Dr Camille Guillerey

ARC DECRA

Mater Research Institute-UQ
Faculty of Medicine

Overview

Dr Camille Guillerey is a Senior Research Officer in the Cancer Immunotherapies laboratory at Mater Research. She leads a small team of 3 researchers and students.

Dr Guillerey completed her PhD in Immunology at the Pasteur Institute of Paris, France. In 2014, she moved to Australia to study Cancer Immunonology at QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute. Dr Guillerey joined Kristen Radford's laboratory at Mater Research in late 2018 to establish an independent research program investigating immune responses to hematological cancers.

Dr Guillerey's research is currently focused on Natural Killer cells, a population of immune cells that recognise and kill cancer cells. She aims to identify mechanisms that may prevent Natural Killer cells from eliminating cancer cells and apply these findings to develop new treatments for childhood leukemia.

Research Impacts

Dr Guillerey has authored 25 publications, and has received more than $900,000 in competitive funding from NHMRC, Cancer Australia, Cure Cancer Australia and the Children Hospital Foundation. Through this research, Dr Guillerey has made integral contributions to improve knowledge on immune responses to blood cancers. She identified the immune molecules TIGIT and CD137 as promising targets in immune multiple myeloma, an incurable blood cancer. Her research contributions have been recognized with her nomination as a finalist for the 2019 Women in Technology rising star award.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Paris

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • PROJECT TITLE: Immune regulation through bi-directional interactions between subsets of Natural Killer cells and Dendritic cells.

    ABOUT THE PROJECT

    This project will investigate interactions between two immune cell types: natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs). NK cells play an essential role in the early detection of infections or malignant transformation while DCs initiate and direct immune responses. Evidence for bi-directional interactions between NK cells and DCs has been provided in the early 2000s. Since then, our knowledge of NK cell and DC diversity has considerably increased. NK cells and DCs can no longer be considered as homogenous populations up to 30,000 phenotypic populations identified by mass cytometry in one individual while four main human DC subsets have been described: monocyte-derived DCs, plasmacytoid DCs and type 1 and 2 conventional DCs. Currently, we don’t know which NK subset(s) interact with which DC subset(s).

    This project aims to provide a better understanding of the crosstalk between distinct NK cell and DC subsets. Specific interactions between human cell subsets in response to different stimuli will be investigated in vitro and in vivo. The candidate will have access to state-of-the-art technology including high-parameter flow cytometry (BD Fortessa and BD FACSymphony analysers) as well as cutting-edge humanised mouse models. By addressing an important knowledge gap in the field, this project will lay the foundation for preclinical research in a wide range of pathologies including cancer, infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders.

    SCHOLARSHIP

    The candidate will be enrolled in the PhD program at the University of Queensland and will receive a UQ PhD Scholarship. Stipend is valued at $28k per annum for 3 years.

    THE TEAM

    The project will be performed in the Cancer Immunotherapies laboratory at Mater Research, located at the Translational Research Institute in Brisbane. Our laboratory is composed of 3 postdoctoral fellows, 1 research assistant and 1 PhD student. You will be directly supervised by Dr Camille Guillerey.

    We have extensive expertise in dendritic cell research and NK cell research. In addition, we have developed a unique preclinical model called humanised mice which allow the study of human immune cell interactions in vivo. Our group has an interest in cancer immunotherapies, and more particularly childhood leukaemia. We aim to provide a better understanding of immune responses to cancer and to translate it into new therapies for cancer patients.

    REQUIREMENTS

    Please note that due to current travel restrictions, we will only accept candidates (Australian and international) who are currently in Australia.

    Applicants must hold a Bachelor’s or equivalent science or medicine degree with first-class Honours, and/or a distinction in a research Masters degree in a relevant discipline (e.g. Immunology, cell biology).

