Dr Yang Peng

Honorary Research Fellow

School of Public Health
Faculty of Medicine

Overview

Yang is an epidemiologist and biostatistician focused on the improvement of chronic disese prevention and survival. He is interested in analysing large-scale surveys and hospitalizations datasets, with the use of several complex statistical models.

Research Interests

  • Data linkage in medicine
    The large-scaled linked surveys and hospitalisations datasets could answer quite a few key research questions in public health and clinical medicine. However, most of them are largely underused and wasted. The share and use of them are greatly appreciated.
  • Lifestyle factors and chronic diseases
    It is well known that lifestyle factors are associated with risk of chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer. However, whether the association strength between lifestyle factors and chronic diseases varied by subpopulations and what are the combined effects of lifestyle factors on chronic diseases are not well studied. They need to be investigated in large-scale population-based studies.

Research Impacts

His findings provided up-to-date information to the policy makers on the lifestyle factors status in the general Australian population, which facilitates the chronic disease prevention and management in the communities. His works also played a crucial role in closing the survival gaps between Indigenous and non-Indigenous cancer patients and improved the survival and quality of life for those hospitalised cardiovascular disease and cancer patients in Australia.

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, The University of Queensland
  • Master of Medicine, GDPU

Publications

View all Publications

Available Projects

  • Although unhealthy lifestyle factors are known to be associated with increased chronic disease incidence and mortality in adults, a number of questions on the topic are still to be answered (e.g., do the magnitude of associations changed over time and varied by demographaphic or socioeconomic factors?) Join our team and work them out with large national and international cohorts.

  • The burden of chronic diseases is more obvious in some 'disadvantaged' population (e.g., First Nations and socioeconomically disadvantaged people). However, the contributors of the inequalities are not well documented and they need to be answered to close the gap in chronic disease risk.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Journal Article

Other Outputs

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Although unhealthy lifestyle factors are known to be associated with increased chronic disease incidence and mortality in adults, a number of questions on the topic are still to be answered (e.g., do the magnitude of associations changed over time and varied by demographaphic or socioeconomic factors?) Join our team and work them out with large national and international cohorts.

  • The burden of chronic diseases is more obvious in some 'disadvantaged' population (e.g., First Nations and socioeconomically disadvantaged people). However, the contributors of the inequalities are not well documented and they need to be answered to close the gap in chronic disease risk.