Dr Anthony Halog

Lecturer

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences
Faculty of Science
a.halog@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 56141

Overview

Anthony Halog is a Confirmed Continuing University Lecturer at the University of Queensland and joined from the University of Maine, USA where he was an Assistant Professor (Tenure Track) in Industrial Ecology. His research focuses on the sustainability of human-nature complexity through understanding the nexus of material and energy systems. Over the years, he has been working on the foundation and industrial applications of Greening Supply Chains, Life Cycle Management, Circular/Green Economy, Sustainable Operations, Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment (LCSA), and Resource Management & Bioeconomy. His Research Group in Industrial Ecology and Circular Economy at UQ (http://industrialece.wixsite.com/main) endeavours to provide service/expertise for industry clients (e.g. agri-food-energy systems) in transforming existing linear system-based value chains and operations towards circularity, which enhances their resource efficiency & productivity, creates added value products from wastes, and reduces emissions into the environment for a more sustainable consumption and production in the future. He is keen in pursuing collaborative and cross-disciplinary research across industries via system analysis and modelling. Prior to his position at the University of Maine, he was an Assistant Professor in Operations Management in the School of Business at Brock University, Canada (2006-2008). Dr Halog has held various positions as Visiting Faculty Fellow at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory of US Department of Energy, USA; as an Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Research Fellow at the Finnish Forest Research Institute and the Centre for Circular Economy, University of Exeter, UK; as Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan and the University of Tokyo; and as an Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the National Research Council of Canada. He participated in sustainability assessment-related courses at the United Nations University, Japan and Vienna University of Economics and Business, Austria. His qualification in environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) has been certified by the American Centre for Life Cycle Assessment (ACLCA) since January 2009.

Anthony has authored and co-authored more than 80 publications and presented papers in industrial ecology and circular economy, and has been a visiting research scholar and fellow in several leading research institutions in Europe, North America and Asia. He has given keynote talks worldwide to share his expertise in greening supply chains, circular economy and industrial sustainability. He has served on different grant review panels at an international level such as in US South Central Sun Grant DOT/ USDA in bioenergy and biofuels research projects. He has served in several technical and organising committees in conferences over the past years and involved in editorial boards in peer-refereed journals. Before UQ, he received funding from highly competitive grants and was involved in US-funded projects of ~$7.7 million as a CI, out of which $841,281 was awarded to his specific research on life cycle sustainability assessment of biomass-based technological systems. He had been awarded highly competitive early-career fellowships in Japan, Canada and the USA, equivalent to ARC DECRA/UQ. Together with his collaborators, he has received grants and fellowships for a total of $69192 non-ARC funds in Australia. More about him at https://au.linkedin.com/in/anthony-halog-504133b

Research Interests

  • Industrial Ecology
    Industrial ecology (IE) is the study of material and energy flows through industrial systems. The global industrial economy can be modelled as a network of industrial processes that extract resources from the Earth and transform those resources into commodities which can be bought and sold to meet the needs of humanity. Industrial ecology seeks to quantify the material flows and document the industrial processes that make modern society function. Industrial ecologists are often concerned with the impacts that industrial activities have on the environment, with use of the planet's supply of natural resources, and with problems of waste disposal. Industrial ecology is a young but growing multidisciplinary field of research which combines aspects of engineering, economics, sociology, toxicology and the natural sciences. Industrial ecology has been defined as a "systems-based, multidisciplinary discourse that seeks to understand emergent behaviour of complex integrated human/natural systems". The field approaches issues of sustainability by examining problems from multiple perspectives, usually involving aspects of sociology, the environment, economy and technology. The name comes from the idea that the analogy of natural systems should be used as an aid in understanding how to design sustainable industrial systems.
  • Circular Economy
    A circular economy is an economic system aimed at minimising waste and making the most of resources. In a circular system resource input and waste, emission, and energy leakage are minimized by slowing, closing, and narrowing energy and material loops; this can be achieved through long-lasting design, maintenance, repair, reuse, remanufacturing, refurbishing, and recycling. This regenerative approach is in contrast to the traditional linear economy, which has a 'take, make, dispose' model of production. Proponents of the circular economy suggest that a sustainable world does not mean a drop in the quality of life for consumers, and can be achieved without loss of revenue or extra costs for manufacturers. The argument is that circular business models can be as profitable as linear models, allowing us to keep enjoying similar products and services.
  • Green Economy
    Green economy is defined as economy that aims at reducing environmental risks and ecological scarcities, and that aims for sustainable development without degrading the environment. It is closely related with ecological economics, but has a more politically applied focus. The 2011 UNEP Green Economy Report argues "that to be green, an economy must not only be efficient, but also fair. Fairness implies recognizing global and country level equity dimensions, particularly in assuring a just transition to an economy that is low-carbon, resource efficient, and socially inclusive.
  • Transitions to Sustainability
  • Corporate Environmental Management
  • Green Supply Chain Management
  • Circular Bioeconomy

