Dr Christy Noble

Clinical Learning & Assessment Lead

Academy for Medical Education
Faculty of Medicine

Affiliate Senior Lecturer

School of Pharmacy
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
c.noble2@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 55481

Overview

Christy is registered pharmacist with more than 17 years’ experience as a clinical educator and educational researcher, in both academic and clinical settings. Her clinical education experiences have been underpinned by my formal postgraduate qualifications, Master of Education (Clinical Education) and Doctor of Philosophy (Pharmacy Education). Her Doctor of Philosophy (University of Queensland, 2014) examined pharmacy curriculum and its influence on professional identity formation. This research has served as a platform for an ongoing research program in workplace learning in medical and health professional education, which has been recognised internationally.

Research Interests

  • Workplace learning
  • Qualitative research methods
  • Professional identity formation
  • Clinical supervision
  • Feedback
  • Feedback literacy
  • Assessment literacy
  • Clinical assessments

Research Impacts

My research is mainly situated in the field of health professions education with a particular interest in workplace and interprofessional learning. My medical and health professions education research contributions illuminate learning opportunities that exist in practice i.e. clinical settings and provide insights on how workplace learning can be augmented.

The key impacts of my research include:

  1. Development and implementation of innovative feedback literacy programs to improve healthcare students and junior doctors engagement in workplace feedback. Our findings have demonstrated that health care students are more actively engaged in workplace feedback thus generating improved learning outcomes.
  2. Implementation and evaluation of interprofessional co-supervision model of pharmacists supervising junior doctors to improve prescribing practices. The program has demonstrated, through comprehensive reflective activities, improve pharmacists’ interprofessional capability and ability to facilitate junior doctor prescribing learning. Our findings suggest that pharmacist and junior doctor co-working improved as a result of this program.
  3. Identification of key features of productive learning environments for health care professionals (including medical practitioners and pharmacists).

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Master of Education, University of Leeds
  • Graduate Certificate in Clinical Pharmacy, The University of Queensland
  • Bachelor of Phamacy, The University of Queensland

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Effective interprofessional feedback in clinical practice enhances health care professionals’ performance and, ultimately, improves patient outcomes. However, enacting effective feedback in busy and complex clinical settings is challenging. This project aims to better understand the relational and socio-cultural characteristics of interprofessional feedback. Specifically, we ask, how are in situ interprofessional feedback (i.e., between practitioners from different professions) processes enacted in clinical settings. Moreover, using an innovative methodology – video-reflexive ethnography (VRE) – where ordinary daily feedback exchanges will be filmed and reflected on by health care professionals – this project will also contribute to enriching feedback experiences of health care professionals s. You will work with experienced supervisors in medical education, interprofessional learning and social sciences. Successful outcomes of this project will be peer-reviewed publications in high-impact journals and the chance to contribute to enhancing healthcare professional experiences of feedback and ultimately, enhance both medical education and clinical practice.

  • Effective feedback by supervisors and peers is necessary for medical practitioners to improve their practice. Despite much evidence describing best feedback practices, variation in enactments of feedback in clinical settings results in missed opportunities for performance improvement. Tailored methods of implementing feedback evidence into practice, informed by better understanding of the barriers and enablers to effective feedback, may reduce this variation and improve practice. Implementation science is a relatively new approach which provides tools for enhancing uptake of evidence into practice. It has used both within clinical practice and in school-based education programs. However, there are few published examples of its application in clinical education. This project will apply implementation science tools and methods to enhance feedback practices in clinical settings. Using mixed methods, the PhD candidate will:

    • Conduct a systematic literature review of feedback practices in medical education
    • Determine barriers and facilitators to effective feedback practices in the workplace
    • Develop tailored implementation strategies to enhance feedback practices
    • Evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the implementation strategies.

