Professor Jenny Seddon

Assoc Dean(Research)& Dep Exec Dean

Faculty of Science

Professor

School of Veterinary Science
Faculty of Science
j.seddon1@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 60586

Overview

Research Interests

  • Summary
    I am a veterinarian and a molecular geneticist. I have established an international reputation in using genetic tools to address ecological questions in support of the conservation of wildlife. I am also interested in disease ecology and using molecular tools to understand the spread of disease and vectors at the urban-rural interface. I am passionate about quality student-centred veterinary education. I teach genetics and genomics and have introduced innovative teaching activities and authentic assessment. I led an OIE (World Organisation for Animal Health) Veterinary Education Twinning Project that is improving veterinary education at a vet school in Viet Nam, empowering their staff and having flow-on impact in the region. I have wide experience in governance and management, with experience at a School, Faculty and University level, including appointments as Deputy Head of School (2014-current) and Acting Head of School (2017).
  • Conservation Genetics
    My research focuses on the application of genetics and genomics to ecological questions. This includes the distribution of genetic variation across landscapes, the impact of current and historical barriers to gene flow and estimating genetic relatedness and its impact on social systems. Research projects have been based mainly on mammals, including koalas, kangaroos, dugongs, dolphins, giraffe and mongooses, but also on other species, such as the cattle tick.

Qualifications

  • Graduate Certificate in Education, The University of Queensland
  • Doctor of Philosophy, Southern Cross University
  • Master of Science, Southern Cross University
  • Bachelor of Veterinary Science, The University of Sydney

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • We invite applications for an exciting PhD project developing point of care microbiome therapy in koalas during antimicrobial treatment under the supervision of Prof Jenny Seddon, together with Dr Michaela Blyton, Dr Deirdre Mikkelsen A/Prof Joerg Hennig and colleagues. The research is funded by the Morris Animal Foundation and will be undertaken in collaboration with Australian Zoo Wildlife Hospital and Currumbin Wildlife Hospital.

    The project:

    Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) are an iconic Australian marsupial that are now facing population declines in the majority of its range. Chlamydial infections, primarily Chlamydia pecorum, are common in koalas, with overt disease resulting in blindness, cystitis and infertility. Infection and disease rates can be high and are a leading cause of koala admissions to wildlife hospitals. Wildlife hospitals report gut dysfunction in koalas in association with antimicrobial treatment, with many koalas not surviving through treatment. This project will involve clinical trials of microbiome manipulation through oral faecal inoculations and developing predictive tools to be implemented at a practical level in wildlife hospitals. The project has the overall objective of reducing morbidity and mortality associated with gut dysfunction in koalas undergoing antimicrobial therapy.

    The student:

    We are seeking a motivated PhD student with a background in genetic or genomic analysis and an interest in wildlife conservation. The project will include analysis of next generation sequences, undertaking real time and isothermal PCRs, and involvement with clinical trials in koalas. An interest in developing diagnostic tests and/or microbiology is desirable. The successful PhD applicant will have good interpersonal and communication skills and be willing to travel between campuses and wildlife hospitals.

    How to apply:

    Applicants must be competitive for an Australian Government Research Training Program scholarship at The University of Queensland. Because of border closures associated with the pandemic, applicants must be in Australia at the time of application. To express interest in applying for this project, please send a cover letter and CV (including your academic transcript) to j.seddon1@uq.edu.au by 15th August 2021.

    More information:

    Please contact Jenny (j.seddon1@uq.edu.au) to discuss the project. For information regarding PhD admissions at the University of Queensland, please go to https://future-students.uq.edu.au/admissions/higher-degree-research and here for scholarship information.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • We invite applications for an exciting PhD project developing point of care microbiome therapy in koalas during antimicrobial treatment under the supervision of Prof Jenny Seddon, together with Dr Michaela Blyton, Dr Deirdre Mikkelsen A/Prof Joerg Hennig and colleagues. The research is funded by the Morris Animal Foundation and will be undertaken in collaboration with Australian Zoo Wildlife Hospital and Currumbin Wildlife Hospital.

    The project:

    Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) are an iconic Australian marsupial that are now facing population declines in the majority of its range. Chlamydial infections, primarily Chlamydia pecorum, are common in koalas, with overt disease resulting in blindness, cystitis and infertility. Infection and disease rates can be high and are a leading cause of koala admissions to wildlife hospitals. Wildlife hospitals report gut dysfunction in koalas in association with antimicrobial treatment, with many koalas not surviving through treatment. This project will involve clinical trials of microbiome manipulation through oral faecal inoculations and developing predictive tools to be implemented at a practical level in wildlife hospitals. The project has the overall objective of reducing morbidity and mortality associated with gut dysfunction in koalas undergoing antimicrobial therapy.

    The student:

    We are seeking a motivated PhD student with a background in genetic or genomic analysis and an interest in wildlife conservation. The project will include analysis of next generation sequences, undertaking real time and isothermal PCRs, and involvement with clinical trials in koalas. An interest in developing diagnostic tests and/or microbiology is desirable. The successful PhD applicant will have good interpersonal and communication skills and be willing to travel between campuses and wildlife hospitals.

    How to apply:

    Applicants must be competitive for an Australian Government Research Training Program scholarship at The University of Queensland. Because of border closures associated with the pandemic, applicants must be in Australia at the time of application. To express interest in applying for this project, please send a cover letter and CV (including your academic transcript) to j.seddon1@uq.edu.au by 15th August 2021.

    More information:

    Please contact Jenny (j.seddon1@uq.edu.au) to discuss the project. For information regarding PhD admissions at the University of Queensland, please go to https://future-students.uq.edu.au/admissions/higher-degree-research and here for scholarship information.