Research Impacts

A key indicator of the quality and impact of his research outputs other than publications are the important role he has played in developing and advancing life cycle sustainability analysis methods, particularly in the challenge of industrial transformation, for pursuing green and circular economy. UNEP’s interest on his work in life cycle sustainability analysis and its surging applications to various industries globally is worthy to be acknowledged. This shows his high profile in the USA and internationally, particularly with issues relevant to sustainable consumption and production. Further evidence of the quality and impact of his research outputs came from significant interest from the media in the USA and invited presentations around the globe. Current works on life cycle sustainability analysis have influenced in deciding which technological policy to adopt with relevance to bioenergy/biofuels production in the USA. His research projects had been funded by the US Department of Agriculture and Department of Energy. He had been awarded an International Network of Research on Coupled Human and Natural Systems/National Science Foundation to present my work in “Operationalizing Sustainability Principles through Modelling Coupled Human and Natural Systems for Bioenergy Development in the USA. Recommendations arising from conducting life cycle sustainability analysis have been incorporated into technology policy implementation and cleaner production strategies for industrial transformation.

*Media Comments*

1. SEESs Dr Anthony Halog was among 60 Australian early- and mid-career researchers who took part in the 2014 Theo Murphy High Flyers Think Tank in Climate Change Challenges to Health. The Australian Academy of Science brought the group together in Brisbane from 23-25 July 2014 to tackle the complex interactions between increasing weather extremes and the impacts on health, and influence how policymakers and governments will respond to these challenges. More details at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9_aUQr4Qzxs&feature=youtu.be

2. Reports on “ UMaine event to explore what’s really ‘green’, April 06, 2011, USA http://new.bangordailynews.com/2011/04/06/education/umaine-event-to-explore-whats-really-green/?ref=latest

3. Green Products are Put to the Test, by WABI-TV5 News Desk - April 15th 2011, Local News, USA http://www.wabi.tv/news/19459/green-products-are-put-to-the-test

*Expert Advice as a Member of Grant Panel Evaluation*

Due to his expertise in life cycle sustainability assessment, he has been invited to sit in grant panels to evaluate and rank grant proposals submitted to the US National Science Foundation, US Department of Agriculture and US Department of Energy and other grant funding agencies globally. He had been asked about his inputs/opinions on the sustainability implications of emerging product technologies and value chains.

*Consultative/Advisory Roles*

Prior to University of Queensland (UQ),

  • Provided Expert Advice to Forest Industry and Landowners in the USA, such as LCA for Sappi Fine Paper, “Wood Pellet Carbon Footprint” White Paper for International Wood Fuels;
  • Consulted & reviewed White Paper on Carbon Neutrality of forest-based heating fuels in New England, USA;Provided expert advice to US Government agencies such as US Department of Labour’s;(USDOL) O*NET Data Collection Program and Research Triangle Institute on a report on Industrial Ecologist;
  • Reviewed Indicators and Metrics for Sustainable Biofuels Supply Chain at United States Environmental Program Agency (USEPA);
  • Reviewed Carbon Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Calculator for Maine’s Department of Climate Change.