    The candidate should have:

    • Excellent written and verbal English;
    • The proven ability to work both independently and as part of a team;
    • Honours I (or equivalent) and/or Masters with outstanding thesis grade or Coursework Masters with outstanding performance, particularly in research related courses.
    • Demonstrated outstanding academic achievement as evidenced by high CGPA, rank within class, academic prizes and awards
    • Strong wet lab skills (e.g. cell cultures, assays such as ELISA, ELISPOT). Experience in flow cytometry and/or with mouse handling would be advantageous
    • A candidate will perform animal work, prior experience advantageous but not essential.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Guillerey, Camille and Smyth, Mark J. (2016). NK cells and cancer immunoediting. Natural killer cells. (pp. 115-145) edited by Eric Vivier, James Di Santo and Alessandro Moretta. Switzerland: Springer. doi: 10.1007/82_2015_446

Journal Article

  • Buckle, Irina and Guillerey, Camille (2021). Inhibitory receptors and immune checkpoints regulating natural killer cell responses to cancer. Cancers, 13 (17) 4263. doi: 10.3390/cancers13174263

  • Weulersse, Marianne, Asrir, Assia, Pichler, Andrea C., Lemaitre, Lea, Braun, Matthias, Carrié, Nadège, Joubert, Marie-Véronique, Le Moine, Marie, Do Souto, Laura, Gaud, Guillaume, Das, Indrajit, Brauns, Elisa, Scarlata, Clara M., Morandi, Elena, Sundarrajan, Ashmitha, Cuisinier, Marine, Buisson, Laure, Maheo, Sabrina, Kassem, Sahar, Agesta, Arantxa, Pérès, Michaël, Verhoeyen, Els, Martinez, Alejandra, Mazieres, Julien, Dupré, Loïc, Gossye, Thomas, Pancaldi, Vera, Guillerey, Camille, Ayyoub, Maha ... Martinet, Ludovic (2020). Eomes-dependent loss of the co-activating receptor CD226 restrains CD8+ T cell anti-tumor functions and limits the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. Immunity, 53 (4), 824-839.e10. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2020.09.006

  • Guillerey, Camille, Stannard, Kimberley, Chen, Jason, Krumeich, Sophie, Miles, Kim, Nakamura, Kyohei, Smith, Jessica, Yu, Yuan, Ng, Susanna, Harjunpää, Heidi, Teng, Michele W. L., Engwerda, Christian, Belz, Gabrielle T. and Smyth, Mark J. (2020). Systemic administration of IL‐33 induces a population of circulating KLRG1 hi type 2 innate lymphoid cells and inhibits type 1 innate immunity against multiple myeloma. Immunology and Cell Biology, 99 (1) imcb.12390, 65-83. doi: 10.1111/imcb.12390

  • Harjunpaeae, H. and Guillerey, C. (2019). TIGIT as an emerging immune checkpoint. Clinical and Experimental Immunology, 200 (2) cei.13407, 108-119. doi: 10.1111/cei.13407

  • Guillerey, Camille, Nakamura, Kyohei, Pichler, Andrea C., Barkauskas, Deborah, Krumeich, Sophie, Stannard, Kimberley, Miles, Kim, Harjunpää, Heidi, Yu, Yuan, Casey, Mika, Doban, Alina I., Lazar, Mircea, Hartel, Gunter, Smith, David, Vuckovic, Slavica, Teng, Michele W.L., Bergsagel, P. Leif, Chesi, Marta, Hill, Geoffrey R., Martinet, Ludovic and Smyth, Mark J. (2019). Chemotherapy followed by anti-CD137 mAb immunotherapy improves disease control in a mouse myeloma model. JCI Insight, 4 (14) :e125932. doi: 10.1172/jci.insight.125932

  • O’Brien, Liam J., Guillerey, Camille and Radford, Kristen J. (2019). Can Dendritic Cell vaccination prevent leukemia relapse?. Cancers, 11 (6) 875, 875. doi: 10.3390/cancers11060875

