Dr Francois-Rene Bertin

Equine Internal Medicine Specialist

School of Veterinary Science
Faculty of Science
f.bertin@uq.edu.au
+61 7 54601 799

Overview

François-René Bertin, DVM, MS, PhD, dipl.ACVIM (LAIM)

Senior Lecturer in Equine Internal Medicine with expertise in equine endocrinology

François-René graduated with a DVM from the National Veterinary School of Nantes (France). After completing an internship in equine medicine and surgery at the National Veterinary School of Alfort (France), François-René trained in Equine Internal Medicine at the Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine (USA) and became a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM).

During his residency, François-René developed an expertise in equine endocrinology and authored several research articles on insulin dysregulation in horses. He then completed a PhD in physiology at McGill University (Canada), investigating the links between inflammation and coagulation. After his PhD, François-René worked as an Equine Internal Medicine specialist at the Equine Hospital of The University of Montreal (Canada) before joining The University of Queensland as a Senior Lecturer in Equine Internal Medicine.

François-René enjoys all aspects of internal medicine and has a specific interest for equine metabolism and endocrinology.

Research Interests

  • Equine endocrinology
  • Insulin dysregulation
  • Metabolic triggers for laminitis
  • Inflammation and endocrine disorders

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, McGill University
  • Diplomate of the ACVIM, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
  • Residency in Large Animal Medicine, Purdue University
  • Master of Science, Purdue University
  • Doctor of Veterinary Medicine, University of Nantes

Publications

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Supervision

  • Doctor Veterinary Clinical Sci

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Insulin dysregulation is the hallmark of equine metabolic syndrome and has received attention because of its direct association with laminitis. In the absence of an adequate treatment for laminitis, our research focuses on the mechanisms leading to laminitis as well as on the early detection of individuals at risk of developing laminitis.

  • The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis is a major regulator of homeostasis. With sickness or with age, this axis can be dysregulated leading to critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency or to pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) respectively. The latter is a common condition of older horses that can result in laminitis and our research focuses on the detection and management of horses developping PPID.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book Chapter

  • Bertin, François-René (2020). Neuroaxonal dystrophy/equine degenerative myeloencephalopathy. In Jean-Pierre Lavoie (Ed.), Blackwell's five-minute veterinary consult: equine 3rd ed. (pp. 509-510) Hoboken, NJ, United States: John Wiley and Sons.

  • Bertin, F. R., Tamzali, Y. and Lussot-Kervern, I. (2014). Les medicaments anti-tumoraux. In J. Bardies (Ed.), Guide de Thérapeutique équine (pp. 138-148) Rueil-Malmaison, France: Point Vétérinaire.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Insulin dysregulation is the hallmark of equine metabolic syndrome and has received attention because of its direct association with laminitis. In the absence of an adequate treatment for laminitis, our research focuses on the mechanisms leading to laminitis as well as on the early detection of individuals at risk of developing laminitis.

  • The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis is a major regulator of homeostasis. With sickness or with age, this axis can be dysregulated leading to critical illness-related corticosteroid insufficiency or to pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) respectively. The latter is a common condition of older horses that can result in laminitis and our research focuses on the detection and management of horses developping PPID.