Professor Daniel Rodriguez

Professorial Research Fellow

Centre for Crop Science
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
d.rodriguez@uq.edu.au
+61 7 535 15091

Overview

My research is focused on exploring the functioning of agricultural systems. My projects are often carried out in multidisciplinary teams and with the participation of multiple stakeholders e.g. farmers, private consultants, agribusinesses, policy. My aims are to understand how people make decisions and act, how those decisions can be informed, and how the final actions affect the performance of crops, animals, farm businesses, the broader environment and the social and food systems. I also provide science leadership to a multidisciplinary team of crop physiologists, agronomists, modellers and socio-economists i.e. QAAFI Farming Systems Research Group. The key mission of this group is to identify pathways for the sustainable intensification of agriculture in Australia and in low-income countries.

Research Interests

  • Risk management in agriculture
    My research is focused on exploring the functioning of agricultural systems. My projects are often carried out in multidisciplinary teams and with the participation of multiple stakeholders e.g. farmers, private consultants, agribusinesses, policy. This presents unique challenges, including longer lead times to publication compared to disciplinary research. My aims are to understand how people make decisions and act, how those decisions can be informed, and how the final actions affect the performance of crops, animals, farm businesses, the broader environment and the social and food systems.

Research Impacts

Evidence of his impact include, the development of whole farm simulation capacity within the APSIM model, which lead to UQ’s participation in a $40M project, resulting in the increased food security of 240,000 smallholder farmers in Africa; the production of evidence on how improved crop designs could deliver large profit gains (~$140 ha-1year-1) in Queensland’s 600,000 ha sorghum industry; and the identification of farm business designs that are more profitable, sustainable and resilient in face of increasing climate variability and change. He achieved this in partnerships with farmers, National and International donors and the private sector. His leadership in research is also evidenced by receiving 5 invitations as a keynote speaker at international conferences in the last 5 years. He annually present at industry forums, and he is active with government groups in the translation of his research into industry practice; and in informing policy. Prof Rodriguez leads and mentors a team of 5 full time researchers. He has successfully graduated 6 PhD students since starting at the University of Queensland in 2010, and mentored multiple Honours, MSc and MPhil students in collaboration with UQ Schools. He is presently the President of the Australian Society of Agronomy (2019-21) and organiser of the Australian Agronomy Conference, Toowoomba October 2021. Prof Rodriguez was member of the Local Confirmation and Promotions Committee at UQ’s Faculty of Science (2014-2016); he is member of the College of Experts at UQ’s Global Change Institute; he was Editor-in-Chief of Agricultural Systems 2013-2018 (IF 3.19); he is member of the Editorial Board of Agricultural Systems, and Associate Editor of Field Crops Research; he is one of the permanent organisers of the International Symposium for Farming Systems Design since 2009, the Global Food Security Conference in 2015 and 2017, and the World Congress on Conservation Agriculture in 2011; and organiser of the 2021 Australian Agronomy Conference in Toowoomba Queensland.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Wageningen University
  • Master of Science in Crop Science, Wageningen University

Publications

  • Snow, Val, Rodriguez, Daniel, Dynes, Robyn, Kaye-Blake, William, Mallawaarachchi, Thilak, Zydenbos, Sue, Cong, Lei, Obadovic, Irena, Agnew, Rob, Amery, Nicole, Bell, Lindsay, Benson, Cristy, Clinton, Peter, Dreccer, M. Fernanda, Dunningham, Andrew, Gleeson, Madeleine, Harrison, Matthew, Hayward, Alice, Holzworth, Dean, Johnstone, Paul, Meinke, Holger, Mitter, Neena, Mugera, Amin, Pannell, David, Silva, Luis F.P., Roura, Eugeni, Siddharth, Prince, Siddique, Kadambot H.M. and Stevens, David (2021). Resilience achieved via multiple compensating subsystems: The immediate impacts of COVID-19 control measures on the agri-food systems of Australia and New Zealand. Agricultural Systems, 187 103025, 1-10. doi: 10.1016/j.agsy.2020.103025

  • Rotili, Diego Hernán, Abeledo, L. Gabriela, deVoil, Peter, Rodríguez, Daniel and Maddonni, Gustavo Ángel (2021). Exploring the effect of tillers on the water economy, plant growth and kernel set of low-density maize crops. Agricultural Water Management, 243 106424, 106424. doi: 10.1016/j.agwat.2020.106424

  • Borrell, Andrew, van Oosterom, Erik, George-Jaeggli, Barbara, Rodriguez, Daniel, Eyre, Joe, Jordan, David J., Mace, Emma, Singh, Vijaya, Vadez, Vincent, Bell, Mike, Godwin, Ian, Cruickshank, Alan, Tao, Yongfu and Hammer, Graeme (2021). Sorghum. Crop physiology applications for genetic improvement and Agronomy. (pp. 196-221) edited by V. Sadras and D. Calderini. London, United Kingdom: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-819194-1.00005-0

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Master Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Pulses can increase profits, diversify income and increase sustainability. Megatrends in global food markets favour consumption of plant-based protein. However, significant productivity gaps remain, driven by lack of understanding of pulse physiology and agronomy. This project focuses on chickpea in Queensland, and will deliver location, soil and season-specific management options that optimise production to better enable growers to (i) attain water limited yield potential, (ii) increase profitability and (iii) reduce risk.

  • Background

    Australia’s climate has warmed by about 1.4 °C since 1910, leading to an increase in the frequency of extreme heat events and the frequency and intensity of water stresses. Climate trends and ongoing climate change provide clear focus on the need to increase crop adaptation to water and heat stresses.