  • Stannard, Kimberley A., Lemoine, Sébastien, Waterhouse, Nigel J., Vari, Frank, Chatenoud, Lucienne, Gandhi, Maher K., Martinet, Ludovic, Smyth, Mark J. and Guillerey, Camille (2019). Human peripheral blood DNAM-1neg NK cells are a terminally differentiated subset with limited effector functions. Blood Advances, 3 (11), 1681-1694. doi: 10.1182/bloodadvances.2018030676

  • Guillerey, Camille (2018). Roles of cytotoxic and helper innate lymphoid cells in cancer. Mammalian Genome, 29 (11-12), 777-789. doi: 10.1007/s00335-018-9781-4

  • Minnie, Simone A., Kuns, Rachel D., Gartlan, Kate H., Zhang, Ping, Wilkinson, Andrew N., Samson, Luke, Guillerey, Camille, Engwerda, Christian, MacDonald, Kelli P. A., Smyth, Mark J., Markey, Kate A., Vuckovic, Slavica and Hill, Geoffrey R. (2018). Myeloma escape after stem cell transplantation is a consequence of t-cell exhaustion and is prevented by tigit blockade. Blood, 132 (16), 1675-1688. doi: 10.1182/blood-2018-01-825240

  • Vuckovic, Slavica, Minnie, Simone A., Smith, David, Gartlan, Kate H., Watkins, Thomas S., Markey, Kate A., Mukhopadhyay, Pamela, Guillerey, Camille, Kuns, Rachel D., Locke, Kelly R., Pritchard, Antonia L., Johansson, Peter A., Varelias, Antiopi, Zhang, Ping, Huntington, Nicholas D., Waddell, Nicola, Chesi, Marta, Miles, John J., Smyth, Mark J. and Hill, Geoffrey R. (2018). Bone marrow transplantation generates T cell–dependent control of myeloma in mice. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 129 (1) CI98888, 106-121. doi: 10.1172/jci98888

  • Guillerey, Camille, Harjunpää, Heidi, Carrié, Nadège, Kassem, Sahar, Teo, Tricia, Miles, Kim, Krumeich, Sophie, Weulersse, Marianne, Cuisinier, Marine, Stannard, Kimberley, Yu, Yuan, Minnie, Simone A., Hill, Geoffrey R., Dougall, William C., Avet-Loiseau, Hervé, Teng, Michele W. L., Nakamura, Kyohei, Martinet, Ludovic and Smyth, Mark J. (2018). TIGIT immune checkpoint blockade restores CD8 T cell immunity against multiple myeloma. Blood, 132 (16), blood-2018. doi: 10.1182/blood-2018-01-825265

  • Oberkampf, Marine, Guillerey, Camille, Mouriès, Juliette, Rosenbaum, Pierre, Fayolle, Catherine, Bobard, Alexandre, Savina, Ariel, Ogier-Denis, Eric, Enninga, Jost, Amigorena, Sebastian, Leclerc, Claude and Dadaglio, Gilles (2018). Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species regulate the induction of CD8+ T cells by plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nature Communications, 9 (1) 2241, 2241. doi: 10.1038/s41467-018-04686-8

  • Harjunpää, Heidi, Blake, Stephen J., Ahern, Elizabeth, Allen, Stacey, Liu, Jing, Yan, Juming, Lutzky, Viviana, Takeda, Kazuyoshi, Aguilera, Amy Roman, Guillerey, Camille, Mittal, Deepak, Li, Xian Yang, Dougall, William C., Smyth, Mark J. and Teng, Michele W. L. (2018). Deficiency of host CD96 and PD-1 or TIGIT enhances tumor immunity without significantly compromising immune homeostasis. OncoImmunology, 7 (7) e1445949, e1445949. doi: 10.1080/2162402X.2018.1445949

  • Nakamura, Kyohei, Kassem, Sahar, Cleynen, Alice, Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine, Guillerey, Camille, Putz, Eva Maria, Bald, Tobias, Förster, Irmgard, Vuckovic, Slavica, Hill, Geoffrey R, Masters, Seth L, Chesi, Marta, Bergsagel, P Leif, Avet-Loiseau, Hervé, Martinet, Ludovic and Smyth, Mark J. (2018). Dysregulated IL-18 Is a key driver of immunosuppression and a possible therapeutic target in the multiple myeloma microenvironment. Cancer Cell, 33 (4), 634-648. doi: 10.1016/j.ccell.2018.02.007

