Dr Elizabeth Edwards

Senior Lecturer

School of Education
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
elizabeth.edwards@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 56215

Overview

Dr Edwards' research collaborations span education, psychology and medical education. She has a growing track-record for conducting robust laboratory studies examining individual differences in cognitive performance under situational stress. Her work supports the notion that an inability to efficiently process information and maintain concentration, plays a critical role in the development and maintenance of emotional disorders. Her latest work focusses on the translation of theory-driven, lab-based science into treatments for clinical problems.

Dr Edwards completed a PhD and an honours degree in psychology (Bond University), and an undergraduate degree in education (Griffith University). For over two decades, she has worked as a primary classroom teacher, special education teacher, guidance officer, and psychologist. She has taught and supervised clinical, professional and research skills in education, psychology and medicine and worked in higher education in the United Kingdom and Australia. Dr Edwards joined The University of Queensland in 2020 to teach into the Master of Educational Studies (Guidance, Counselling and Careers).

Research Interests

  • Anxiety, memory and attentional control
  • Cognitive control training
  • Behaviour change counselling

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Bond University
  • Graduate Diploma of Psychology, Bond University
  • Bachelor of Social Science (Psychology) with Hon, Bond University
  • Bachelor of Education, Griffith University

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Studies in cognitive neuroscience confirm that problems with attentional control and information processing efficiency play a critical role in the development and maintenance of vulnerability to anxiety and depression. An emerging area of evidence-based research has attempted to remediate these cognitive deficits using training interventions. Two weeks of daily cognitive control training (i.e., memory and attention training) has demonstrated promise in reducing anxiety and depression in samples of adults and adolescents. This project will investigate the efficacy of using cognitive control training methodology with children in educational settings.

  • In recent years, research in problematic smartphone behaviour has proliferated. To date however, limited work has explored the characteristics underpinning the relationship between nomophobia (no-mobile-phone-phobia) and internalising psychopathologies (e.g., anxiety and depression) in adolescents. Driven by theory, this project will investigate the link between problem smartphone use and learning, and explore moderating factors such as anxiety and attentional control. The findings will assist educators and students to optimize learning.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Studies in cognitive neuroscience confirm that problems with attentional control and information processing efficiency play a critical role in the development and maintenance of vulnerability to anxiety and depression. An emerging area of evidence-based research has attempted to remediate these cognitive deficits using training interventions. Two weeks of daily cognitive control training (i.e., memory and attention training) has demonstrated promise in reducing anxiety and depression in samples of adults and adolescents. This project will investigate the efficacy of using cognitive control training methodology with children in educational settings.

  • In recent years, research in problematic smartphone behaviour has proliferated. To date however, limited work has explored the characteristics underpinning the relationship between nomophobia (no-mobile-phone-phobia) and internalising psychopathologies (e.g., anxiety and depression) in adolescents. Driven by theory, this project will investigate the link between problem smartphone use and learning, and explore moderating factors such as anxiety and attentional control. The findings will assist educators and students to optimize learning.