Associate Professor Francisco Perales Perez

UQ Amplify Associate Professor

School of Social Science
Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
f.perales@uq.edu.au
+61 7 336 51450

Overview

Dr Francisco (Paco) Perales has a background in Sociology and Social Statistics. He holds an undergraduate degree in Sociology from London Metropolitan University, a Masters degree in Sociology and Panel Data Analysis from the University of Essex, and a PhD in Social and Economic Research from the Institute for Social and Economic Research.

Dr Perales's broad research interests are on social stratification and inequality, social disadvantage by gender and sexual orientation, and family and life-course studies. His methodological expertise is on the analysis of complex survey and administrative data - especially longitudinal and panel datasets.

Research Interests

  • Social stratification and inequality
  • Gender and sexual identity
  • Life course studies
  • Families and households
  • Social change
  • Survey research, including longitudinal and panel data analysis

Qualifications

  • Doctor of Philosophy, University of Essex
  • Master of Arts, University of Essex
  • Bachelor of Science (Honours), London Metropolitan University

Publications

View all Publications

Supervision

View all Supervision

Available Projects

  • I am recruiting studies to help me leverage existing large-scale longitudinal datasets to generate new knowledge on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on socio-economic inequalities in Australian society. The project aims are to: (i) monitor the impact of COVID-19 on high-level trends in socio-economic inequalities in Australia, identify groups and outcomes requiring priority attention, and forecast longer-term impacts on inequalities, and (ii) explain heterogeneity between population groups in exposure to pandemic-related stressors and their effects on socio-economic outcomes, and detect factors fostering individual and group resilience

    HDR projects in this space will benefit from new longitudinal survey data made available in 2021 from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey; the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children; Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health; and the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health.

  • Over the past few years I have undertaken a lot of research on the intersections between gender, sexual orientation and life outcomes. This includes studies aimed at understanding health and socio-economic disparities by sexual orientation and the role of stigma and discrimination in producing and reproducing these disparities. It also includes studies on workplace inclusion on the basis of gender and sexuality diversity, and on the individual and social factors contributing to the development of supportive and unsupportive views towards same-sex relations. I am interested in supervising students who also have an interest in this space.

    HDR projects in this space could leverage data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey; Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children; the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health; or the Australian Workplace Equality Index Survey.

  • I am keen to supervise students with a passion for understanding gender inequalities, in Australia or other countries. In this space, I am interested in aspects such as the development of gender-role attitudes, household divisions of labour, parental involvement with children, gender pay gaps, and occupational sex segregation. The role of life-course transitions, such as parenthood, marriage or divorce, on individual and family wellbeing is also of interest to me.

    This research could be based on longitudinal survey data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey, or Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children.

View all Available Projects

Publications

Featured Publications

Book

  • Parsell, Cameron, Clarke, Andrew and Perales, Francisco (2021). Charity and poverty in advanced welfare states. Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom: Routledge. doi: 10.4324/9781003150572

Book Chapter

Journal Article

Conference Publication

Other Outputs

Grants (Administered at UQ)

PhD and MPhil Supervision

Current Supervision

Completed Supervision

Possible Research Projects

Note for students: The possible research projects listed on this page may not be comprehensive or up to date. Always feel free to contact the staff for more information, and also with your own research ideas.

  • I am recruiting studies to help me leverage existing large-scale longitudinal datasets to generate new knowledge on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on socio-economic inequalities in Australian society. The project aims are to: (i) monitor the impact of COVID-19 on high-level trends in socio-economic inequalities in Australia, identify groups and outcomes requiring priority attention, and forecast longer-term impacts on inequalities, and (ii) explain heterogeneity between population groups in exposure to pandemic-related stressors and their effects on socio-economic outcomes, and detect factors fostering individual and group resilience

    HDR projects in this space will benefit from new longitudinal survey data made available in 2021 from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey; the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children; Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health; and the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health.

  • Over the past few years I have undertaken a lot of research on the intersections between gender, sexual orientation and life outcomes. This includes studies aimed at understanding health and socio-economic disparities by sexual orientation and the role of stigma and discrimination in producing and reproducing these disparities. It also includes studies on workplace inclusion on the basis of gender and sexuality diversity, and on the individual and social factors contributing to the development of supportive and unsupportive views towards same-sex relations. I am interested in supervising students who also have an interest in this space.

    HDR projects in this space could leverage data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey; Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children; the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health; or the Australian Workplace Equality Index Survey.

  • I am keen to supervise students with a passion for understanding gender inequalities, in Australia or other countries. In this space, I am interested in aspects such as the development of gender-role attitudes, household divisions of labour, parental involvement with children, gender pay gaps, and occupational sex segregation. The role of life-course transitions, such as parenthood, marriage or divorce, on individual and family wellbeing is also of interest to me.

    This research could be based on longitudinal survey data from the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia Survey, or Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children.

  • I have a long-standing interest in the role of social factors, including families, schools and peer groups, on the development of children and adolescents. This involves examining, for example, their physical and socio-emotional, health and educational performance. Projects in this broad space are welcome.

    These projects could leverage survey data on, for example, Growing Up in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Australian Children; Footprints in Time: The Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children; or The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth.

  • I welcome students with an interest in the integration of refugees into Australian society, and the individual and social factors that act as barriers or facilitators for such process.

    This may include projects using survey data from Building a New Life in Australia: The Longitudinal Study of Humanitarian Migrants to Australia.

  • I am interested in supervising projects devoted to understanding whether, how and why men adhere to different models of masculinity, including healthier and "toxic" masculinities. The research may also extend into the consequences of embracing different models of masculinity on men and their families.

    The research could use data from Ten to Men: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health, but other Australian and international data sources are welcome too.