  • Ng, Susanna S., Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando, Rivera, Fabian de Labastida, Amante, Fiona H., Kumar, Rajiv, Gao, Yulong, Sheel, Meru, Beattie, Lynette, de Oca, Marcela Montes, Guillerey, Camille, Edwards, Chelsea L., Faleiro, Rebecca J., Frame, Teija, Bunn, Patrick T., Vivier, Eric, Godfrey, Dale I., Pellicci, Daniel G., Lopez, J. Alejandro, Andrews, Katherine T., Huntington, Nicholas D., Smyth, Mark J., McCarthy, James and Engwerda, Christian R. (2018). Rapid loss of group 1 innate lymphoid cells during blood stage Plasmodium infection. Clinical and Translational Immunology, 7 (1) e1003, e1003. doi: 10.1002/cti2.1003

  • Guillerey, Camille and Smyth, Mark J. (2017). Cytokine-driven role of Srebps in killer cell metabolism. Nature Immunology, 18 (11), 1183-1184. doi: 10.1038/ni.3855

  • Putz, Eva M., Guillerey, Camille, Kos, Kevin, Stannard, Kimberley, Miles, Kim, Delconte, Rebecca B, Takeda, Kazuyoshi, Nicholson, Sandra E., Huntington, Nicholas D. and Smyth, Mark J. (2017). Targeting cytokine signaling checkpoint CIS activates NK cells to protect from tumor initiation and metastasis. OncoImmunology, 6 (2) e1267892, e1267892. doi: 10.1080/2162402X.2016.1267892

  • Guillerey, Camille, Huntington, Nicholas D. and Smyth, Mark J. (2016). Targeting natural killer cells in cancer immunotherapy. Nature Immunology, 17 (9), 1025-1036. doi: 10.1038/ni.3518

  • Guillerey, Camille, Nakamura, Kyohei, Vuckovic, Slavica, Hill, Geoffrey R. and Smyth, Mark J. (2016). Immune responses in multiple myeloma: role of the natural immune surveillance and potential of immunotherapies. Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences, 73 (8), 1569-1589. doi: 10.1007/s00018-016-2135-z

  • Guillerey, Camille, de Andrade, Lucas Ferrari, Vuckovic, Slavica, Miles, Kim, Ngiow, Shin Foong, Yong, Michelle C. R., Teng, Michele W. L., Colonna, Marco, Ritchie, David S., Chesi, Martha, Bergsagel, P. Leif, Hill, Geoffrey R., Smyth, Mark J. and Martinet, Ludovic (2015). Immunosurveillance and therapy of multiple myeloma are CD226 dependent. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 125 (5), 2077-2089. doi: 10.1172/JCI77181

  • Martinet, Ludovic, FerrariDeAndrade, Lucas, Guillerey, Camille, Lee, Jason S, Liu, Jing, Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando, Hutchinson, Dana S, Kolesnik, Tatiana B, Nicholson, Sandra E, Huntington, Nicholas D and Smyth, Mark J (2015). DNAM-1 expression marks an alternative program of NK cell maturation. Cell Reports, 11 (1), 85-97. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2015.03.006

  • Guillerey, Camille, Chow, Melvyn T., Miles, Kim, Olver, Stuart, Sceneay, Jaclyn, Takeda, Kazuyoshi, Möller, Andreas and Smyth, Mark J. (2015). Toll-like receptor 3 regulates NK cell responses to cytokines and controls experimental metastasis. Oncoimmunology, 4 (9), 1-11. doi: 10.1080/2162402X.2015.1027468

Conference Publication

  • Minnie, Simone, Vuckovic, Slavica, Smith, David, Gartlan, Kate H., Watkins, Thomas S., Kuns, Rachel D., Guillerey, Camille, Chesi, Marta, Markey, Kate A., Miles, John J., Smyth, Mark J. and Hill, Geoffrey R. (2018). Syngeneic stem cell transplantation generates antigen-specific T cells that maintain myeloma-immune equilibrium. Immunology Meeting, Austin, TX, United States, 4-8 May, 2018. Rockville, MD, United States: American Association of Immunologists.

