Associate Professor Asaduzzaman Khan

Assoc Professor in Biostatistics

School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences
Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences
a.khan2@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 67456

Overview

Asad has been with the University of Queensland since 2006. Prior to this, he has held academic appointments in biostatistics at the University of Sydney and the University of Dhaka. His current research focuses on the epidemiology of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their inter-relationships with health and wellbeing. He has a special interest in examining how/whether physical activity can attenuate or even eliminate the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviour on health and psychosocial wellbeing of children and adolescents. He is interested in understanding the health and wellbeing of immigrants and identifying factors associated with health gaps in order to minimise inequalities and facilitate integration. His methodological research involves the evaluation and development of advanced statistical methods (e.g., latent trait modelling) in analysing ordinal and correlated outcomes in health sciences.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science, University of Dhaka
  • Master of Science, University of Dhaka
  • Master of Public Health, The University of Sydney
  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of New England

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Physical inactivity and sedentariness may be deleterious for health and wellbeing of individuals. Understanding the distribution and determinants (i.e., epidemiology) of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their interrelationships can have considerable public health implications in societies where sedentary and inactive lifestyles have become more prevalent. Furthermore, it would be useful to examine whether physical activity can attenuate or even eliminate the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviours on individuals’ health and psychosocial wellbeing. This research will explore patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, links with physical and psychosocial wellbeing, and if activity can offset potentially detrimental effects of prolonged sedentariness.

  • Patient reported outcomes are widely used in health and rehabilitation sciences. These outcomes are often assessed using different rating scales, which result in ordinal outcome data. Although there are demonstrated advantages of Rasch-based modelling, over the classical methods, such modelling has received a little attention in health and medical research in analysing ordinal outcomes. Additional evidence needs to be generated to demonstrate the inferential costs of using classical methods in analysing ordinal outcomes, which in turn can further strengthen the argument for using Rasch-based modelling. This work will also facilitate the development of guidelines for statistical analyses of rating scale ordinal outcomes.

  • The successful applicant will explore subjective quality of life and components of objectively measured physical activity of the MRFF-funded project Enhancing treatment outcomes after gynaecological cancer: Using exercise to promote health after cancer therapy (the ACUMEN trial). A synopsis of the project follows. Exercise is a potent aid to recovery after reproductive cancer treatment. Exercise has been effectively used in breast and other common cancers to reduce women’s risk of developing treatment-related chronic conditions. However, there is little education and support to help women treated for reproductive cancers to safely and sustainably integrate exercise into their daily routine following treatment. This disparity has created an unmet need. Approximately 20,000 Australian women treated for reproductive cancer have developed, or are at risk of developing, detrimental treatment outcomes.

    The ACUMEN trial addresses this critical unmet health need. ACUMEN has two components. 1. Study 1 is a randomised control trial of a targeted exercise and behavioural change intervention for women previously treated for reproductive cancers. Outcome measures include quality of life, exercise self-efficacy and several physiological measures (e.g VO2peak, blood markers of chronic disease risk). 2. Study 2 is a complementary mixed-method exploration of how best to facilitate the implementation of exercise into clinical practice after cancer treatment. Outcomes include quantitative and qualitative indications of intervention acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. The Role The successful applicants will collect quality of life and physical activity data and examine outcomes commensurate with their disciplinary knowledge and skills. PhD advisors will be drawn from team members with the disciplinary expertise aligned to the candidate’s needs.

    They include: 1. Professor Alexandra McCarthy (https://nmsw.uq.edu.au/profile/2938/sandie-mccarthy) 2. Associate Professor Asad Khan (https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/1742) 3. Dr Tom Bailey (https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/19574) 4. Dr Sjaan Gomersall (https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/7683)

    These PhD opportunities would suit people with a background in one of the following: PE teachers, physios, psychology, occupational therapy, sport and exercise physiology including AEP, epidemiology, or public health.

