Dr Ibrahim Javed

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Overview

Dr. Ibrahim Javed is NHMRC Emerging Leadership Fellow at the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The University of Queensland. He earned his PhD degree from Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Monash University in 2019. Prior to PhD, Dr. Javed graduated with Doctor of Pharmacy degree (2011) from University of Sargodha and Master of Philosophy in Pharmaceutical Chemistry (2014) from Bahauddin Zakariya University, Pakistan. After M.Phil, he worked as Research Assistant (2013-16) at Department of Chemistry, Lahore University of Management Sciences where he developed nano-pharmaceuticals for drug delivery and to improve the pharmacokinetic profiles of hydrophobic drugs. With extensive research experience in the synthesis of pharmaceutical nanomaterials, in vivo modelling, pharmacokinetics and protein misfolding diseases, Dr. Javed has published >50 research publications in prestigious journals like Nature Communications, Nano Letter, Advanced Science and Small.

Research Interests

  • Gut-Brain Axis
    The role of the gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of neuronal diseases and controlling that role for pharmaceutical and pharmacological advantages. We are exploring how different metabolites from gut bacteria access and press the neuronal homeostasis to trigger or accelerate pathological cascades.
  • Nanomedicine
    Pharmaceutically rationale design of nanomedicine to control disease pathologies, specifically the protein aggregation diseases. We are working on biomimetic nanomedicine to be either used as a medicinal agent or to deliver therapeutic cargo. We are focusing on the overall nanostructure, surface modalities and chemical excipients to be rationally selected with respect to the pathophysiological and pharmacological considerations.
  • Protein misfolding and aggregation diseases
    The pathological paradigm of protein misfolding and self-assembly into long twisted fibrils, called amyloid, provides underlying pathology for a range of diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, Type-2-Diabetes and infection mediated inflammations in the body. We are working on the cross-interactions of the protein-misfolding processes across different diseases and even across pathological and functional amyloids such as the involvement of microbial amyloids in triggering pathological amyloidosis.

Research Impacts

Dr. Javed's research focuses on understanding the pathophysiology of protein misfolding diseases, i.e., Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Type-2-Diabetes and the biochemical interference from gut-bacteria. He also uses functional amyloids, as beta-lactoglobulin and casein from milk, to craft nanomedicine against amyloid diseases. He has developed in vivo model systems, using zebrafish, to study the pathogenesis of amyloid diseases as well as interaction, fate and mitigation profiling of nanomaterials. Dr. Javed's is also exploring the biofilm component of microbial colonies (like FapC from Pseudomonas and CsgA from E. coli) and Gut-Brain axis to unravel the associations of gut microbiome with the development of amyloid based neurological disorders.

Publications

  • Munir, Muhammad Usman, Salman, Sajal, Javed, Ibrahim, Bukhari, Syed Nasir Abbas, Ahmad, Naveed, Shad, Naveed Akhter and Aziz, Farooq (2021). Nano-hydroxyapatite as a delivery system: overview and advancements. Artificial Cells, Nanomedicine and Biotechnology, 49 (1), 717-727. doi: 10.1080/21691401.2021.2016785

  • Kalsoom, Umme, Alazmi, Meshari, Farrukh, Hafiz Syed Usama Bin, Chung, Ka Hang Karen, Alshammari, Nawaf, Kakinen, Aleksandr, Chotana, Ghayoor Abbas, Javed, Ibrahim, Davis, Thomas Paul and Saleem, Rahman Shah Zaib (2021). Structure dependent differential modulation of Aβ fibrillization by selenadiazole-based inhibitors. ACS Chemical Neuroscience, 12 (20), 3806-3817. doi: 10.1021/acschemneuro.1c00478

  • Andrikopoulos, Nicholas, Song, Zhiyuan, Wan, Xulin, Douek, Alon M., Javed, Ibrahim, Fu, Changkui, Xing, Yanting, Xin, Fangyun, Li, Yuhuan, Kakinen, Aleksandr, Koppel, Kairi, Qiao, Ruirui, Whittaker, Andrew K., Kaslin, Jan, Davis, Thomas P., Song, Yang, Ding, Feng and Ke, Pu Chun (2021). Inhibition of amyloid aggregation and toxicity with Janus iron oxide nanoparticles. Chemistry of Materials, 33 (16) acs.chemmater.1c01947, 6484-6500. doi: 10.1021/acs.chemmater.1c01947

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Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • The gut microbiome has a symbiotic as well as pathogenic relation with the human host. We are exploring the role of infectious gut bacteria in triggering and accelerating the neurodegeneration pathologies and designing pharmaceutically intelligent nanomedicine to control such pathogenic extra-intestinal access of gut bacteria. The PhD students enrolled in this project will be working at the forefront of pharmacological and biochemical techniques to establish the molecular cascade and interaction of gut-microbiome with different pathophysiological barriers. They will also be synthesizing the next generation of nanomedicine to exploit the gut-microbiome in pharmacological synergism.

  • Protein misfolding and aggregation into fibrils, called amyloids, is a universal phenomenon that ranges from a variety of functional perspectives such as microbial biofilms and melanin deposition to pathological paradigms such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Nanomedicine with a biomimetic design and therapeutically rational cargo can provide a pharmaceutical tool to target unwanted amyloid deposits in the tissues. The students working in this project will be synthesizing biomimetic nanoparticles and tuning their bio-nano capacities to target, dissolve the already formed amyloids and inhibit the formation of new amyloid plaques.

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Publications

Book Chapter

  • Peng, Guotao, Zil-e-Huma, , Umair, Muhammad, Hussain, Irshad and Javed, Ibrahim (2020). Nanosilver at the interface of biomedical applications, toxicology, and synthetic strategies. Metal Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery and Diagnostic Applications. (pp. 119-139) edited by Muhammad Raza Shah, Muhammad Imran and Shafi Ullah. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier. doi: 10.1016/b978-0-12-816960-5.00008-2

Journal Article

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • The gut microbiome has a symbiotic as well as pathogenic relation with the human host. We are exploring the role of infectious gut bacteria in triggering and accelerating the neurodegeneration pathologies and designing pharmaceutically intelligent nanomedicine to control such pathogenic extra-intestinal access of gut bacteria. The PhD students enrolled in this project will be working at the forefront of pharmacological and biochemical techniques to establish the molecular cascade and interaction of gut-microbiome with different pathophysiological barriers. They will also be synthesizing the next generation of nanomedicine to exploit the gut-microbiome in pharmacological synergism.

  • Protein misfolding and aggregation into fibrils, called amyloids, is a universal phenomenon that ranges from a variety of functional perspectives such as microbial biofilms and melanin deposition to pathological paradigms such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Nanomedicine with a biomimetic design and therapeutically rational cargo can provide a pharmaceutical tool to target unwanted amyloid deposits in the tissues. The students working in this project will be synthesizing biomimetic nanoparticles and tuning their bio-nano capacities to target, dissolve the already formed amyloids and inhibit the formation of new amyloid plaques.