  • Guillerey, C., de Andrade, L. F., Miles, K., Vuckovic, S., Chesi, M., Bergsagel, L. P., Geoffrey, R. H., Martinet, L. and Smyth, M. J. (2016). Therapeutic potential anti-CD137 mAbs in multiple myeloma. International Congress of Immunology (ICI), Melbourne, VIC, Australia, 21-26 August, 2016. Weinheim, Germany: Wiley - V C H Verlag GmbH.

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • PROJECT TITLE: Immune regulation through bi-directional interactions between subsets of Natural Killer cells and Dendritic cells.

    ABOUT THE PROJECT

    This project will investigate interactions between two immune cell types: natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DCs). NK cells play an essential role in the early detection of infections or malignant transformation while DCs initiate and direct immune responses. Evidence for bi-directional interactions between NK cells and DCs has been provided in the early 2000s. Since then, our knowledge of NK cell and DC diversity has considerably increased. NK cells and DCs can no longer be considered as homogenous populations up to 30,000 phenotypic populations identified by mass cytometry in one individual while four main human DC subsets have been described: monocyte-derived DCs, plasmacytoid DCs and type 1 and 2 conventional DCs. Currently, we don’t know which NK subset(s) interact with which DC subset(s).

    This project aims to provide a better understanding of the crosstalk between distinct NK cell and DC subsets. Specific interactions between human cell subsets in response to different stimuli will be investigated in vitro and in vivo. The candidate will have access to state-of-the-art technology including high-parameter flow cytometry (BD Fortessa and BD FACSymphony analysers) as well as cutting-edge humanised mouse models. By addressing an important knowledge gap in the field, this project will lay the foundation for preclinical research in a wide range of pathologies including cancer, infectious diseases and autoimmune disorders.

    SCHOLARSHIP

    The candidate will be enrolled in the PhD program at the University of Queensland and will receive a UQ PhD Scholarship. Stipend is valued at $28k per annum for 3 years.

    THE TEAM

    The project will be performed in the Cancer Immunotherapies laboratory at Mater Research, located at the Translational Research Institute in Brisbane. Our laboratory is composed of 3 postdoctoral fellows, 1 research assistant and 1 PhD student. You will be directly supervised by Dr Camille Guillerey.

    We have extensive expertise in dendritic cell research and NK cell research. In addition, we have developed a unique preclinical model called humanised mice which allow the study of human immune cell interactions in vivo. Our group has an interest in cancer immunotherapies, and more particularly childhood leukaemia. We aim to provide a better understanding of immune responses to cancer and to translate it into new therapies for cancer patients.

    REQUIREMENTS

    Please note that due to current travel restrictions, we will only accept candidates (Australian and international) who are currently in Australia.

    Applicants must hold a Bachelor’s or equivalent science or medicine degree with first-class Honours, and/or a distinction in a research Masters degree in a relevant discipline (e.g. Immunology, cell biology).

    The candidate should have:

    • Excellent written and verbal English;
    • The proven ability to work both independently and as part of a team;
    • Honours I (or equivalent) and/or Masters with outstanding thesis grade or Coursework Masters with outstanding performance, particularly in research related courses.
    • Demonstrated outstanding academic achievement as evidenced by high CGPA, rank within class, academic prizes and awards
    • Strong wet lab skills (e.g. cell cultures, assays such as ELISA, ELISPOT). Experience in flow cytometry and/or with mouse handling would be advantageous
    • A candidate will perform animal work, prior experience advantageous but not essential.