    With experienced supervisors in medical education and implementation science, this project will result in high-quality research outputs including publications and conference presentations. It will provide the candidate with opportunities to improve the experience of giving and receiving feedback, and enhance both medical education and clinical practice.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Molloy, Elizabeth, Noble, Christy and Ajjawi, Rola (2019). Attending to emotion in feedback. The Impact of Feedback in Higher Education. (pp. 83-105) edited by Michael Henderson, Rola Ajjawi, David Boud and Elizabeth Molloy. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan. doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-25112-3_6

  • Noble, Christy, Sly, Christine, Collier, Leigh, Armit, Lyn, Hilder, Joanne and Molloy, Elizabeth (2019). Enhancing feedback literacy in the workplace: A learner-centred approach. Augmenting Health and Social Care Students’ Clinical Learning Experiences Outcomes and Processes. (pp. 283-306) edited by Stephen Billett, Jennifer Newton, Gary Rogers and Christy Noble. Wiesbaden, Germany: Springer Nature. doi: 10.1007/978-3-030-05560-8_13

  • Stephen Billett, Christy Noble and Linda Sweet (2018). Pedagogically-rich activities in hospital work: Handovers, ward rounds and team meetings. A practical guide for learning and teaching in a clinical context. (pp. 207-220) edited by Clare Delany and Elizabeth Molloy. Chatswood, NSW, Australia: Elsevier.

  • Billett, Stephen and Noble, Christy (2017). Individuals' mediation of learning professional practice: co-working and learning to prescribe. Agency at work: an agentic perspective on professional learning and development. (pp. 205-228) edited by Michael Goller and Susanna Paloniemi. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer.

  • Billett, Stephen and Noble, Christy (2017). Individuals’ mediation of learning professional practice: co-working and learning to prescribe. Agency at work: an agentic perspective on professional learning and development. (pp. 205-227) edited by Michael Goller and Susanna Paloniemi. Cham, Switzerland: Springer Nature. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-60943-0_11

  • Noble, Christy and Billett, Stephen (2017). Transitioning to effective medical practice: junior doctors' learning through co-working with pharmacists. Interactional competences in institutional settings: from school to the workplace. (pp. 253-279) Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-46867-9_10

  • Noble, Christy and Billett, Stephen (2016). Sustaining and transforming the practice of communities: developing professionals' working practices. Supporting learning across working life: models, processes and practices. (pp. 147-167) edited by Stephen Billett, Darryl Dymock and Sarojni Choy. Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-29019-5_8

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Effective interprofessional feedback in clinical practice enhances health care professionals’ performance and, ultimately, improves patient outcomes. However, enacting effective feedback in busy and complex clinical settings is challenging. This project aims to better understand the relational and socio-cultural characteristics of interprofessional feedback. Specifically, we ask, how are in situ interprofessional feedback (i.e., between practitioners from different professions) processes enacted in clinical settings. Moreover, using an innovative methodology – video-reflexive ethnography (VRE) – where ordinary daily feedback exchanges will be filmed and reflected on by health care professionals – this project will also contribute to enriching feedback experiences of health care professionals s. You will work with experienced supervisors in medical education, interprofessional learning and social sciences. Successful outcomes of this project will be peer-reviewed publications in high-impact journals and the chance to contribute to enhancing healthcare professional experiences of feedback and ultimately, enhance both medical education and clinical practice.

  • Effective feedback by supervisors and peers is necessary for medical practitioners to improve their practice. Despite much evidence describing best feedback practices, variation in enactments of feedback in clinical settings results in missed opportunities for performance improvement. Tailored methods of implementing feedback evidence into practice, informed by better understanding of the barriers and enablers to effective feedback, may reduce this variation and improve practice. Implementation science is a relatively new approach which provides tools for enhancing uptake of evidence into practice. It has used both within clinical practice and in school-based education programs. However, there are few published examples of its application in clinical education. This project will apply implementation science tools and methods to enhance feedback practices in clinical settings. Using mixed methods, the PhD candidate will:

    • Conduct a systematic literature review of feedback practices in medical education
    • Determine barriers and facilitators to effective feedback practices in the workplace
    • Develop tailored implementation strategies to enhance feedback practices
    • Evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of the implementation strategies.

    With experienced supervisors in medical education and implementation science, this project will result in high-quality research outputs including publications and conference presentations. It will provide the candidate with opportunities to improve the experience of giving and receiving feedback, and enhance both medical education and clinical practice.