    Here we propose that early sowing of sorghum could increase sowing opportunities and simultaneously avoid heat and water stress at flowering in some cropping systems and locations.

    Previous research identified that early sown sorghum crops show high yield potentials with increased downside risk due to (i) poorly emerged crops when sown in cold soils, (ii) the likelihood of frost damage, and (iii) stunted growth due to lower than optimum air temperatures. However, there is no clear information on the benefits and trade-offs of the practice. Particularly there is limited information on low temperature thresholds for frost damage, cold temperature impacts on crop establishment, growth and development, water use dynamics, water use efficiency, yield potential and yield components, and the effects on subsequent crops in the cropping system for winter sown sorghum agronomic packages.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Book

Book Chapter

  • Borrell, Andrew, van Oosterom, Erik, George-Jaeggli, Barbara, Rodriguez, Daniel, Eyre, Joe, Jordan, David J., Mace, Emma, Singh, Vijaya, Vadez, Vincent, Bell, Mike, Godwin, Ian, Cruickshank, Alan, Tao, Yongfu and Hammer, Graeme (2021). Sorghum. Crop physiology applications for genetic improvement and Agronomy. (pp. 196-221) edited by V. Sadras and D. Calderini. London, United Kingdom: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-819194-1.00005-0

  • Sadras, Victor, Alston, Julian, Aphalo, Pedro, Connor, David, Denison, R. Ford, Fischer, Tony, Gray, Richard, Hayman, Peter, Kirkegaard, John, Kirchmann, Holger, Kropff, Martin, Lafitte, H. Renee, Langridge, Peter, Lenne, Jill, Mínguez, M. Inés, Passioura, John, Porter, John R., Reeves, Tim, Rodriguez, Daniel, Ryan, Megan, Villalobos, Francisco J. and Wood, David (2020). Making science more effective for agriculture. Advances in Agronomy. (pp. 153-177) Maryland Heights, MO, United States: Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/bs.agron.2020.05.003

  • Serafin L, Dang YP, Freebairn D, Rodriguez D and Yash Dang (2019). Evolution of conservation agriculture in summer rainfall areas. Australian Agriculture in 2020: From Conservation to Automation. (pp. 65-78) edited by J Pratley and J Kirkegaard and J Kirkegaard. Charles Sturt University: Wagga Wagga: Agronomy Australia.

  • Rodriguez, Daniel, Roxburgh, Caspar, Farnsworth, Claire, Ferrante, Ariel, Eyre, Joseph, Irvine-Brown, Stuart, McLean, James and Bielich, Martin (2017). Climate risk management in maize cropping systems. Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize - Volume 2: cultivation techniques, pest and disease control. (pp. 227-245) edited by Dave Watson. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Burleigh Dodds. doi: 10.19103/AS.2016.0002.26

  • Temesgen, Abeya, Fukai, Shu and Rodriguez, Daniel (2017). Intercropping in sustainable maize cultivation. Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize - Volume 2: cultivation techniques, pest and disease control. (pp. 1-23) edited by Dave Watson. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Burleigh Dodds.

  • Rodriguez, Daniel, de Voil, Peter and Power, B. (2017). Modelling dryland agricultural systems. Innovations in dryland agriculture. (pp. 239-256) edited by Muhammad Farooq and Kadambot H. M. Siddique. Cham, Switzerland: Springer . doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-47928-6_9

  • Dimes, John, Rodriguez, Daniel and Potgieter, Andries (2015). Raising productivity of maize-based cropping systems in eastern and southern Africa: Step-wise intensification options. Crop Physiology Applications for Genetic Improvement and Agronomy. (pp. 93-110) edited by Sadras, Victor O and Calderini, Daniel F. United States of America: Elsevier : Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-417104-6.00005-4

  • Rodriguez, Daniel, Robson, Andrew J. and Belford, Robert (2009). Dynamic and functional monitoring technologies for applications in crop management.. Crop physiology: Applications for genetic improvement and agronomy. (pp. 489-584) edited by Victor Sadras and Daniel Calderini. Burlington, U.S.A.: Elsevier Academic Press. doi: 10.1016/B978-0-12-374431-9.00019-0

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Master Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Master Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Pulses can increase profits, diversify income and increase sustainability. Megatrends in global food markets favour consumption of plant-based protein. However, significant productivity gaps remain, driven by lack of understanding of pulse physiology and agronomy. This project focuses on chickpea in Queensland, and will deliver location, soil and season-specific management options that optimise production to better enable growers to (i) attain water limited yield potential, (ii) increase profitability and (iii) reduce risk.

  • Background

    Australia’s climate has warmed by about 1.4 °C since 1910, leading to an increase in the frequency of extreme heat events and the frequency and intensity of water stresses. Climate trends and ongoing climate change provide clear focus on the need to increase crop adaptation to water and heat stresses.

    Here we propose that early sowing of sorghum could increase sowing opportunities and simultaneously avoid heat and water stress at flowering in some cropping systems and locations.

    Previous research identified that early sown sorghum crops show high yield potentials with increased downside risk due to (i) poorly emerged crops when sown in cold soils, (ii) the likelihood of frost damage, and (iii) stunted growth due to lower than optimum air temperatures. However, there is no clear information on the benefits and trade-offs of the practice. Particularly there is limited information on low temperature thresholds for frost damage, cold temperature impacts on crop establishment, growth and development, water use dynamics, water use efficiency, yield potential and yield components, and the effects on subsequent crops in the cropping system for winter sown sorghum agronomic packages.