Qualifications

  • Bachelor of Science, UM(PH)
  • Master of Engineering, AIT(TH)
  • Master of Business Administration, Monash University
  • Doctor of Economics, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

  • Doctor Philosophy

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • Challenges facing urban planners and governments continue to mount as populations in urban areas increase, pressure on the world’s resources reaches critical levels and degradation of ecosystems around the world becomes increasingly apparent. The movement towards sustainable development has been met with enthusiasm by decision-makers, although exactly how to achieve this target, or even measure progress towards it, is not entirely evident. This project aims to explore how complex urban systems (e.g. Brisbane) can be modelled holistically using multi-agent based framework, and their sustainability assessed using a systems approach. This project will help produce a roadmap towards sustainable development of cities. The research will entail review of literature, development of a survey, statistical analysis, and potentially use of an urban systems model.

  • This project aims to develop a practical and comprehensive methodology for the integration of Multi Agent Systems (MAS) and life cycle assessment (LCA). In order to identify and characterize the Australian agro-system, this project will develop a prototype computational model to simulate Australian agricultural sector. Preferably, applicant has background in computer science or applied mathematics with experience in agent-based systems as well as strong interest in computation, applied mathematics, optimization and scientific programming. Successful applicant will develop skills in modelling, analysis, data management, scenario and policy formulation and the development of sustainable solutions.

  • This project has a number of objectives. They are;

    • To support the transformation of Australian Food Systems from linear production system to circular economy, the objectives of this project are:

    • To develop a database and apply life cycle and systems-based methods to analyse Australian food-production and consumption patterns;

    • To evaluate impacts on biodiversity, land use, water use, phosphorous consumption on selected food sub-sectors;

    • To propose circular economy models for the industrial transformation of Australian Food System in pursuit of sustainable consumption and production.

    This project can be implemented using any of the life cycle, holistic and system thinking based approaches (particularly, materials flow analysis (MFA), substance flow analysis (SFA), environmental life cycle assessment (LCA), system dynamics, agent based modelling (ABM), multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and data envelopment analysis (DEA). Preferably, applicants have training or exposure in any of the above methods as well as its appropriate software packages.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

    Other advisors:

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Master Philosophy — Principal Advisor

  • Doctor Philosophy — Associate Advisor

    Other advisors:

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • Challenges facing urban planners and governments continue to mount as populations in urban areas increase, pressure on the world’s resources reaches critical levels and degradation of ecosystems around the world becomes increasingly apparent. The movement towards sustainable development has been met with enthusiasm by decision-makers, although exactly how to achieve this target, or even measure progress towards it, is not entirely evident. This project aims to explore how complex urban systems (e.g. Brisbane) can be modelled holistically using multi-agent based framework, and their sustainability assessed using a systems approach. This project will help produce a roadmap towards sustainable development of cities. The research will entail review of literature, development of a survey, statistical analysis, and potentially use of an urban systems model.

  • This project aims to develop a practical and comprehensive methodology for the integration of Multi Agent Systems (MAS) and life cycle assessment (LCA). In order to identify and characterize the Australian agro-system, this project will develop a prototype computational model to simulate Australian agricultural sector. Preferably, applicant has background in computer science or applied mathematics with experience in agent-based systems as well as strong interest in computation, applied mathematics, optimization and scientific programming. Successful applicant will develop skills in modelling, analysis, data management, scenario and policy formulation and the development of sustainable solutions.

  • This project has a number of objectives. They are;

    • To support the transformation of Australian Food Systems from linear production system to circular economy, the objectives of this project are:

    • To develop a database and apply life cycle and systems-based methods to analyse Australian food-production and consumption patterns;

    • To evaluate impacts on biodiversity, land use, water use, phosphorous consumption on selected food sub-sectors;

    • To propose circular economy models for the industrial transformation of Australian Food System in pursuit of sustainable consumption and production.

    This project can be implemented using any of the life cycle, holistic and system thinking based approaches (particularly, materials flow analysis (MFA), substance flow analysis (SFA), environmental life cycle assessment (LCA), system dynamics, agent based modelling (ABM), multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and data envelopment analysis (DEA). Preferably, applicants have training or exposure in any of the above methods as well as its appropriate software packages.

