Dr Peter Jacobson

Lecturer in CMP

Physics
Faculty of Science
p.jacobson@uq.edu.au
+61 7 334 68753

Overview

Dr Peter Jacobson's research interests are: Scanning Probe Microscopy (STM/AFM), Single Atom Magnetism, Kondo Physics, 2D Materials, Oxide Surfaces, and Molecular Machines.

He received his PhD from Tulane University (New Orleans) in 2012. Before coming to UQ in June 2019, he worked at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (Stuttgart, Germany), TU Wien (Vienna, Austria), and Uni Graz (Graz, Austria).

For more details on research see: https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=4ZcJt34AAAAJ&hl=en

At UQ, his work is focused on improving the fabrication processes for superconducting quantum devices. The centrepiece of his laboratory is a new low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (LT STM/AFM) which allows devices to be probed and manipulated on the atomic scale. If you are interested in seeing single atoms or molecules and how this information can help make better devices, just drop by my office or send me an email!

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Tulane University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Project Level: PhD, Honours, Masters

    Superconducting quantum circuits are one of the leading quantum computing platforms. To advance superconducting quantum computing to a point of practical importance, it is critical to identify and address material imperfections that lead to decoherence. This project will use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore sources of decoherence at the atomic scale. The main tool for these investigations is a new low-temperature STM/AFM installed in Jacobson's laboratory. Students will learn fundamental concepts in superconducting quantum devices, ultrahigh vacuum and cryogenic techniques, and explore how to improve quantum devices.

  • Project Level: Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    High quality factor microwave resonators are critical components of quantum computer architectures. Aluminum resonators on silicon are now standard components in these architectures, but the measured quality factors in these resonators is lower than expected. Recent work suggest that the limiting factor for these devices are imperfections at the metal-substrate interace. This project focuses on preparing atomically precise interfaces between Aluminum and Silicon for improved superconducting qubits. Using new equipment housed at CMM, the student will prepare clean Silicon surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and develop procedures to grow high quality factor resonators.

    The student will gain experience with ultrahigh vacuum equipment, electron spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and low temperature instrumentation.

  • Project Level: PhD, Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy can be used to manipulate and build nanoscale structures atom by atom. In this project, students will use a new low-temperature STM/AFM installed in Jacobson's laboratory to image and manipulate single atoms and molecules. Potential targets include light-emitting molecules as single-photon emitters for quantum computation or improved OLEDs and magnetic materials for data storage.

    The student will gain experience with ultrahigh vacuum equipment, cryogenics, electron diffraction, and low temperature instrumentation.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

  • Guo, Xiao, Donose, Bogdan, Bertling, Karl, He, Xin, Degnan, Zach, Solemanifar, Armin, Laycock, Bronwyn, Fedorov, Arkady, Jacobson, Peter and Rakic, Aleksandar (2021). Advances and challenges in THz scattering SNOM. 8th Australian THz Workshop, Sydney, NSW Australia, 3 December 2021.

  • Jacobson, Peter, Guo, Xiao, He, Xin, Degnan, Zach, Donose, Bogdan, Bertling, Karl, Fedorov, Arkady and Rakic, Aleksandar (2021). Near-field terahertz nanoscopy of coplanar microwave resonators. Australian Institute of Physics Summer Meeting, Brisbane, QLD Australia, 6th-9th December 2021.

  • Jacobson, Peter, Wang, Jianguo, Connors, Matthew, Gong, Xue-Qing, Selloni, Annabella and Diebold, Ulrike (2008). COLL 450-Bonding configurations of catechol on rutile and anatase TiO2. 235th American Chemical Society National Meeting, New Orleans, LA, United States, April 6-10, 2008. Washington, DC, United States: American Chemical Society.

  • Jacobson, Peter, Li, Shao-Chun, Wang, Chuandao and Diebold, Ulrike (2008). Decomposition of catechol and carbonaceous residues on TiO(2)(110): A model system for cleaning of extreme ultraviolet lithography optics. 52nd International Conference on Electron, Ion and Photon Beam Technology and Nanofabrication, Portland, United States, May 27-30, 2008. Melville, NY, United States: A I P Publishing LLC. doi: 10.1116/1.3002566

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Project Level: PhD, Honours, Masters

    Superconducting quantum circuits are one of the leading quantum computing platforms. To advance superconducting quantum computing to a point of practical importance, it is critical to identify and address material imperfections that lead to decoherence. This project will use scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore sources of decoherence at the atomic scale. The main tool for these investigations is a new low-temperature STM/AFM installed in Jacobson's laboratory. Students will learn fundamental concepts in superconducting quantum devices, ultrahigh vacuum and cryogenic techniques, and explore how to improve quantum devices.

  • Project Level: Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    High quality factor microwave resonators are critical components of quantum computer architectures. Aluminum resonators on silicon are now standard components in these architectures, but the measured quality factors in these resonators is lower than expected. Recent work suggest that the limiting factor for these devices are imperfections at the metal-substrate interace. This project focuses on preparing atomically precise interfaces between Aluminum and Silicon for improved superconducting qubits. Using new equipment housed at CMM, the student will prepare clean Silicon surfaces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions and develop procedures to grow high quality factor resonators.

    The student will gain experience with ultrahigh vacuum equipment, electron spectroscopy, electron diffraction, and low temperature instrumentation.

  • Project Level: PhD, Honours, Masters, Winter/Summer

    Scanning tunneling microscopy and atomic force microscopy can be used to manipulate and build nanoscale structures atom by atom. In this project, students will use a new low-temperature STM/AFM installed in Jacobson's laboratory to image and manipulate single atoms and molecules. Potential targets include light-emitting molecules as single-photon emitters for quantum computation or improved OLEDs and magnetic materials for data storage.

    The student will gain experience with ultrahigh vacuum equipment, cryogenics, electron diffraction, and low temperature instrumentation.