Dr Renee Zahnow

ARC DECRA Senior Research Fellow

School of Social Science
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
r.zahnow@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 52167

Overview

Dr Renee Zahnow is a Lecturer in Criminology in the School of Social Science at the University of Queensland (UQ). Renee has expertise in spatial and longitudinal analyses and she has applied these skills to examine a range of social problems including crime, disorder, community social processes, resilience, substance use and community regulation. Renee’s research focuses on place-based patterns of crime and victimisation; she is particularly interested in understanding the link between the regularities of daily human mobility, social and behavioural norms and the propensity for crime and deviance. Renee holds a Visiting Research Fellow position at Liverpool John Moores University Institute for Public Health where she collaborates on research projects regarding the illicit use of steroids and performance enhancing drugs; and place-based patterns of alcohol-related harms.

Dr Zahnow has worked across a range of research projects including program evaluations and random-control trials. She has experience in working with police, ambulance and hospital data and has established working ties with industry partners and international colleagues. She has expert knowledge in areas of urban criminology, youth and deviance and substance use. Her work is published in various journals, including Criminology, Crime and Delinquency, Journal of Urban Affairs and Journal of Environmental Psychology.

Research Interests

  • Spatial Data analysis
  • Environmental Criminology
  • Urban Spaces and Sociability
  • Substance use and deviant leisure
  • Longitudinal Data analysis

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy in Criminology, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Arts (Honours), The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Arts, The University of Queensland

Publications

  • Nivette, Amy E., Zahnow, Renee, Aguilar, Raul, Ahven, Andri, Amram, Shai, Ariel, Barak, Arosemena Burbano, María José , Astolfi, Roberta, Baier, Dirk, Bark, Hyung-Min, Beijers, Joris E. H., Bergman, Marcelo, Breetzke, Gregory, Concha-Eastman, I. Alberto, Curtis-Ham, Sophie, Davenport, Ryan, Díaz, Carlos, Fleitas, Diego, Gerell, Manne, Jang, Kwang-Ho, Kääriäinen, Juha, Lappi-Seppälä, Tapio, Lim, Woon-Sik, Revilla, Rosa Loureiro, Mazerolle, Lorraine, Meško, Gorazd, Pereda, Noemí, Peres, Maria F. T., Poblete-Cazenave, Rubén ... Eisner, Manuel P. (2021). A global analysis of the impact of COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions on crime. Nature Human Behaviour, 1-12. doi: 10.1038/s41562-021-01139-z

  • Taylor, Nicholas, Livingston, Michael, Coomber, Kerri, Mayshak, Richelle, Zahnow, Renee, Ferris, Jason, Chikritzhs, Tanya and Miller, Peter (2021). The combined impact of higher-risk on-license venue outlet density and trading hours on serious assaults in night-time entertainment precincts. Drug and Alcohol Dependence, 223 108720, 108720. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2021.108720

  • Zahnow, Renee, Corcoran, Jonathan, Kimpton, Anthony and Wickes, Rebecca (2021). Neighbourhood places, collective efficacy and crime: a longitudinal perspective. Urban Studies. doi: 10.1177/00420980211008820

View all Publications

Grants

View all Grants

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Project description: Public spaces play a vital role in contemporary cities. Beyond their primary function, public spaces such as parks, transport stations and shops, provide opportunities for social interaction, community attachment and a sense of belonging to develop (Francis et al 2012). Public spaces can also provide opportunities for crime. Opportunities for crime arise as a product of situational factors that bring a motivated offender and suitable target together in time and space, in the absence of a guardian (Cohen & Felson 1979). Everyday users of public spaces are frequently present when formal guardians, like police, are absent. These everyday users provide some level of guardianship through their presence alone; merely because they are visible to would-be offenders. More effective guardianship is provided by everyday users of public spaces who act to deter or respond to a crime event by consciously monitoring, proactively preventing and responding to behaviours (Hollis-Peel et al 2011). Active guardians are essential for safe public spaces. In the residential neighbourhood we know that familiarity with place and collective identity with neighbours motivates a sense of responsibility for the shared territory and enhances active guardianship (Newman 1972; Reynald 2011).

    Young people frequent public spaces during the course of their everyday lives and may experience public spaces differently than other users. We have a limited understanding of the extent to which young people develop familiarity with public spaces they regularly visit and how this may influence their actions, perceptions and potential guardianship in public spaces. The aim of this PhD would be to address this research gap.

    Other requirements:

    • Applications will be judged on a competitive basis taking into account the applicant's previous academic record, publication record, honours and awards, and employment history.
    • A working knowledge of environmental criminology, neighbourhood effects and/or crime and deviance literature would be of benefit to someone working on this project.
    • The applicant will demonstrate academic achievement in the field(s) of criminology, psychology or sociology and the potential for scholastic success.
    • A background or knowledge of research methodologies is highly desirable.
    • The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 4, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Project description: Public spaces play a vital role in contemporary cities. Beyond their primary function, public spaces such as parks, transport stations and shops, provide opportunities for social interaction, community attachment and a sense of belonging to develop (Francis et al 2012). Public spaces can also provide opportunities for crime. Opportunities for crime arise as a product of situational factors that bring a motivated offender and suitable target together in time and space, in the absence of a guardian (Cohen & Felson 1979). Everyday users of public spaces are frequently present when formal guardians, like police, are absent. These everyday users provide some level of guardianship through their presence alone; merely because they are visible to would-be offenders. More effective guardianship is provided by everyday users of public spaces who act to deter or respond to a crime event by consciously monitoring, proactively preventing and responding to behaviours (Hollis-Peel et al 2011). Active guardians are essential for safe public spaces. In the residential neighbourhood we know that familiarity with place and collective identity with neighbours motivates a sense of responsibility for the shared territory and enhances active guardianship (Newman 1972; Reynald 2011).

    Young people frequent public spaces during the course of their everyday lives and may experience public spaces differently than other users. We have a limited understanding of the extent to which young people develop familiarity with public spaces they regularly visit and how this may influence their actions, perceptions and potential guardianship in public spaces. The aim of this PhD would be to address this research gap.

    Other requirements:

    • Applications will be judged on a competitive basis taking into account the applicant's previous academic record, publication record, honours and awards, and employment history.
    • A working knowledge of environmental criminology, neighbourhood effects and/or crime and deviance literature would be of benefit to someone working on this project.
    • The applicant will demonstrate academic achievement in the field(s) of criminology, psychology or sociology and the potential for scholastic success.
    • A background or knowledge of research methodologies is highly desirable.
    • The successful candidate must commence by Research Quarter 4, 2021. You should apply at least 3 months prior to the research quarter commencement date. International applicants may need to apply much earlier for visa reasons.