    Scholarship funding: The proposed supervisors will work with the applicant to submit an application for an RTP scholarship. Students will be awarded either an Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP) Scholarship or a UQ-funded scholarship via a competitive process. Both of these provide a living allowance and a tuition fee offset. For international applicants who will study in Australia on a student visa, the scholarship also includes an allowance for single overseas student health cover. These scholarships are usually awarded through the Graduate School's Scholarship Rounds. Applications open 30 august 2021 and close on the 27th September 2021. If successful, the applicant would be expected to start in RQ1 in 2022.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Joint Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Physical inactivity and sedentariness may be deleterious for health and wellbeing of individuals. Understanding the distribution and determinants (i.e., epidemiology) of physical activity, sedentary behaviour, and their interrelationships can have considerable public health implications in societies where sedentary and inactive lifestyles have become more prevalent. Furthermore, it would be useful to examine whether physical activity can attenuate or even eliminate the detrimental effects of sedentary behaviours on individuals’ health and psychosocial wellbeing. This research will explore patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, links with physical and psychosocial wellbeing, and if activity can offset potentially detrimental effects of prolonged sedentariness.

  • Patient reported outcomes are widely used in health and rehabilitation sciences. These outcomes are often assessed using different rating scales, which result in ordinal outcome data. Although there are demonstrated advantages of Rasch-based modelling, over the classical methods, such modelling has received a little attention in health and medical research in analysing ordinal outcomes. Additional evidence needs to be generated to demonstrate the inferential costs of using classical methods in analysing ordinal outcomes, which in turn can further strengthen the argument for using Rasch-based modelling. This work will also facilitate the development of guidelines for statistical analyses of rating scale ordinal outcomes.

  • The successful applicant will explore subjective quality of life and components of objectively measured physical activity of the MRFF-funded project Enhancing treatment outcomes after gynaecological cancer: Using exercise to promote health after cancer therapy (the ACUMEN trial). A synopsis of the project follows. Exercise is a potent aid to recovery after reproductive cancer treatment. Exercise has been effectively used in breast and other common cancers to reduce women’s risk of developing treatment-related chronic conditions. However, there is little education and support to help women treated for reproductive cancers to safely and sustainably integrate exercise into their daily routine following treatment. This disparity has created an unmet need. Approximately 20,000 Australian women treated for reproductive cancer have developed, or are at risk of developing, detrimental treatment outcomes.

    The ACUMEN trial addresses this critical unmet health need. ACUMEN has two components. 1. Study 1 is a randomised control trial of a targeted exercise and behavioural change intervention for women previously treated for reproductive cancers. Outcome measures include quality of life, exercise self-efficacy and several physiological measures (e.g VO2peak, blood markers of chronic disease risk). 2. Study 2 is a complementary mixed-method exploration of how best to facilitate the implementation of exercise into clinical practice after cancer treatment. Outcomes include quantitative and qualitative indications of intervention acceptability, appropriateness, feasibility, clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness. The Role The successful applicants will collect quality of life and physical activity data and examine outcomes commensurate with their disciplinary knowledge and skills. PhD advisors will be drawn from team members with the disciplinary expertise aligned to the candidate’s needs.

    They include: 1. Professor Alexandra McCarthy (https://nmsw.uq.edu.au/profile/2938/sandie-mccarthy) 2. Associate Professor Asad Khan (https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/1742) 3. Dr Tom Bailey (https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/19574) 4. Dr Sjaan Gomersall (https://researchers.uq.edu.au/researcher/7683)

    These PhD opportunities would suit people with a background in one of the following: PE teachers, physios, psychology, occupational therapy, sport and exercise physiology including AEP, epidemiology, or public health.

    Scholarship funding: The proposed supervisors will work with the applicant to submit an application for an RTP scholarship. Students will be awarded either an Australian Government Research Training Program (RTP) Scholarship or a UQ-funded scholarship via a competitive process. Both of these provide a living allowance and a tuition fee offset. For international applicants who will study in Australia on a student visa, the scholarship also includes an allowance for single overseas student health cover. These scholarships are usually awarded through the Graduate School's Scholarship Rounds. Applications open 30 august 2021 and close on the 27th September 2021. If successful, the applicant would be expected to start in RQ1 in 2022.