation is challenging and effectiveness in many sports is not known.

    Options for PhD projects in this area include:

    • The presentation and management of Osgood-Schlatter disease in active adolescents
    • Improving the implementation and effectiveness of injury prevention programs in sport
    • Injuries in female and male athletes: should injury prevention and management approaches be the same?
  • Clinical guidelines for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis recommend exercise, education and weight management as first-line treatment. There is evidence that this approach to management improves physical function and quality of life and leads to reduced sick leave and pain medication over 12 months. The effectiveness of non-surgical management in reducing or delaying the need for joint arthroplasty is less clear.

    Options for PhD projects in this area include:

    • Improvements in impairments, pain and function after an exercise, education and weight management intervention for hip and knee osteoarthritis
    • Exercise, education and weight management for hip and knee osteoarthritis and rates of joint arthroplasty

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Vicenzino, Bill, Smith, Michelle and Bisset, Leanne (2011). The elbow and forearm complex. Exercise therapy in the management of musculoskeletal disorders. (pp. 113-128) Oxford, United Kingdom: Blackwell Publishing.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Ankle sprains are often perceived to be minor injuries, but unfortunately a high proportion of people who sprain or fracture their ankle go onto experience long-term problems, such as chronic ankle instability and ankle osteoarthritis. These consequences of an ankle injury can be associated with persistent pain and impairments in function.

    Options for PhD projects in this area include:

    • Prevention and management of ankle injuries in children and adolescents
    • Improving patient outcomes after ankle sprains and fractures
    • Early detection and management of ankle osteoarthritis
  • Adolescents have high rates of sport participation with many playing multiple sports at school and in the community. Apophyseal growth plate conditions, such as Osgood-Schlatter disease, occur in active adolescents but little is known about how best to manage them. Many sports have developed injury prevention programs to try to decrease injury rates and optimise sport participation. However, injury prevention program implementation is challenging and effectiveness in many sports is not known.

    Options for PhD projects in this area include:

    • The presentation and management of Osgood-Schlatter disease in active adolescents
    • Improving the implementation and effectiveness of injury prevention programs in sport
    • Injuries in female and male athletes: should injury prevention and management approaches be the same?
  • Clinical guidelines for the management of hip and knee osteoarthritis recommend exercise, education and weight management as first-line treatment. There is evidence that this approach to management improves physical function and quality of life and leads to reduced sick leave and pain medication over 12 months. The effectiveness of non-surgical management in reducing or delaying the need for joint arthroplasty is less clear.

    Options for PhD projects in this area include:

    • Improvements in impairments, pain and function after an exercise, education and weight management intervention for hip and knee osteoarthritis
    • Exercise, education and weight management for hip and knee osteoarthritis and rates of joint arthroplasty