Associate Professor Coral Gartner

Associate Professor

School of Public Health
Faculty of Medicine
c.gartner@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 65478

Overview

Associate Professor Gartner’s main research interest is in evaluating strategies to reduce the harm from tobacco use. She leads the Nicotine and Tobacco Regulatory Science Research Group.

Coral is also the program convenor for the Master of Environmental Health Sciences program. She has a background in environmental health and environmental epidemiology. Her previous research has included control of the dengue fever vector, Aedes aegypti and environmental risk factors for Parkinson’s disease. Her current primary research field is in the area of tobacco control policy and interventions to reduce tobacco-related harms. Her research interests include tobacco harm reduction and monitoring community illicit drug use via wastewater analysis. Her research methods includes cohort studies, mixed method studies, epidemiological modelling and clinical trials.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Applied Science - Environmental Health, Queensland University of Technology
  • Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours), Queensland University of Technology

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death globally, killing over 7 million people per year. In Australia, smoking causes 20,933 deaths per year, accounting for nearly 1 in 7 deaths and 9% of disease burden. Discussion is growing about how to end the cigarette epidemic, meaning reducing smoking prevalence to a level that is no longer a major public health issue. Once seen as ‘unthinkable’, this goal is now part of mainstream tobacco control research and government health policy. A range of endgame strategies have been proposed; some have been implemented or are under serious consideration in other countries. The NHMRC-funded Centre of Research Excellence on Achieving the Tobacco Endgame (CREATE) will develop the evidence base for and outline a roadmap for Australia to end smoking in Australia. CREATE has four earmarked scholarships available with a possible additional $5,000 per annum top up scholarship available for exceptional canddiates.

    Multiple PhD projects are available covering the topics listed below.

    1. Estimating the impact of proposed endgame strategies on smoking prevalence, particularly for Indigenous peoples, and other priority groups

    2. Identifying the legal barriers and enablers, likely legal challenges and potential defences, of tobacco endgame strategies

    3. Determining policy maker and public support, including among Indigenous peoples, and other priority groups, for tobacco endgame strategies

    4. Optimising public communications about tobacco endgame strategies to inform and generate discussion

    5. Identifying potential unintended impacts and developing appropriate mitigation strategies (including optimising smoking cessation for priority groups)

    Preferred educational background: Undergraduate Class I or IIA honours or Masters degree in Public Health, Health Sciences, Chemistry, Behavioural Sciences, Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Environmental Health, Regulatory Science, Health Law, Health Policy, Communications, Psychology or a related field. Knowledge and experience in health policy or product regulation would be highly valued.

    If you are interested in one of these topics, please contact Associate Professor Gartner to discuss. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates are especially encouraged to apply.

    Please note that only domestic and onshore international students (i.e. you are already physically in Australia) are eligible to apply for these scholarships.

  • Smoking prevalence in the general Australian population is among the lowest of any high income country. However, it still remains a highly prevalent source of exposure to toxic chemical exposure in the Australian population. In most countries, including Australia, the design and construction of tobacco cigarettes remains relatively unregulated.

    Article 9 of the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control requires parties to the treaty to regulate the contents and emissions of tobacco products. Hence, there have been increasing moves internationally to develop product standards for cigarettes with the aims of reducing the attractiveness and palatability of cigarettes or reducing exposure to harmful and potentially harmful chemicals in tobacco smoke. There has also been a growing interest in banning filters from cigarettes due to their environmental impact. New nicotine products, such as e-cigarettes and other vaporisers and heated tobacco products are creating further new challenges for regulators in determining appropriate product standards. This PhD will develop the evidence base for development of effective regulation of nicotine and tobacco products to assist with the implementation of Article 9 of the WHO FCTC.

    Preferred educational background: Undergraduate Class I or IIA honours or Masters degree in Public Health, Health Sciences, Chemistry, Behavioural Sciences, Biostatistics, Environmental Health, Regulatory Science, Health Law, Health Policy or a related field. Knowledge and experience in health policy or product regulation would be highly valued.

    Please note that only domestic and onshore international students (i.e. you are already physically in Australia) are currently eligible to apply for this project.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book Chapter

  • Gartner, Coral (2019). One does not simply sell e-cigarettes in Australia: an overview of Australian e-cigarette regulations. The Regulation of E-cigarettes. (pp. 249-278) Cheltenham, United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing. doi: 10.4337/9781788970464.00021

  • Gartner, Coral and Bromberg, Marilyn (2019). One does not simply sell e-cigarettes in Australia: an overview of Australian e-cigarette regulations. The regulation of e-cigarettes: international, European and national challenges. (pp. 249-279) edited by Lukasz Gruszczynski. Cheltenham, United Kingdom: Edward Elgar Publishing.

  • Hall, W., Gartner, C. and Vittiglia, A. (2018). Smokers’ attitudes to and beliefs about addiction. Tobacco in Australia: Facts and issues. (pp. 6.14-6.14) edited by Scollo, M. and Winstanley, M.. Melbourne, VIC Australia: Cancer Council Victoria.

  • Degenhardt, Louisa, Gartner, Coral and Hall, Wayne D. (2015). The epidemiology of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use and their contribution to the burden of disease. Addiction medicine: principles and practice. (pp. 8-21) edited by Paul Haber, Carolyn Day and Michael Farrell. Sydney, Australia: IP Communications.

