Dr Aaron Herndon

Snr Lecturer- Small Animal Medicine

School of Veterinary Science
Faculty of Science

Overview

Research Interests

  • Feline Diabetes Mellitus
    My graduate degree work was in the field of feline diabetes and novel therapies to managing this desease.
  • Assessment in Higher Education
    Specifically, assessment methodologies in health education. We have several projects investigating good assessment practice in technical skills, clinical reasoning, and clinical knowledge. Currently producing an assessment map that will be used to inform a "strategic assessment plan" for the curriculum.
  • Curriculum Mapping and Design
    Investigating curriculum and assessment mapping and how to visualise these maps in a way most accessible to the various user groups.
  • Cancer biomarkers
    Study of serum and tissue biomarkers for canine cancers - specifically prostate and lymphoma.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Texas Agricultural & Mechanical University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Veterinary Clinical Sci

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • This project aims to produce a novel, multi-modal assessment to use as the capstone assessment for our BVSc curriculum. Graduates of the BVSc are considered "practice ready" for licensure in Australia. In order to ensure that students have met the program learning objectives and can demonstrate the requisite technical skills, clinical skills, and knowledge base, we are designing an examination that borrows on the concepts of the Objective Structured Clinica Exam (OSCE), Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS), short case, written theory, and VIVA voce formats.

    Students must have a keen interest in medical education, curriculum design, assessment pedagogy, and skills assessment. This project is designed around assessment of the BVSc, but the outcomes are easily applicable to many other disciples within the health sciences and beyond.

  • Medical training has evolved over recent decades to include an increased reliance on models and simulation for teaching and learning. The reasons for this are multifacited, but include movement away from live-patient/animal practice, decreased learning stress, and ability to easily revise material independent of patient load. There is a robust body of literature describing the use of models for training and learning. However, the literature describing the use of models for assessment of technical skills is lean at best.

    This project aims to evaluate and validate certain models for both the learning and assessment of techinical skills. Our hypothesis is that assessment of some technical skills on models will be equivalent to that of assessing the skills on a live patient. We expect that the benefits on student stress, additional opportunities for assessment, and decreased animal use will result in overall greater satisfaction of student learning and better attainment of program learning objectives.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • This project aims to produce a novel, multi-modal assessment to use as the capstone assessment for our BVSc curriculum. Graduates of the BVSc are considered "practice ready" for licensure in Australia. In order to ensure that students have met the program learning objectives and can demonstrate the requisite technical skills, clinical skills, and knowledge base, we are designing an examination that borrows on the concepts of the Objective Structured Clinica Exam (OSCE), Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS), short case, written theory, and VIVA voce formats.

    Students must have a keen interest in medical education, curriculum design, assessment pedagogy, and skills assessment. This project is designed around assessment of the BVSc, but the outcomes are easily applicable to many other disciples within the health sciences and beyond.

  • Medical training has evolved over recent decades to include an increased reliance on models and simulation for teaching and learning. The reasons for this are multifacited, but include movement away from live-patient/animal practice, decreased learning stress, and ability to easily revise material independent of patient load. There is a robust body of literature describing the use of models for training and learning. However, the literature describing the use of models for assessment of technical skills is lean at best.

    This project aims to evaluate and validate certain models for both the learning and assessment of techinical skills. Our hypothesis is that assessment of some technical skills on models will be equivalent to that of assessing the skills on a live patient. We expect that the benefits on student stress, additional opportunities for assessment, and decreased animal use will result in overall greater satisfaction of student learning and better attainment of program learning objectives.