Associate Professor Katharina Ronacher

Honorary Associate Professor

Mater Research Institute-UQ
Faculty of Medicine

Overview

Katharina Ronacher obtained an MSc degree from the University of Vienna (Austria), followed by a PhD degree from the University of Cape Town (South Africa). After her post-doctoral training she worked together with Gerhard Walzl on biomarkers for TB treatment response and started her own research group at the University of Stellenbosch (South Africa), where she held a position for over ten years.

She now heads the Infection, Immunity and Metabolism group at the Mater Research Institute – University of Queensland.

Katharina’s research investigates the underlying immunological mechanisms of the increased risk of tuberculosis in patients with type 2 diabetes for which she received a 5 year NIH R01 grant. She continues to hold an appointment as Extraordinary Associate Professor at Stellenbosch University.

Publications

  • Ugarte-Gil, Cesar, Alisjahbana, Bachti, Ronacher, Katharina, Riza, Anca Lelia, Koesoemadinata, Raspati C., Malherbe, Stephanus T., Cioboata, Ramona, Llontop, Juan Carlos, Kleynhans, Leanie, Lopez, Sonia, Santoso, Prayudi, Marius, Ciontea, Villaizan, Katerine, Ruslami, Rovina, Walzl, Gerhard, Panduru, Nicolae Mircea, Dockrell, Hazel M., Hill, Philip C., Mc Allister, Susan, Pearson, Fiona, Moore, David A. J, Critchley, Julia A., van Crevel, Reinout and TANDEM Consortium (2019) Diabetes mellitus among pulmonary tuberculosis patients from four TB-endemic countries: the TANDEM study. Clinical Infectious Diseases, . doi:10.1093/cid/ciz284

  • Huangfu, P., Laurence, Y. V., Alisjahbana, B., Ugarte-Gil, C., Riza, A-L., Walzl, G., Ruslami, R., Moore, D. A. J., Ioana, M.., McAllister, S., Ronacher, K., Koesoemadinata, R. C., Grint, D., Kerry, S., Coronel, J., Malherbe, S. T., Griffiths, U., Dockrell, H. M., Hill, P. C., van Crevel, R., Pearson, F. and Critchley, J. A. (2019) Point of care HbA1c level for diabetes mellitus management and its accuracy among tuberculosis patients: a study in four countries. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 23 3: 283-292. doi:10.5588/ijtld.18.0359

  • Roy Chowdhury, Roshni, Vallania, Francesco, Yang, Qianting, Lopez Angel, Cesar Joel, Darboe, Fatoumatta, Penn-Nicholson, Adam, Rozot, Virginie, Nemes, Elisa, Malherbe, Stephanus T., Ronacher, Katharina, Walzl, Gerhard, Hanekom, Willem, Davis, Mark M., Winter, Jill, Chen, Xinchun, Scriba, Thomas J., Khatri, Purvesh and Chien, Yueh-hsiu (2018) Erratum to: A multi-cohort study of the immune factors associated with M. tuberculosis infection outcomes (Nature, (2018), 560, 7720, (644-648), 10.1038/s41586-018-0439-x). Nature, 564 7734: E5-E5. doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0635-8

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Available Projects

  • Intracellular pathogens are difficutl to eradicate as they hide within host cells to evade the host's immune system. One of these pathogens is Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Despite effective anti-biotic therapy the majority of "cured" tuberculosis patients continue to have active lung lesions containing live mycobacteria beyond treatment completion. For this reason we have been unable to eradicate this ancient disease, which has been with human kind for over 9000 years. Sub-optimal, non-sterilizing treatment combined with the concurrent rise in antibiotic resistance thus necessitates innovative treatment strategies.

    We have identified several promising host-targets and have PhD positions available on this topic in our laboratory. To find out more please contact the Head of the Infection, Immunity and Metabolism Group Katharina Ronacher email: katharina.ronacher@mater.uq.edu.au

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Ronacher, Katharina, Djoba-Siawaya, Joel Fleury and Walzl, Gerhard (2011). Cytokines in pulmonary tuberculosis. In Cytokines (pp. 123-138) : CRC Press.

  • Ronacher, Katharina , Djoba-Siawaya, Joel Fleury and Walzl, Gerhard (2011). Cytokines in pulmonary tuberculosis. In Victor R. Preedy and Ross Hunter (Ed.), Cytokines (pp. 123-137) Boca Raton, Florida, United States: CRC Press.

Journal Article

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Intracellular pathogens are difficutl to eradicate as they hide within host cells to evade the host's immune system. One of these pathogens is Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Despite effective anti-biotic therapy the majority of "cured" tuberculosis patients continue to have active lung lesions containing live mycobacteria beyond treatment completion. For this reason we have been unable to eradicate this ancient disease, which has been with human kind for over 9000 years. Sub-optimal, non-sterilizing treatment combined with the concurrent rise in antibiotic resistance thus necessitates innovative treatment strategies.

    We have identified several promising host-targets and have PhD positions available on this topic in our laboratory. To find out more please contact the Head of the Infection, Immunity and Metabolism Group Katharina Ronacher email: katharina.ronacher@mater.uq.edu.au