  • Gartner, Coral E. and Partridge, Brad (2012). Addiction neuroscience and tobacco control. Addiction neuroethics: The ethics of addiction neuroscience research and treatment. (pp. 75-93) edited by Adrian Carter, Wayne Hall and Judy Illes. New York, NY, United States: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-385973-0.00004-1

  • Gartner, Coral (2012). Smokeless tobacco and harm reduction. Tobacco in Australia: facts and issues. (pp. 39-41) Melbourne, Australia: Cancer Council Victoria.

  • Hall, Wayne D., Gartner, Coral E., Mathews, Rebecca and Munafo, Marcus (2012). Technical, ethical and social issues in the bioprediction of addiction liability and treatment response. Addiction neuroethics: the ethics of addiction neuroscience research and treatment. (pp. 115-135) edited by Adrian Carter, Wayne Hall and Judy Illes. New York, NY, United States: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-385973-0.00006-5

  • Gartner, Coral and Hall, Wayne (2011). Challenges in reducing the disease burden of tobacco smoking. Substance abuse disorders: Evidence and experience. (pp. 275-281) edited by Hamid Ghodse, Helen Herrman, Mario Maj and Norman Sartorius. Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom: Wiley-Blackwell. doi: 10.1002/9780470975084.ch22

  • Gartner Coral, Hall, Wayne and McNeill, Ann (2010). Harm reduction policies for tobacco. Harm reduction: evidence, impacts and challenges. (pp. 279-300) edited by Tim Rhodes and Dagmar Hedrich. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.

  • Gartner, C. E. (2008). Smokeless tobacco and harm reduction. Tobacco in Australia: Facts and issues: A comprehensive online resource. (pp. 39-41) edited by M. H. Winstanley and M. M. Scollo. Melbourne, Vic., Australia: Cancer Council Victoria.

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death globally, killing over 7 million people per year. In Australia, smoking causes 20,933 deaths per year, accounting for nearly 1 in 7 deaths and 9% of disease burden. Discussion is growing about how to end the cigarette epidemic, meaning reducing smoking prevalence to a level that is no longer a major public health issue. Once seen as ‘unthinkable’, this goal is now part of mainstream tobacco control research and government health policy. A range of endgame strategies have been proposed; some have been implemented or are under serious consideration in other countries. The NHMRC-funded Centre of Research Excellence on Achieving the Tobacco Endgame (CREATE) will develop the evidence base for and outline a roadmap for Australia to end smoking in Australia. CREATE has four earmarked scholarships available with a possible additional $5,000 per annum top up scholarship available for exceptional canddiates.

    Multiple PhD projects are available covering the topics listed below.

    1. Estimating the impact of proposed endgame strategies on smoking prevalence, particularly for Indigenous peoples, and other priority groups

    2. Identifying the legal barriers and enablers, likely legal challenges and potential defences, of tobacco endgame strategies

    3. Determining policy maker and public support, including among Indigenous peoples, and other priority groups, for tobacco endgame strategies

    4. Optimising public communications about tobacco endgame strategies to inform and generate discussion

    5. Identifying potential unintended impacts and developing appropriate mitigation strategies (including optimising smoking cessation for priority groups)

    Preferred educational background: Undergraduate Class I or IIA honours or Masters degree in Public Health, Health Sciences, Chemistry, Behavioural Sciences, Biostatistics, Epidemiology, Environmental Health, Regulatory Science, Health Law, Health Policy, Communications, Psychology or a related field. Knowledge and experience in health policy or product regulation would be highly valued.

    If you are interested in one of these topics, please contact Associate Professor Gartner to discuss. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander candidates are especially encouraged to apply.

    Please note that only domestic and onshore international students (i.e. you are already physically in Australia) are eligible to apply for these scholarships.

  • Smoking prevalence in the general Australian population is among the lowest of any high income country. However, it still remains a highly prevalent source of exposure to toxic chemical exposure in the Australian population. In most countries, including Australia, the design and construction of tobacco cigarettes remains relatively unregulated.

    Article 9 of the World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control requires parties to the treaty to regulate the contents and emissions of tobacco products. Hence, there have been increasing moves internationally to develop product standards for cigarettes with the aims of reducing the attractiveness and palatability of cigarettes or reducing exposure to harmful and potentially harmful chemicals in tobacco smoke. There has also been a growing interest in banning filters from cigarettes due to their environmental impact. New nicotine products, such as e-cigarettes and other vaporisers and heated tobacco products are creating further new challenges for regulators in determining appropriate product standards. This PhD will develop the evidence base for development of effective regulation of nicotine and tobacco products to assist with the implementation of Article 9 of the WHO FCTC.

    Preferred educational background: Undergraduate Class I or IIA honours or Masters degree in Public Health, Health Sciences, Chemistry, Behavioural Sciences, Biostatistics, Environmental Health, Regulatory Science, Health Law, Health Policy or a related field. Knowledge and experience in health policy or product regulation would be highly valued.

    Please note that only domestic and onshore international students (i.e. you are already physically in Australia) are currently eligible to apply for this project.