Dr Jeanne Marshall

Conjoint Research Fellow

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences

Overview

Jeanne is a speech pathologist with expertise in paediatric feeding and swallowing. She is currently employed in a conjoint role between Children's Health Queensland Hospital and Health Service and The University of Queensland. Jeanne’s research interests include paediatric feeding disorders and dysphagia, telepractice, education, and simulation. Jeanne also has a passion for research translation and building research capacity in the health workforce.

Research Interests

  • Paediatric feeding disorders and dysphagia
  • Infant feeding
  • Telehealth
  • Simulation and workforce education

Research Impacts

Paediatric feeding disorders and dysphagia can have a significant impact on short- and long-term health outcomes for children, as well as on the parent-child relationship. Jeanne's research in this area aims to improve the health trajectory for children with these difficulties, from appropriate identification and diagnosis of PFD's, to management and ultimately prevention.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland

Publications

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Supervision

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Available Projects

  • Tracheostomy insertion is becoming increasingly common in paediatrics, as medical advancement supports improved survival of children with complex medical conditions. Unfortunately, tracheostomy placement inhibits the ability to voice, which can have an impact on children’s communication development, particularly when tracheostomy placement occurs during the critical period for language acquisition and use typically persists beyond two years of age.

    A one-way speaking valve may be placed on a patient to support the production of voice. There is some documented evidence in the adult population regarding the benefits of speaking valve use for swallowing and communication, but little high-quality evidence in paediatrics regarding developmental and swallowing outcomes to guide clinicians in care.

    This project proposes retrospective and prospective data collection regarding timing of and criteria for speaking valve introduction, information regarding tolerance criteria, and any documented benefits to swallowing, secretion management and communication. The overall aim would be to establish an evidence-based clinical guideline regarding introduction and tolerance criteria for speaking valve use, and to provide a protocol regarding prospective documentation of outcomes regarding swallowing and communication. Implementation of these tools will support improvements in patient care and lay the foundation for further research in this area.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Master Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Tracheostomy insertion is becoming increasingly common in paediatrics, as medical advancement supports improved survival of children with complex medical conditions. Unfortunately, tracheostomy placement inhibits the ability to voice, which can have an impact on children’s communication development, particularly when tracheostomy placement occurs during the critical period for language acquisition and use typically persists beyond two years of age.

    A one-way speaking valve may be placed on a patient to support the production of voice. There is some documented evidence in the adult population regarding the benefits of speaking valve use for swallowing and communication, but little high-quality evidence in paediatrics regarding developmental and swallowing outcomes to guide clinicians in care.

    This project proposes retrospective and prospective data collection regarding timing of and criteria for speaking valve introduction, information regarding tolerance criteria, and any documented benefits to swallowing, secretion management and communication. The overall aim would be to establish an evidence-based clinical guideline regarding introduction and tolerance criteria for speaking valve use, and to provide a protocol regarding prospective documentation of outcomes regarding swallowing and communication. Implementation of these tools will support improvements in patient care and lay the foundation for further research in this area.