  • This projects aims to develop a prototype computational-based system model for understanding the interrelationship between sustainability, particularly climate change, food systems, dietary choices and human health. Preferably, the applicant has previous training or background in system dynamics and/ or agent based modelling (ABM) including their software packages (e.g. STELLA, Powersim, AnyLogic, Open ABM, REPAST, NetLogo, StarLogo) or has high drive and initiative to learn these computational and quantitative methods for dynamic system modelling and analysis. . Applicants will develop skills in modelling, analysis, data management, scenario and policy formulation and the development of sustainable solutions.

    NOT CURRENTLY AVAILABLE

  • There is an increasing interest around the world to promote the widespread and increased adoption and “sustainable use” of all forms of renewable energy. This includes all forms of energy produced from renewable sources in a sustainable manner including hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar. The main objectives of this project are:

    • Obtaining a comprehensive overview of what environmental and related impact and trade-offs exist in relation to large-scale deployment of each renewable energy technology at all the stages of its lifecycle (e.g. extraction of materials, manufacturing, project implementation, end-of-life treatment), including the identification of diverse – both scientific and perceptive – parameters which affect the understanding and evaluation of impact;

    • Identifying “hot spots” among diverse potential impact areas where we need to pay a particular attention in order to consider their strategies for large-scale renewable energy deployment;

    • The applicant preferably should focus on hydro and bioenergy.

    This project can be implemented using any of the life cycle, holistic and system thinking based approaches (particularly, materials flow analysis (MFA), substance flow analysis (SFA), environmental life cycle assessment (LCA), system dynamics, agent based modelling (ABM), multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and data envelopment analysis (DEA). Preferably, applicants have training or exposure in any of the above methods as well as its appropriate software packages.

  • This project has a number of objectives. They are:

    • To understand the metal and mineral resource requirements of Japanese and Chinese industries, particularly in quantifying the demand of rare earth metals in Japanese industries and demand of mineral and other resources in Chinese industries. The metals and resources are supplied by Australian mining and mineral resource industry.

    • To propose viable models of circular economy in Queensland’s mining and mineral resource industries while respecting ecological limits and meeting long-term requirements of other countries.

    • To develop a database of available metals and other minerals in Australia and quantify their usages.

    This project can be implemented using any of the life cycle, holistic and system thinking based approaches (particularly, materials flow analysis (MFA), substance flow analysis (SFA), environmental life cycle assessment (LCA), system dynamics, agent based modelling (ABM), multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) and data envelopment analysis (DEA).

  • This research project aims to reduce Australia’s energy demand through changing our demand of materials and products across the whole supply chain. Firstly, the objective of the project is to understand the key historical drivers of material and product consumption in Australia for the past 20 years. This will involve extending a monetary-based input-output model with physical and energy data to an integrated hybrid model of the Australian economy and its trading partners. Preferably, student has experience in managing and manipulating large datasets, and is familiar with methods such as lifecycle, material flow and input-output analysis. A background in applied and policy relevant research in the field of sustainable consumption and production modelling and climate policy is preferred. You should have relevant background and/or experience in a relevant discipline (e.g. Sustainable consumption and production, input-output modelling, data envelopment analysis, material flow analysis).

  • Bioenergy is expected to be an important part of the low-carbon energy supply in the future. Besides techno-economic analysis, rigorous assessment of environmental and social impacts of large-scale deployment of bioenergy is needed to ensure its sustainability. This project will focus on developing a spatially and temporally explicit systems model for producing aviation fuels in Australia from possible feedstocks - microalgae, pongamia pinnata, and sugarcane. This will cover a wide range of bioenergy pathways both for transport use and electricity/heat production, with particular emphasis on carbon and water footprints, impact on human health and ecosystems, and economic costs. Uncertainties from various sources will also be dealt with explicitly. Applicants should have a background in Engineering, Mathematics, Physical and Environmental Studies. Experience in numerical modelling using tools such as Matlab, spatial analysis using GIS software or life cycle analysis is highly desirable though not essential.